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Tiller on a Bucc 220

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  • Patricia
    How long should the tiller be on a Bucc220? I have a used tiller on her now, and it feels too long. Before I alter it, I d like to know if there is a
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 27, 2010
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      How long should the tiller be on a Bucc220? I have a used tiller on her now, and it feels too long. Before I alter it, I'd like to know if there is a "standard" length for this boat.

      Pat

      River Flow
      Ossining, NY
    • fubartex
      There is no standard length. How long were the originals? I doubt you can find an original one on a 35-40 year old boat. But I ll tell you this, if you
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 27, 2010
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        There is no "standard" length. How long were the originals? I doubt you can find an "original" one on a 35-40 year old boat. But I'll tell you this, if you can't slide your hatch boards in, it's too long. If everbody in the cockpit has to duck while you tack, it's too long.
        Personally, mine is short enough so I can stand in line between the winches(in a release one sheet/pull in the other, position), and the tiller clears my legs. Nothing worse than getting hung up/backwinded in the middle of a tack because the skipper can't get the tiller past my big butt! I'm going to the boat tomorrow. I'll get a measurement in
        real inches.
        I got my last tiller from H&L Marine in california.....
        cheaper that worst marnie or defender. I think they supply them to defender. Note- they don't have a web site.


        Mike
      • PhilC
        I agree with Mike. I happen to have mine (99% sure it s the original) out in the shed, it s 43 . And I feel it s a bit too long, for the same reasons Mike
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 27, 2010
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          I agree with Mike.
          I happen to have mine (99% sure it's the original) out in the shed, it's 43". And I feel it's a bit too long, for the same reasons Mike states.
        • fubartex
          I measured mine yesterday..... the tiller itself (wooden part) is 36 1/4 inches long. Measuring from the bolt, that holds the tiller bracket to the rudder,
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 30, 2010
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            I measured mine yesterday..... the tiller itself (wooden part) is
            36 1/4 inches long. Measuring from the bolt, that holds the tiller
            bracket to the rudder, the length is 41 inches. Took a couple of pics,
            I'll try to download them tonight.
          • Eric Reams
            Just saw this at work, so I can t be accurate, but; I think mine is 45 long or better. It seems long when you re just sitting there, however, when you re
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 30, 2010
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              Just saw this at work, so I can't be accurate, but;
              I think mine is 45" long or better. It 'seems long' when you're
              just sitting there, however, when you're sailing that extra
              length can be a positive. That rudder swings waayyyyy
              over when you're 'coming about'.


              --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "fubartex" <mike.j.butler@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > I measured mine yesterday..... the tiller itself (wooden part) is
              > 36 1/4 inches long. Measuring from the bolt, that holds the tiller
              > bracket to the rudder, the length is 41 inches. Took a couple of pics,
              > I'll try to download them tonight.
              >
            • fubartex
              Like I said earlier, if everybody in the cockpit has to duck or get out of the way, it s too long. Not that you can get that many people in that little bitty
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 30, 2010
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                Like I said earlier, if everybody in the cockpit has to duck or get out
                of the way, it's too long. Not that you can get that many people in that
                little bitty cockpit. I don't see how any more length would be a positive, my 220 doesn't have much weather helm at all. I singlehand alot and find that the shorter length gives me plenty of room to move around & work the sheets without tiller kicking my legs. Next time it blows 15 to 20, stand in the cockpit and kick the tiller with your leg, in the WRONG DIRECTION. That will cure you, and you'll have a saw in your hand in no time flat.....
              • fubartex
                BTW Eric, I couldn t tell from your photo s... Do you have only longhorns mounted just aft of your sheet winches? Look at the 220 brochure in the files. I
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 30, 2010
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                  BTW Eric,

                  I couldn't tell from your photo's... Do you have only
                  longhorns mounted just aft of your sheet winches? Look at the 220 brochure in the files. I sail on a smallish lake, I tack every 5-10
                  minutes. If I had to tie the jib sheet to a longhorn 48 times in 2 hours of sailing, I'd shoot myself. I have 2 jam cleats just aft of
                  the winches.....makes life and sail trim so much easier.
                  I'm not hating on the horns. In fact if I was going coastal or big lake, I would want the security of a longhorn to tie off on. I'll try to find my CD of pics and post some.
                • PhilC
                  On a boat this size, horn cleats for the sheets are just... unsafe. Bad idea. The loads are not to high for cam cleats, which release instantly in a gust or
                  Message 8 of 20 , Aug 30, 2010
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                    On a boat this size, horn cleats for the sheets are just... unsafe.
                    Bad idea. The loads are not to high for cam cleats, which release instantly in a gust or when you need to tack *now*...

