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Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?

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  • debbie viess
    Tell it, Sister! Mushrooms are not always benign.   Armillaria (aka Honey mushrooms) in our neighborhood has killed a number of mature street trees, starting
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 1 7:06 AM
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      Tell it, Sister! Mushrooms are not always benign.
       
      Armillaria (aka Honey mushrooms) in our neighborhood has killed a number of mature street trees, starting across our street. When it also invaded a pussy willow in our garden that we were attempting to eradicate anyway, I was thrilled (oooo, lookit the pretty mushrooms!). When those black runners spread to my adjacent lilac tree, former source of armloads of spring bouquets, I was MUCH less charmed. The tree died; a few mediocre mushrooms were hardly consolation. Wah. Bad mushrooms!
       
      Rita
       
       
       

      --- On Wed, 4/1/09, Ruth Stiles <ruths@...> wrote:

      From: Ruth Stiles <ruths@...>
      Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
      To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 5:13 AM






      I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill was particularly unlucky.

      I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.

      I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it. Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.

      I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd recommend giving them a try.

      Ruth

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: foghornstudios
      To: BayAreaMushrooms@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
      Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?

      Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.

      Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.

      BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."

      I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our produce.

      Gigi

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Evelyn Tay
      Hi Ruth, Thanks for the info. Can you share how you cultivated blewitts? Where did you get the spawns/kits? We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 1 8:08 AM
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        Hi Ruth,



        Thanks for the info.



        Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?

        Where did you get the spawns/kits?



        We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year, and couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry it, and only an outlet in UK has it.



        Thanks,

        Evelyn










        To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
        From: ruths@...
        Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
        Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?





        I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill was particularly unlucky.

        I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.

        I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it. Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.

        I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd recommend giving them a try.

        Ruth

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: foghornstudios
        To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
        Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?

        Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.

        Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.

        BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."

        I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our produce.

        Gigi

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









        _________________________________________________________________
        Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
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      • Ruth Stiles
        I didn t really cultivate the blewits, they sorta cultivated themselves, and now I m encouraging them to continue. When I m preparing my mushrooms, I heave the
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 1 10:48 AM
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          I didn't really cultivate the blewits, they sorta cultivated themselves, and now I'm encouraging them to continue.

          When I'm preparing my mushrooms, I heave the rotten bits, the squirmy bits, and the dirt encrusted bases out the door. I don't fancy wrigglers in my compost bucket. Some of the debris landed under my peach tree and has been successful in colonizing the area. Now a second ring is starting under my plum tree. Debbie says that it's possible to transplant "blewit butts" and create a patch. It's either that or spores from the over-mature specimens.

          As far as cultivation, the peach tree patch is in an area that gets water every couple of weeks, and gets little direct sunlight in summer. The new plum tree patch is gets no summer water. It's on the shady side of the tree, but still gets some sunlight.

          Good luck!

          Ruth


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Evelyn Tay
          To: bayareamushrooms@yahoogroups.com ; ruths@...
          Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 2009 8:08 AM
          Subject: RE: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?



          Hi Ruth,

          Thanks for the info.

          Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?

          Where did you get the spawns/kits?

          We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year, and couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry it, and only an outlet in UK has it.

          Thanks,

          Evelyn

          To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
          From: ruths@...
          Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
          Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?

          I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill was particularly unlucky.

          I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.

          I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it. Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.

          I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd recommend giving them a try.

          Ruth

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: foghornstudios
          To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
          Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?

          Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.

          Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.

          BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."

          I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our produce.

          Gigi

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          __________________________________________________________
          Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David Lubertozzi
          Stamets has some of the growth parameters for pure culture in /The Mushroom Cultivator/, and some tips on naturalized cultivation in /Mycelium Running/, which
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 1 11:29 AM
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            Stamets has some of the growth parameters for pure culture in /The
            Mushroom Cultivator/, and some tips on naturalized cultivation in
            /Mycelium Running/, which is basically this:

            From a couple of fresh mushrooms, you can propagate them by sandwiching
            the cut stem butt ends (with attached rhizomorphs) between soaked
            corrugated cardboard as a primary inoculum; see /MR/ for details - keep
            these moist in a Tupperware, Ziploc etc. for a few months until they are
            colonized, then lay them under your compost pile or wood chips. I don't
            have any info on what kind of wood they prefer, except to note that the
            wild ones I've seen seem to like a mixture of wood chips, leaf mold and
            other organic matter.

