Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [BatAdvoGroup] Yellow bats

Expand Messages
  • Cynthia Myers
    I think using the older bat as a tutor is a great idea, and I use other bats (already volant juvies or adults that come into care) in my flight cage with
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 17, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I think using the older bat as a "tutor" is a great idea, and I use other
      bats (already volant juvies or adults that come into care) in my flight cage
      with hand-reared youngsters whenever I get the chance. I have sat in the
      cage at night and watched them learn to imitate the older wild bats'
      foraging behavior!

      But it seems like a 6x6x6 enclosure isn't big enough for those larger bats
      to get adequate practice. That would probably work for injured adult bats
      that just need to practice prior to release, but for youngsters to actually
      learn to hunt you'd need more room and a way to get bugs inside the cage.

      I have a 12'x22'x7' mesh flight cage and I keep two LED camping lanterns on
      all night inside the cage to attract smaller insects through the mesh, and I
      also have a black light bug trap that I use to catch bigger bugs and release
      into the cage.
      http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Napper-Live-Catcher/dp/B0002DIZ98 I also have
      a little 4'x8' plastic-lined "pond" inside my cage, about 2" deep, and I can
      watch the Myotis practice getting drinks of water as they swoop across the
      surface.

      We mostly get Big Brown and various Myotis pups here, so I have no
      experience teaching Lasiurines to fly (Carol gets all those Red pups!), but
      I think they need more room to learn. Do you have any larger aviaries that
      could be temporarily repurposed for bat practice?

      Cindy Myers
      Fallbrook CA

      http://home.earthlink.net/~cmsquare
      ^..^


      -----Original Message-----
      Subject: [BatAdvoGroup] Yellow bats

      So the three juvenile yellow bats we are raising are doing well. We are now
      feeding them worm "glop" and Carnivore Care exclusively, supplementing with
      a drop of calcium glubionate daily. We have moved them permanently into our
      6x6x6 small flight cage. We are still feeding them 4 times daily, and their
      weights have stabilized at 13-15g. However, we have a couple more problems
      we are trying to address and am wondering if anyone has any suggestions.

      1. The last time we see the little guys is around 8 pm at their last
      feeding. It is still light here at this time and no one has seen them flying
      or attempting to. They are always high up in the habitat in the morning, but
      certainly could crawl there. Short of putting a night-vision camera out
      there (which we are considering) does anyone have any other ideas of how to
      flight test them? I read that hand-raised juvenile tree bats are often
      "lazy" and will not fly.

      2. Our bats are still not eating any worms on their own. I don't really
      think they are eating any worms overnight and doubt that they are getting
      stray bugs in there either. Again, I read that is can be hard to get this
      species to self-feed. Any tips?



      Thanks - we would really like to get these little guys released but don't
      know how to move forward. We do have a slightly injured adult female that we
      just got in. Perhaps when she is doing better we could put her with them and
      she might serve as a "good example"?
    • Leslie Sturges
      I agree that they need more space and more bugs. I had a 12 flight cage that was round, and the bats did OK, but as soon as I went to a 15 octagon, the
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 21, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree that they need more space and more bugs. I had a 12' flight cage that was round, and the bats did OK, but as soon as I went to a 15' octagon, the nights got much more wild! In think most if not all Lasiurines are open air hawkers, not clutter feeders, so they need room to move. 

        Leslie


        On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 1:25 PM, Cynthia Myers <cmsquare@...> wrote:
         

        I think using the older bat as a "tutor" is a great idea, and I use other
        bats (already volant juvies or adults that come into care) in my flight cage
        with hand-reared youngsters whenever I get the chance. I have sat in the
        cage at night and watched them learn to imitate the older wild bats'
        foraging behavior!

        But it seems like a 6x6x6 enclosure isn't big enough for those larger bats
        to get adequate practice. That would probably work for injured adult bats
        that just need to practice prior to release, but for youngsters to actually
        learn to hunt you'd need more room and a way to get bugs inside the cage.

        I have a 12'x22'x7' mesh flight cage and I keep two LED camping lanterns on
        all night inside the cage to attract smaller insects through the mesh, and I
        also have a black light bug trap that I use to catch bigger bugs and release
        into the cage.
        http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Napper-Live-Catcher/dp/B0002DIZ98 I also have
        a little 4'x8' plastic-lined "pond" inside my cage, about 2" deep, and I can
        watch the Myotis practice getting drinks of water as they swoop across the
        surface.

        We mostly get Big Brown and various Myotis pups here, so I have no
        experience teaching Lasiurines to fly (Carol gets all those Red pups!), but
        I think they need more room to learn. Do you have any larger aviaries that
        could be temporarily repurposed for bat practice?