                    Those cleats were the first thing I removed.

                    --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "fubartex" <mike.j.butler@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > BTW Eric,
                    >
                    > I couldn't tell from your photo's... Do you have only
                    > longhorns mounted just aft of your sheet winches? Look at the 220 brochure in the files. I sail on a smallish lake, I tack every 5-10
                    > minutes. If I had to tie the jib sheet to a longhorn 48 times in 2 hours of sailing, I'd shoot myself. I have 2 jam cleats just aft of
                    > the winches.....makes life and sail trim so much easier.
                    > I'm not hating on the horns. In fact if I was going coastal or big lake, I would want the security of a longhorn to tie off on. I'll try to find my CD of pics and post some.
                    >
                  • Eric Reams
                    Yeah, I have two of the quick-release cam cleats in the tool box just waiting for me to install. So far this summer, the few times I ve been out it s been in
                    Message 9 of 20 , Aug 31, 2010
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                      Yeah, I have two of the quick-release cam cleats in the tool box
                      just waiting for me to install. So far this summer, the few
                      times I've been out it's been in 8-10knot winds, sailing
                      North/South (I'm a West Florida, Gulf of Mexico guy) and wind
                      is always coming from the West. So, it's not been so much 'sailing'
                      as it has been 'cruising', lol. I know this fall/winter, hopefully
                      the wind will start to be a little stronger making for a little more excitement. I'm sure the 1st day I hafta tack every 5 minutes, I'll
                      stop right there and install them, lol.

                      --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > On a boat this size, horn cleats for the sheets are just... unsafe.
                      > Bad idea. The loads are not to high for cam cleats, which release instantly in a gust or when you need to tack *now*...
                      >
                      > Those cleats were the first thing I removed.
                      >
                      > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "fubartex" <mike.j.butler@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > BTW Eric,
                      > >
                      > > I couldn't tell from your photo's... Do you have only
                      > > longhorns mounted just aft of your sheet winches? Look at the 220 brochure in the files. I sail on a smallish lake, I tack every 5-10
                      > > minutes. If I had to tie the jib sheet to a longhorn 48 times in 2 hours of sailing, I'd shoot myself. I have 2 jam cleats just aft of
                      > > the winches.....makes life and sail trim so much easier.
                      > > I'm not hating on the horns. In fact if I was going coastal or big lake, I would want the security of a longhorn to tie off on. I'll try to find my CD of pics and post some.
                      > >
                      >
                    • PhilC
                      More likely the first time you get a big gust and take a knockdown while you try to uncleat the loaded-up sheets... ;-) My old stompin grounds?! I grew up in
                      Message 10 of 20 , Aug 31, 2010
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                        More likely the first time you get a big gust and take a knockdown while you try to uncleat the loaded-up sheets... ;-)

                        My old stompin grounds?! I grew up in Milton and Navarre.

                        --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@...> wrote:
                        > I'm sure the 1st day I hafta tack every 5 minutes, I'll
                        > stop right there and install them, lol.
                      • Jbb Doe
                        ... From: PhilC Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Tiller on a Bucc 220 To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com Date: Tuesday,
                        Message 11 of 20 , Aug 31, 2010
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                          ....how 'bout turning into the wind a little....just a thought...

                          --- On Tue, 8/31/10, PhilC <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:

                          From: PhilC <PandD_Collins@...>
                          Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Tiller on a Bucc 220
                          To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 7:09 PM

                           
                          More likely the first time you get a big gust and take a knockdown while you try to uncleat the loaded-up sheets... ;-)

                          My old stompin grounds?! I grew up in Milton and Navarre.

                          --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@...> wrote:
                          > I'm sure the 1st day I hafta tack every 5 minutes, I'll
                          > stop right there and install them, lol.


                        • johnoblizlo
                          Phils correct. Here is a funny story from the Ranger group I m in since I traded my bucc for a ranger (and now a spirit 23). Please don t kick me out I loved
                          Message 12 of 20 , Aug 31, 2010
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                            Phils correct. Here is a funny story from the Ranger group I'm in since I traded my bucc for a ranger (and now a spirit 23). Please don't kick me out I loved my bucc and like to hear your stories. This story transends boat maker and designs...