            These places sell blewit spawn so might give you some tips (FP used to
            have it I thought, maybe give em a call if it's not on their website):

            http://www.newearthmushrooms.com
            http://mushroompatch.com

            These guys sell spawn and even have videos of cultivation techniques:
            http://www.mushroommountain.com/grow_your_own/home_cultivation.asp

            I started a "blewit burrito" about six weeks ago and just checked it
            today, the rhizomorphs are extending nicely into the cardboard now. I'll
            let you know if I get any fruit next Fall...


            <http://www.mushroommountain.com/grow_your_own/home_cultivation.asp>

            Evelyn Tay wrote:
            >
            >
            > Hi Ruth,
            >
            > Thanks for the info.
            >
            > Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?
            >
            > Where did you get the spawns/kits?
            >
            > We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year, and
            > couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry it,
            > and only an outlet in UK has it.
            >
            > Thanks,
            >
            > Evelyn
            >
            > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>
            > From: ruths@... <mailto:ruths%40cruzio.com>
            > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
            > Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
            >
            > I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it
            > sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill
            > was particularly unlucky.
            >
            > I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material,
            > and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're
            > the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.
            >
            > I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can
            > be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it.
            > Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.
            >
            > I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd
            > recommend giving them a try.
            >
            > Ruth
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: foghornstudios
            > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
            > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
            > Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
            >
            > Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.
            >
            > Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump
            > the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow
            > there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap
            > species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.
            >
            > BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster
            > blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but
            > accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known
            > carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This
            > is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."
            >
            > I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this
            > really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our
            > produce.
            >
            > Gigi
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > __________________________________________________________
            > Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
            > http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile1_042009
            > <http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile1_042009>
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            --
            David Lubertozzi, Ph.D.

            Keasling Research Group
            Berkeley Center for Synthetic Biology
            University of California, Berkeley
            5885 Hollis St., MC 3224
            Berkeley, CA 94720-3224

            (510) 508-1544



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • David Rust
            Good information, David.    Be careful selecting your cardboard - waterproof boxes have a plastic layer buried in the corrugation that keeps mycelia from
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 1 12:31 PM
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              Good information, David. 
               
              Be careful selecting your cardboard - "waterproof" boxes have a plastic layer buried in the corrugation that keeps mycelia from spreading in that direction and if you're not careful, can serve as a moisture barrier just at the stage you really need it.
               
              David Rust

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • McGuire & McGuire
              As Ruth said, I was unlucky, the chips came from a neighbors trees, I was aware that they had a couple fruit trees die from Honey Mushroom (Oak Root Rot)
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 2 8:37 AM
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                As Ruth said, I was unlucky, the chips came from a neighbors trees, I
                was aware that they had a couple fruit trees die from Honey Mushroom
                (Oak Root Rot) invasion but never considered the Pine Chips would be a
                carrier, I was wrong as I found later the Armillaria fungus will also
                grow on Monterey Pines, but all of that aside, you can never know for
                sure what the yard cleanings and chips contain, to be safe they should
                be composted properly to kill unwanted organisms before using them in
                your garden or mushroom growing beds, IMHO they aren't worth the trouble
                especially with the noxious fungus being transported around such as the
                SOD, Pine Pitch Fungus and as mentioned Oak Root Rot.

                Bill

                debbie viess wrote:
                >
                > Tell it, Sister! Mushrooms are not always benign.
                >
                > Armillaria (aka Honey mushrooms) in our neighborhood has killed a
                > number of mature street trees, starting across our street. When it
                > also invaded a pussy willow in our garden that we were attempting to
                > eradicate anyway, I was thrilled (oooo, lookit the pretty mushrooms!).
                > When those black runners spread to my adjacent lilac tree, former
                > source of armloads of spring bouquets, I was MUCH less charmed. The
                > tree died; a few mediocre mushrooms were hardly consolation. Wah. Bad
                > mushrooms!
                >
                > Rita
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- On Wed, 4/1/09, Ruth Stiles <ruths@...
                > <mailto:ruths%40cruzio.com>> wrote:
                >
                > From: Ruth Stiles <ruths@... <mailto:ruths%40cruzio.com>>
                > Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 5:13 AM
                >
                > I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it
                > sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill
                > was particularly unlucky.
                >
                > I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material,
                > and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're
                > the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.
                >
                > I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can
                > be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it.
                > Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.
                >
                > I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd
                > recommend giving them a try.
                >
                > Ruth
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: foghornstudios
                > To: BayAreaMushrooms@ yahoogroups. com
                > Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
                > Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                >
                > Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.
                >
                > Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump
                > the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow
                > there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap
                > species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.
                >
                > BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster
                > blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but
                > accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known
                > carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This
                > is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."
                >
                > I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this
                > really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our
                > produce.
                >
                > Gigi
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • debbieviess
                Looks like lots of folks have responded to your question Evelyn...my question to you is what is your desired cultivation context? Make up kits? (more
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 2 10:32 AM
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                  Looks like lots of folks have responded to your question Evelyn...my question to you is what is your desired cultivation context? Make up kits? (more difficult), or innoculate a garden? Those garden innoculations are apparently pretty easy, and no purchases necessary...just collect blewitts in season, eat the tops and upper stems and bury the butts in your compost pile! or non-plasticized cardboard sandwich matrix...heck, that way you can ensure that the blewitts you grow actually have the flavor that you desire!