        Cindy Myers
        Fallbrook CA

        http://home.earthlink.net/~cmsquare
        ^..^

        -----Original Message-----
        Subject: [BatAdvoGroup] Yellow bats

        So the three juvenile yellow bats we are raising are doing well. We are now
        feeding them worm "glop" and Carnivore Care exclusively, supplementing with
        a drop of calcium glubionate daily. We have moved them permanently into our
        6x6x6 small flight cage. We are still feeding them 4 times daily, and their
        weights have stabilized at 13-15g. However, we have a couple more problems
        we are trying to address and am wondering if anyone has any suggestions.

        1. The last time we see the little guys is around 8 pm at their last
        feeding. It is still light here at this time and no one has seen them flying
        or attempting to. They are always high up in the habitat in the morning, but
        certainly could crawl there. Short of putting a night-vision camera out
        there (which we are considering) does anyone have any other ideas of how to
        flight test them? I read that hand-raised juvenile tree bats are often
        "lazy" and will not fly.

        2. Our bats are still not eating any worms on their own. I don't really
        think they are eating any worms overnight and doubt that they are getting
        stray bugs in there either. Again, I read that is can be hard to get this
        species to self-feed. Any tips?

        Thanks - we would really like to get these little guys released but don't
        know how to move forward. We do have a slightly injured adult female that we
        just got in. Perhaps when she is doing better we could put her with them and
        she might serve as a "good example"?




        --
        Leslie Sturges
        President
        The Save Lucy Campaign
        www.saveLucytheBat.org
      • Antonia Gardner
        Our yellow bats have been doing well. One is released (was flying well and actually got out of the habitat). He was older than the other two, who are siblings.
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 15, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Our yellow bats have been doing well. One is released (was flying well and actually got out of the habitat). He was older than the other two, who are siblings. Of those two, one is definitely flying, I have seen it fly and we have some video set up in the habitat and can tell he is flying. I do not believe the other is flying, although I am not completely sure. I have tried to force him to fly a couple of times, holding him over a thick blanket and gently shaking him off my hand. He flaps his wings and glides to the ground, but does not really make strong attempts to fly. We are doing radiographs later today, although I do not think we will find anything structurally wrong since the wings look normal, and he flaps them and folds them normally. We have had them for two months. They are between 14-16 g and good body condition. Does anyone have any tips for further evaluating readiness for release and helping condition them for flight? Thanks.


          Antonia Gardner, DVM
          Staff Veterinarian, Intern/Extern Program Coordinator
          South Florida Wildlife Center
          agardner@...<mailto:agardner@...>
          t 954-524-2926 f 954-524-2679
          Visit us at our Facebook page!<http://www.facebook.com/southfloridawildlifecenter>
          South Florida Wildlife Center
          3200 S.W. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
          wildlifecarecenter.org<http://www.wildlifecarecenter.org/>, hsus.org<http://www.humanesociety.org/>
          Join Our Email List<https://community.hsus.org/humane/join?source=gabhkl> Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6041057841> Twitter<http://twitter.com/HumaneSociety>
          [New Logo SouthFloridaWildlifeCenter_Logo_cx1]
        • Antonia Gardner
          I posted last week regarding two juvenile yellow bats that we have raised, and are hoping to release. One of them is still not flying, and the other one is. We
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 19, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            I posted last week regarding two juvenile yellow bats that we have raised, and are hoping to release. One of them is still not flying, and the other one is. We are considering releasing the one that is flying, but they are siblings and I think it would be best to keep the two of them together. We have done radiographs, there does not appear to be anything structurally wrong, he flaps his wings and glides but refuses to actually fly. They are 15-16g, came in 2 months ago at 8g. Any suggestions? Is it to early for him to be flying, or is there probably something wrong that we haven't found?


            Antonia Gardner, DVM
            Staff Veterinarian, Intern/Extern Program Coordinator
            South Florida Wildlife Center
            agardner@...<mailto:agardner@...>
            t 954-524-2926 f 954-524-2679
            Visit us at our Facebook page!<http://www.facebook.com/southfloridawildlifecenter>
            South Florida Wildlife Center
            3200 S.W. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
            wildlifecarecenter.org<http://www.wildlifecarecenter.org/>, hsus.org<http://www.humanesociety.org/>
            Join Our Email List<https://community.hsus.org/humane/join?source=gabhkl> Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6041057841> Twitter<http://twitter.com/HumaneSociety>
            [New Logo SouthFloridaWildlifeCenter_Logo_cx1]
          • Leslie Sturges
            I can only base my answer on red bat behavior, since we never get yellows, but they re related, so what the hack... Release the one that s ready. They aren t
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 19, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I can only base my answer on red bat behavior, since we never get yellows, but they're related, so what the hack...