                            Just a small report of a first sail from a newby member, R20 owner and sailer. We put our R20 in Heron Lake, near Chama, New Mexico this weekend and joined the sailing club/marina there. It was wonderful and only occassionaly embarassing. The winds varied from near nothing to 17 knots and I loved the stability of the Ranger. It took a while to get used to, and comfortable with, the heeling thing, but the boat breeds confidence. When the winds were at the top, we lowered the jib, thinking that discretion is the better part of valor, and continued to learn a tremendous amount about sailing and the boat.

                            Unfortunately, but seemingly par for yours truly, we did provide the marina some entertainment of sorts at the end of the day. After a great first day on the water, we were returning to the public dock where we left the car and trailer in the morning. The marina at Heron is up a river channel from the lake proper, which we managed to navigate with some style under main alone. However, with a fairly strong following wind, we were running up the river doing small jybes with the main locked down pretty close to center to keep our speed down. As we were passing the docks of the marina (to about 15 yards)before making a final jybe to a broad reach to reach the public docks, I was feeling like I really had this sailing thing at partly figured out. Before beginning the jybe and while still sitting to starboard, with the main still cleated close to middle, and moving very slowly,(also noting that much of the sailing club was watching our new and different craft between watching real sailers coming to finish a race) the wind of death came out of nowhere directly to port. In sailing terms, it was a biggie. I didn't dump the sail and actually didn't have time to turn my book-learnin' into action. We were quickly knocked down flat and took on a little water as my friend (a Grand Canyon biologist, who is an experienced Colorado River boatman) followed his river-running instincts and dived out of the boat. Then came the failure of the hook-on ladder that came with the boat and some fun and games with the wind and our 1956 short-shaft Evinrude as everyone watched offering what where, I'm sure, useful and cogent suggestions which, due to near fatal embarrassment, I could not really hear. Somehow, we finally tied up to the walkway and after promising to move the boat to our slip in a bit, we skulked away to lick our wounds.

                            Newbie lessons learned: 1)wear pfd's when the wind is getting over 10 knots; 2) don't cleat the main when nearly sitting still in the land of mega-gusts; 3) save up some money and find a lon-shaft motor; 4)if the marina is full of competent boaters, run away; and 4)for goodness sakes, don't get cocky.

                            Ok. the tale turned out longer than planned, but I hope it gives someone a chuckle or, perhaps, maybe passes on some lesson to other novices. The good news - we had no troubles out on the lake as our little old Ranger is a great teacher.



                            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > More likely the first time you get a big gust and take a knockdown while you try to uncleat the loaded-up sheets... ;-)
                            >
                            > My old stompin grounds?! I grew up in Milton and Navarre.
                            >
                            > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@> wrote:
                            > > I'm sure the 1st day I hafta tack every 5 minutes, I'll
                            > > stop right there and install them, lol.
                            >
                          • Eric Reams
                            Been through those towns, we re in Hudson. Ok course, it s kinda easy when you re too chicken to really sheet in and sail with any real motion. I m so
                            Message 13 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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                              Been through those towns, we're in Hudson.

                              Ok course, it's kinda easy when you're too chicken to really
                              sheet in and sail with any real motion.
                              <Snort>I'm so green if the boat starts to heel,
                              we still ease the main until it gets back to plane, lol.

                              We're gettin' better though. I was probably about 15degrees last time out, woohoo! We're crazy like that.

                              I'm looking forward to a weather
                              change and the real Florida season getting started. While everyone
                              else is looking at Labor Day with a hint of depression, we start to get excited down here. Winter just means a chance of 15kt winds and
                              you might not die from heat exhaustion or dehydration.

                              --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Jbb Doe <c670cj@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > ....how 'bout turning into the wind a little....just a thought...
                              >
                              > --- On Tue, 8/31/10, PhilC <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > From: PhilC <PandD_Collins@...>
                              > Subject: [BaylinerBuccaneerGroup] Re: Tiller on a Bucc 220
                              > To: BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com
                              > Date: Tuesday, August 31, 2010, 7:09 PM
                              >
                              >
                              >  
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > More likely the first time you get a big gust and take a knockdown while you try to uncleat the loaded-up sheets... ;-)
                              >
                              > My old stompin grounds?! I grew up in Milton and Navarre.
                              >
                              > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@> wrote:
                              > > I'm sure the 1st day I hafta tack every 5 minutes, I'll
                              > > stop right there and install them, lol.
                              >
                            • PhilC
                              That does not always work, especially on powered up boats. The 220 has a far more powerful rig than boats like the 240. Here s just one potential scenario for
                              Message 14 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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                                That does not always work, especially on powered up boats. The 220 has a far more powerful rig than boats like the 240.
                                Here's just one potential scenario for you: You get a gust, head up. (That is the normal technique.) Around here, the bigger puffs often have quite a "swirl" associated with their leading edge, so after you head up, you get the back side of the swirl. The bigger ones, will often backwind the genoa, now you get slammed, even with cams its hard to uncleat quick enough... (So we ease at the leading edge of a puff, accellerating with it, then sheet in again after the 'swirl.' Good control, faster.)