                  As you all in the PNW have also probably experienced, not all blewitts are delicious...maybe growth medium or age of fruit body is the factor...or maybe individual variation...which a clone will eliminate handily!

                  Debbie Viess

                  ps if it's kits you are interested in, I suggest that you contact Don Simoni, a California professional cultivator who has successfully gotten blewitts to grow in kits, altho in all of the years that I've known him, I have only seen ONE kit of blewitts, among the endless boxes of oysters and agaricus...here's the link to his website:

                  http://www.mushroomadventures.com/

                  -- In BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com, Evelyn Tay <evephoenix@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Ruth,
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks for the info.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?
                  >
                  > Where did you get the spawns/kits?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year, and couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry it, and only an outlet in UK has it.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  > Evelyn
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                  > From: ruths@...
                  > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
                  > Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill was particularly unlucky.
                  >
                  > I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.
                  >
                  > I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it. Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.
                  >
                  > I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd recommend giving them a try.
                  >
                  > Ruth
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: foghornstudios
                  > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
                  > Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                  >
                  > Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.
                  >
                  > Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.
                  >
                  > BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."
                  >
                  > I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our produce.
                  >
                  > Gigi
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > _________________________________________________________________
                  > Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
                  > http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile1_042009
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Evelyn Tay
                  Thank you all for your replies. Really appreciate the valuable information. Wild Blewits are not in season. Last fall, we didn t even see a peep of it at all.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 2 11:02 AM
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                    Thank you all for your replies. Really appreciate the valuable information.



                    Wild Blewits are not in season. Last fall, we didn't even see a peep of it at all.



                    May be I should take up Debbie's suggestion, wait for me to luck out this fall for Blewits and then start a Blewit patch.



                    I am very interested in starting a kit - may be a bit later. Urgent tasks at work...



                    Good Mushroom Hunting... and keep us updated on morel sightings...











                    To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                    From: amanitarita@...
                    Date: Thu, 2 Apr 2009 17:32:21 +0000
                    Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?





                    Looks like lots of folks have responded to your question Evelyn...my question to you is what is your desired cultivation context? Make up kits? (more difficult), or innoculate a garden? Those garden innoculations are apparently pretty easy, and no purchases necessary...just collect blewitts in season, eat the tops and upper stems and bury the butts in your compost pile! or non-plasticized cardboard sandwich matrix...heck, that way you can ensure that the blewitts you grow actually have the flavor that you desire!

                    As you all in the PNW have also probably experienced, not all blewitts are delicious...maybe growth medium or age of fruit body is the factor...or maybe individual variation...which a clone will eliminate handily!

                    Debbie Viess

                    ps if it's kits you are interested in, I suggest that you contact Don Simoni, a California professional cultivator who has successfully gotten blewitts to grow in kits, altho in all of the years that I've known him, I have only seen ONE kit of blewitts, among the endless boxes of oysters and agaricus...here's the link to his website:

                    http://www.mushroomadventures.com/

                    -- In BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com, Evelyn Tay <evephoenix@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi Ruth,
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks for the info.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?
                    >
                    > Where did you get the spawns/kits?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year, and couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry it, and only an outlet in UK has it.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    >
                    > Evelyn
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                    > From: ruths@...
                    > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
                    > Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips, it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill was particularly unlucky.
                    >
                    > I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.
                    >
                    > I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it. Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.
                    >
                    > I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard. I'd recommend giving them a try.
                    >
                    > Ruth
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: foghornstudios
                    > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
                    > Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                    >
                    > Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.
                    >
                    > Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.
                    >
                    > BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."
                    >
                    > I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80% of our produce.
                    >
                    > Gigi
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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                  • David Lubertozzi
                    Check out the experiments page http://www.mushroomadventures.com/experiments.html for all of the rarities he s tried. I talked to one of his daughters at the
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 2 11:15 AM
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                      Check out the "experiments" page
                      http://www.mushroomadventures.com/experiments.html
                      for all of the rarities he's tried. I talked to one of his daughters at
                      the Fungus Fair, inquiring about the availability of /A. blazei/, and
                      she said Don might be open to doing any of the oddballs for sale if
                      there was sufficient interest. Maybe if we got enough people in BAMS (+
                      MSSF, SOMA, FFSC...?) to go in on a large order it would be worth their
                      time to make a special batch of kits for us.

