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wire wheels and grinders, sanders for carpet.

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  • bucclivaboard
    im getting ready to get the stuff out and take the 31 year old carpet and cabin overhead. i was told by (philc?)to use a wire wheel on a grinder. should i use
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 2, 2009
      im getting ready to get the stuff out and take the 31 year old carpet and cabin overhead. i was told by (philc?)to use a wire wheel on a grinder. should i use a knoted wheel or the normal "flat" wire. also should i sand at all? i want a smooth surface not the bumps from the fiber glass. can i sand with a random orbit sander with 60 grit and then 80 and if it needs it 100 grit paper. then two coats of killz and then rusoleum over that. for the cabin top do i have to get "over headd" paint? so it will dry faster? also will i need a scraper or putty knife to remove the "big" stuff that does not come off with carpet. i need the info soon!
      thanks
    • Mike
      No..... I wouldn t use a wire wheel on the the carpet or the headliner. You should rent a jackhammer for that....
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 2, 2009
        No..... I wouldn't use a wire wheel on the the carpet or the headliner.

        You should rent a jackhammer for that....
      • bucclivaboard
        i mean for the old glue, a jackhammer? is that if you dont want a hull and deck? ....
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2, 2009
          i mean for the old glue, a jackhammer? is that if you dont want a hull and deck? ....
          >
        • Phil Collins
          Do NOT sand it down smooth. Don t remove any of the resin/glass. If you insist on it being smooth, fill it. (It adds weight, I personally would never do it.)
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 2, 2009
            Do NOT sand it down smooth.
            Don't remove any of the resin/glass.
            If you insist on it being smooth, fill it. (It adds weight, I personally would never do it.)
            But don't remove any glass.

            Regarding paint - I've never heard of 'overhead paint.'


            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard" <natfrost@...> wrote:
            >
            > im getting ready to get the stuff out and take the 31 year old carpet and cabin overhead. i was told by (philc?)to use a wire wheel on a grinder. should i use a knoted wheel or the normal "flat" wire. also should i sand at all? i want a smooth surface not the bumps from the fiber glass. can i sand with a random orbit sander with 60 grit and then 80 and if it needs it 100 grit paper. then two coats of killz and then rusoleum over that. for the cabin top do i have to get "over headd" paint? so it will dry faster? also will i need a scraper or putty knife to remove the "big" stuff that does not come off with carpet. i need the info soon!
            > thanks
            >
          • bucclivaboard
            has any one used Rust-Oleum Paint? i plan on doing two coats off killz and then 2 coats of Rust-Oleum Paint over the fiberglass once the carpet is gone. also
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 3, 2009
              has any one used Rust-Oleum Paint? i plan on doing two coats off killz and then 2 coats of Rust-Oleum Paint over the fiberglass once the carpet is gone. also what is a good paint to use for overhead? i want to use Rust-Oleum Paint but will it cure quick for a job like that? i will be taping and covering everything with drop cloths and newspaper ,carboard... or is there any other good CHEAP paint? thanks
            • Phil Collins
              I use Porch and Deck paint for stuff like that. Ace or whatever brand from Lowes or Home Despot etc, pretty inexpensive. Dries harder and is more wear
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 3, 2009
                I use Porch and Deck paint for stuff like that. Ace or whatever brand from Lowes or Home Despot etc, pretty inexpensive. Dries harder and is more wear resistant than standard paints like rustoleum.

                There is not a problem with panting overhead. They paint ceilings in houses don't they?