                                Tying off your sheets is inviting disaster. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but some day...

                                41 years sailing, 20 years racing, any sort of boat you can imagine, from dinghies to ocean racing. Owned 20+ boats. (Currently own 6) Top 5 at Nationals events more than once. Won the last 6 regattas we entered, one with 7 firsts, one with an Overall Winner trophy and also a first place Team racing win. I'm not trying to brag (although I am quite proud - I race with my daughter!) - just pointing out that I have a bit of experience and am only trying to share helpful info.

                                --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Jbb Doe <c670cj@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > ....how 'bout turning into the wind a little....just a thought...
                                >
                                > --- On Tue, 8/31/10, PhilC <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                              • Eric Reams
                                If you ll look closely at the brightwork picture I recently added, this issue has since been rectified!! I didn t get to sail much since there wasn t any
                                Message 15 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                  If you'll look closely at the "brightwork" picture I recently
                                  added, this issue has since been rectified!!

                                  I didn't get to sail much since there wasn't any wind and
                                  the t-storms where threatening all weekend, so I did the
                                  repair/maintenance thingy! Took your advice and installed those
                                  cams I had.

                                  I'm thinking I'll just remove those two buckhorns now. I can't
                                  really see a reason to keep them there and it makes it better
                                  for sitting on the rail, should I ever get brave enough to actually
                                  heel the boat over. Thoughts?

                                  --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > That does not always work, especially on powered up boats. The 220 has a far more powerful rig than boats like the 240.
                                  > Here's just one potential scenario for you: You get a gust, head up. (That is the normal technique.) Around here, the bigger puffs often have quite a "swirl" associated with their leading edge, so after you head up, you get the back side of the swirl. The bigger ones, will often backwind the genoa, now you get slammed, even with cams its hard to uncleat quick enough... (So we ease at the leading edge of a puff, accellerating with it, then sheet in again after the 'swirl.' Good control, faster.)
                                  >
                                  > Tying off your sheets is inviting disaster. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but some day...
                                  >
                                  > 41 years sailing, 20 years racing, any sort of boat you can imagine, from dinghies to ocean racing. Owned 20+ boats. (Currently own 6) Top 5 at Nationals events more than once. Won the last 6 regattas we entered, one with 7 firsts, one with an Overall Winner trophy and also a first place Team racing win. I'm not trying to brag (although I am quite proud - I race with my daughter!) - just pointing out that I have a bit of experience and am only trying to share helpful info.
                                  >
                                  > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Jbb Doe <c670cj@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > ....how 'bout turning into the wind a little....just a thought...
                                  > >
                                  > > --- On Tue, 8/31/10, PhilC <PandD_Collins@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • bob.sparks@rocketmail.com
                                  Eric That thread really got me thinking about getting some cam cleats as I solo 95% of the time. I thought I would leave the old cleats on as a) a backup if
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                    Eric

                                    That thread really got me thinking about getting some cam cleats as I solo 95% of the time.

                                    I thought I would leave the old cleats on as

                                    a) a backup if the cams fail
                                    b) to hang bumpers or berthing lines
                                    c) to tie down the mast raising struts
                                    d) I don't have to fill the holes.