                      debbieviess wrote:
                      >
                      > Looks like lots of folks have responded to your question Evelyn...my
                      > question to you is what is your desired cultivation context? Make up
                      > kits? (more difficult), or innoculate a garden? Those garden
                      > innoculations are apparently pretty easy, and no purchases
                      > necessary...just collect blewitts in season, eat the tops and upper
                      > stems and bury the butts in your compost pile! or non-plasticized
                      > cardboard sandwich matrix...heck, that way you can ensure that the
                      > blewitts you grow actually have the flavor that you desire!
                      >
                      > As you all in the PNW have also probably experienced, not all blewitts
                      > are delicious...maybe growth medium or age of fruit body is the
                      > factor...or maybe individual variation...which a clone will eliminate
                      > handily!
                      >
                      > Debbie Viess
                      >
                      > ps if it's kits you are interested in, I suggest that you contact Don
                      > Simoni, a California professional cultivator who has successfully
                      > gotten blewitts to grow in kits, altho in all of the years that I've
                      > known him, I have only seen ONE kit of blewitts, among the endless
                      > boxes of oysters and agaricus...here's the link to his website:
                      >
                      > http://www.mushroomadventures.com/ <http://www.mushroomadventures.com/>
                      >
                      > -- In BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>, Evelyn Tay
                      > <evephoenix@...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Hi Ruth,
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for the info.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Can you share how you cultivated blewitts?
                      > >
                      > > Where did you get the spawns/kits?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > We (at WA) have been looking around in the Web for the last year,
                      > and couldn't find anybody who sells it. Fungi Perfecti doesn't carry
                      > it, and only an outlet in UK has it.
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Thanks,
                      > >
                      > > Evelyn
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > From: ruths@...
                      > > Date: Tue, 31 Mar 2009 22:13:23 -0700
                      > > Subject: Re: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I can't see why thistle seeds would come with fresh arborist chips,
                      > it sounds like a strange thing to stuff into the chipper. I think Bill
                      > was particularly unlucky.
                      > >
                      > > I really like arborists' chips. They're a good mulch or path
                      > material, and the price is right. Many people in the field think that
                      > they're the best kind of mulch for landscape trees.
                      > >
                      > > I'd be careful about introducing armillaria into a landscape, it can
                      > be a nasty pathogen. It's heartbreaking to watch a tree die from it.
                      > Mushrooms (if they show up) are a small consolation.
                      > >
                      > > I just had another fruiting of blewits in my little home orchard.
                      > I'd recommend giving them a try.
                      > >
                      > > Ruth
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: foghornstudios
                      > > To: BayAreaMushrooms@yahoogroups.com
                      > <mailto:BayAreaMushrooms%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Sent: Tuesday, March 31, 2009 1:08 PM
                      > > Subject: [BAMS] Re: Monterey pine wood chips good for cultivation?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks - Will, Patrick, Debbie for sharing your knowledge.
                      > >
                      > > Thistle?!! Gulp. Am just experimenting with a small area and will
                      > dump the rest somewhere that always gets muddy so who knows what will
                      > grow there. We have more than our fair share of H. fasciculare, inky
                      > cap species, and something that may be a Psathyrella growing on our lawn.
                      > >
                      > > BTW, I wonder if I should be concerned about putting the spent
                      > oyster blocks in my garden. We add beneficial nematodes to the garden
                      > but accord. to wiki: "The oyster mushroom is also one of the few known
                      > carnivorous mushrooms. Its mycelia can kill and digest nematodes. This
                      > is believed to be a way to obtain nitrogen."
                      > >
                      > > I realize there's constant warfare going on in nature, but should
                      > this really keep me up at night? We rely on our garden for about 80%
                      > of our produce.
                      > >
                      > > Gigi
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > __________________________________________________________
                      > > Rediscover Hotmail®: Now available on your iPhone or BlackBerry
                      > >
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                      > <http://windowslive.com/RediscoverHotmail?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_HM_Rediscover_Mobile1_042009>
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      >
                      >

                      --
                      David Lubertozzi, Ph.D.

                      Keasling Research Group
                      Berkeley Center for Synthetic Biology
                      University of California, Berkeley
                      5885 Hollis St., MC 3224
                      Berkeley, CA 94720-3224

                      (510) 508-1544



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