                --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard" <natfrost@...> wrote:
                >
                > has any one used Rust-Oleum Paint? i plan on doing two coats off killz and then 2 coats of Rust-Oleum Paint over the fiberglass once the carpet is gone. also what is a good paint to use for overhead? i want to use Rust-Oleum Paint but will it cure quick for a job like that? i will be taping and covering everything with drop cloths and newspaper ,carboard... or is there any other good CHEAP paint? thanks
                >
              • bucclivaboard
                well f you live in the third world if you have a roof it may not be painted! but doesnt that paint cure faster? well from what i have heard the rust-oleum has
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 3, 2009
                  well f you live in the third world if you have a roof it may not be painted! but doesnt that paint cure faster? well from what i have heard
                  the rust-oleum has both marine grade and other paints. plus its $23 a gallon. not much less than floor paint, i will look into both. im thinking i will need two gallons of paint and two of primer. so about $90 with all the stuff i need. what works best on the hull sides brush or roll up with the curve of the hull, and then "tip" with a brush? thanks! o and philc i was kidn around about the third world thing!:)
                • bob_l_broussard
                  ... 1 gallon of primer and 1 gallon of paint should be more than enough. An oil base enamel will be tougher than latex enamel, but takes longer to dry. You can
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 3, 2009
                    --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard" <natfrost@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > well f you live in the third world if you have a roof it may not be painted! but doesnt that paint cure faster? well from what i have heard
                    > the rust-oleum has both marine grade and other paints. plus its $23 a gallon. not much less than floor paint, i will look into both. im thinking i will need two gallons of paint and two of primer. so about $90 with all the stuff i need. what works best on the hull sides brush or roll up with the curve of the hull, and then "tip" with a brush? thanks! o and philc i was kidn around about the third world thing!:)
                    >
                    1 gallon of primer and 1 gallon of paint should be more than enough.
                    An oil base enamel will be tougher than latex enamel, but takes longer to dry. You can apply the paint with a "weenie" roller and finish it off with a brush. Just do small sections at a time so the paint is still wet when you brush it out. If you get the thin roller
                    cover (or foam) you might get away without brushing.
                    Brush the areas you can't roll first, then roll out the rest and see how it looks. you can try this out with the primer. Then you'll have your technic figured out when you get to the paint.
                    After you get the glue off, you can skim the surface with bondo fiberglass jelly. Then sand smooth. That way you'll have a nice surface to paint without removing alot of the existing fiberglass.
                    Some initial sanding is necessary though to knockdown some of the sharp points and edges.
                  • bucclivaboard
                    were can i get that much bondo? im going to post some photos under s/v MAD JIBE. i think im going to brush the hull sides with a stiff brush after using a
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 7, 2009
                      were can i get that much bondo? im going to post some photos under s/v MAD JIBE. i think im going to brush the hull sides with a stiff brush after using a scraper. the hull seems to be smooth under the glue! im thinking about hand sanding the hull with some light sandpaper just to get any last glue off as well as some solvint for glue! then paint the headliner first so drips are under control! then the hull sides both in white and then paint the floor a french grey with floor paint! the sole is ply with rot in on or two spots but only about 1 inch around so i may just cut it out with a hole saw. and sand the floor first with 60 grit, than 80, maybe 100? and put this stuff called shark??? for non skid! sorry about not knowing were to get the bondo im 14 and finding some of this stuff is so much fun:)
                    • bob_l_broussard
                      ... You can get regular Bondo at any auto parts store like Kragens etc. The Bondo brand fiberglass jelly, I get at Orchard Supply. It comes with a tube of
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 11, 2009
                        --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bucclivaboard" <natfrost@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > were can i get that much bondo? im going to post some photos under s/v MAD JIBE. i think im going to brush the hull sides with a stiff brush after using a scraper. the hull seems to be smooth under the glue! im thinking about hand sanding the hull with some light sandpaper just to get any last glue off as well as some solvint for glue! then paint the headliner first so drips are under control! then the hull sides both in white and then paint the floor a french grey with floor paint! the sole is ply with rot in on or two spots but only about 1 inch around so i may just cut it out with a hole saw. and sand the floor first with 60 grit, than 80, maybe 100? and put this stuff called shark??? for non skid! sorry about not knowing were to get the bondo im 14 and finding some of this stuff is so much fun:)
                        >
                        You can get regular Bondo at any auto parts store like Kragens etc.
                        The Bondo brand fiberglass jelly, I get at Orchard Supply.
                        It comes with a tube of cream hardener that is mixed with the stuff in the can. Pick up an extra tube of hardener and some spreaders to apply the bondo. If you use the regular automotive bondo, you can get
                        quarts or gallons. The fiberglass jelly is sold in quarts only.

                        Use a piece of cardboard to mix the bondo on and only mix small amounts. once it is mixed it will start to harden within minutes.
                        So only mix enough to do an area before it starts hardening.
                        How fast it hardens depends on the amount of hardener you mix in and
                        air temperature. The cream hardener is red and will change the color of the bondo material so you can tell if is completely mixed. You'll need to work fast. So plan your moves before you mix.
                        Mask off things beforehand, it can get a little sloppy until you get the hang of things. Wear some latex gloves too.

                        After a couple batches you'll have it figured out.
                        You can clean up equipment with laquer thinner before it sets up.
                        If it starts hardening, you can scrape it off with a putty knife before it hardens completely.

                        Before the bondo is completely hard, you can shave off the high spots and excess bondo with a putty knife or cheese grater style file.
                        Then let it harden completely and sand. Were still talking minutes not hours.
                        If you carve off the excess, but still need more to fill low spots.
                        You can apply more without sanding. Once you have enough applied, the you can sand with 80 grit to get the biggest part sanded. And finish off with 100. 150 grit after the primer should be fine enough.
                        If you think you want to go finer between coats of paint, 220 is plenty.
                      • bucclivaboard
                        i found that a multimaster works great! i used one a boat owner lent me! it eats the old glue all up and then you can use a grinder with a scothbright pad,
                        Message 11 of 11 , Apr 13, 2009
                          i found that a multimaster works great! i used one a boat owner lent me! it "eats" the old glue all up and then you can use a grinder with a scothbright pad, it looks realy good!
                          i was also thinking about useing a dremel tool in the cabin to "cut" the roted core around a few holes, and then tape and fill with epoxy! is that the best way?
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