                                    Bob

                                    --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > If you'll look closely at the "brightwork" picture I recently
                                    > added, this issue has since been rectified!!
                                    >
                                    > I didn't get to sail much since there wasn't any wind and
                                    > the t-storms where threatening all weekend, so I did the
                                    > repair/maintenance thingy! Took your advice and installed those
                                    > cams I had.
                                    >
                                    > I'm thinking I'll just remove those two buckhorns now. I can't
                                    > really see a reason to keep them there and it makes it better
                                    > for sitting on the rail, should I ever get brave enough to actually
                                    > heel the boat over. Thoughts?
                                    >
                                    > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > That does not always work, especially on powered up boats. The 220 has a far more powerful rig than boats like the 240.
                                    > > Here's just one potential scenario for you: You get a gust, head up. (That is the normal technique.) Around here, the bigger puffs often have quite a "swirl" associated with their leading edge, so after you head up, you get the back side of the swirl. The bigger ones, will often backwind the genoa, now you get slammed, even with cams its hard to uncleat quick enough... (So we ease at the leading edge of a puff, accellerating with it, then sheet in again after the 'swirl.' Good control, faster.)
                                    > >
                                    > > Tying off your sheets is inviting disaster. Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but some day...
                                    > >
                                    > > 41 years sailing, 20 years racing, any sort of boat you can imagine, from dinghies to ocean racing. Owned 20+ boats. (Currently own 6) Top 5 at Nationals events more than once. Won the last 6 regattas we entered, one with 7 firsts, one with an Overall Winner trophy and also a first place Team racing win. I'm not trying to brag (although I am quite proud - I race with my daughter!) - just pointing out that I have a bit of experience and am only trying to share helpful info.
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, Jbb Doe <c670cj@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > ....how 'bout turning into the wind a little....just a thought...
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- On Tue, 8/31/10, PhilC <PandD_Collins@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • PhilC
                                    Yep, I removed mine, they are right where I like to sit. (I never sit in the cockpit. But I am Always heeled...)
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                      Yep, I removed mine, they are right where I like to sit. (I never sit in the cockpit. But I am Always heeled...)


                                      --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > If you'll look closely at the "brightwork" picture I recently
                                      > added, this issue has since been rectified!!
                                      >
                                      > I didn't get to sail much since there wasn't any wind and
                                      > the t-storms where threatening all weekend, so I did the
                                      > repair/maintenance thingy! Took your advice and installed those
                                      > cams I had.
                                      >
                                      > I'm thinking I'll just remove those two buckhorns now. I can't
                                      > really see a reason to keep them there and it makes it better
                                      > for sitting on the rail, should I ever get brave enough to actually
                                      > heel the boat over. Thoughts?
                                    • PhilC
                                      Mast raising struts?
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                        Mast raising struts?

                                        --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bob.sparks@..." <bob.sparks@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Eric
                                        >
                                        > That thread really got me thinking about getting some cam cleats as I solo 95% of the time.
                                        >
                                        > I thought I would leave the old cleats on as
                                        >
                                        > a) a backup if the cams fail
                                        > b) to hang bumpers or berthing lines
                                        > c) to tie down the mast raising struts
                                        > d) I don't have to fill the holes.
                                        >
                                        > Bob
                                      • Eric Reams
                                        I hate to admit this, but that s the real motivation for me to go ahead and replace the horns , lol. I like to sit up there too and there s not enough room
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                          I hate to admit this, but that's the real motivation for me to go ahead and replace the 'horns', lol. I like to sit up there too and
                                          there's not enough room with those sticking in my....you know.
                                          Plus, the whole safety issue is actually a priority.

                                          --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Yep, I removed mine, they are right where I like to sit. (I never sit in the cockpit. But I am Always heeled...)
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Reams" <ericreams65@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > If you'll look closely at the "brightwork" picture I recently
                                          > > added, this issue has since been rectified!!
                                          > >
                                          > > I didn't get to sail much since there wasn't any wind and
                                          > > the t-storms where threatening all weekend, so I did the
                                          > > repair/maintenance thingy! Took your advice and installed those
                                          > > cams I had.
                                          > >
                                          > > I'm thinking I'll just remove those two buckhorns now. I can't
                                          > > really see a reason to keep them there and it makes it better
                                          > > for sitting on the rail, should I ever get brave enough to actually
                                          > > heel the boat over. Thoughts?
                                          >
                                        • bob.sparks@rocketmail.com
                                          Sorry my boat is under a tarp for the winter already so I can t take a picture. But if you look at this guy s photos
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Sep 7, 2010
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                                            Sorry my boat is under a tarp for the winter already so I can't take a picture.

                                            But if you look at this guy's photos http://sites.google.com/site/richardstonefeldswetwillie/mast-raising-lowering

                                            I have a crutch like his but its quite a bit taller so I lash stays to the cleats for extra strength.

                                            Bob

                                            --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "PhilC" <PandD_Collins@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Mast raising struts?
                                            >
                                            > --- In BaylinerBuccaneerGroup@yahoogroups.com, "bob.sparks@" <bob.sparks@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > Eric
                                            > >
                                            > > That thread really got me thinking about getting some cam cleats as I solo 95% of the time.
                                            > >
                                            > > I thought I would leave the old cleats on as
                                            > >
                                            > > a) a backup if the cams fail
                                            > > b) to hang bumpers or berthing lines
                                            > > c) to tie down the mast raising struts
                                            > > d) I don't have to fill the holes.
                                            > >
                                            > > Bob
                                            >
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