              Release the one that's ready. They aren't as social as colonial bats and seem to be OK as long as they can fly and get their own food. Give the other guy time, and try giving him a bigger space. I was shocked at how much more and better flight ability I saw when we built a bigger flight cage. Mine is 15 ft in diameter and octagonal. That doesn't sound big until you're inside it.

              My cage has wooden decking for a floor and stiff mesh panels that come down to the floor. When they land on the floor, they try to take off, but if they can't, they crawl then climb to a higher point and take off again. I think that crawling and climbing behavior helps them develop flight strength. I imagine tree bats get that sort of exercise by moving around on their perches. I watch people flight train bats, and they keep picking them up to give them more lift. I suggest letting them solve their own problems by letting them crawl and climb as much as they fly. 

              If you're already doing all that, then just give him time. Sometimes I get big browns that just aren't ready to go until spring. It hasn't happened with reds, but I get fewer reds so I'm sure there are some slowpokes in the population!

              Leslie


              On Mon, Aug 19, 2013 at 9:40 AM, Antonia Gardner <agardner@...> wrote:
               

              I posted last week regarding two juvenile yellow bats that we have raised, and are hoping to release. One of them is still not flying, and the other one is. We are considering releasing the one that is flying, but they are siblings and I think it would be best to keep the two of them together. We have done radiographs, there does not appear to be anything structurally wrong, he flaps his wings and glides but refuses to actually fly. They are 15-16g, came in 2 months ago at 8g. Any suggestions? Is it to early for him to be flying, or is there probably something wrong that we haven't found?

              Antonia Gardner, DVM
              Staff Veterinarian, Intern/Extern Program Coordinator
              South Florida Wildlife Center
              agardner@...<mailto:agardner@...>
              t 954-524-2926 f 954-524-2679
              Visit us at our Facebook page!<http://www.facebook.com/southfloridawildlifecenter>
              South Florida Wildlife Center
              3200 S.W. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
              wildlifecarecenter.org<http://www.wildlifecarecenter.org/>, hsus.org<http://www.humanesociety.org/>
              Join Our Email List<https://community.hsus.org/humane/join?source=gabhkl> Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6041057841> Twitter<http://twitter.com/HumaneSociety>
              [New Logo SouthFloridaWildlifeCenter_Logo_cx1]




              --
              Leslie Sturges
              President
              The Save Lucy Campaign
              www.saveLucytheBat.org
            • Antonia Gardner
              Thank you Leslie! We will release the one that is flying very soon. Hopefully the other one will get his act together soon. These two guys have been quite a
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 19, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Thank you Leslie! We will release the one that is flying very soon. Hopefully the other one will get his act together soon. These two guys have been quite a learning experience for us!

                We had them in a pretty large enclosure. We have just had to move them back to a smaller mesh enclosure, but will get him back out to a bigger one soon.




                Antonia Gardner, DVM
                Staff Veterinarian, Intern/Extern Program Coordinator
                South Florida Wildlife Center
                agardner@...<mailto:agardner@...>
                t 954-524-2926 f 954-524-2679
                Visit us at our Facebook page!<http://www.facebook.com/southfloridawildlifecenter>
                South Florida Wildlife Center
                3200 S.W. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
                wildlifecarecenter.org<http://www.wildlifecarecenter.org/>, hsus.org<http://www.humanesociety.org/>
                Join Our Email List<https://community.hsus.org/humane/join?source=gabhkl> Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6041057841> Twitter<http://twitter.com/HumaneSociety>
                [New Logo SouthFloridaWildlifeCenter_Logo_cx1]
                ________________________________
                From: BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com [BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Leslie Sturges [lsturges@...]
                Sent: Monday, August 19, 2013 10:22 AM
                To: BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [BatAdvoGroup] Yellow bats



                I can only base my answer on red bat behavior, since we never get yellows, but they're related, so what the hack...

                Release the one that's ready. They aren't as social as colonial bats and seem to be OK as long as they can fly and get their own food. Give the other guy time, and try giving him a bigger space. I was shocked at how much more and better flight ability I saw when we built a bigger flight cage. Mine is 15 ft in diameter and octagonal. That doesn't sound big until you're inside it.

                My cage has wooden decking for a floor and stiff mesh panels that come down to the floor. When they land on the floor, they try to take off, but if they can't, they crawl then climb to a higher point and take off again. I think that crawling and climbing behavior helps them develop flight strength. I imagine tree bats get that sort of exercise by moving around on their perches. I watch people flight train bats, and they keep picking them up to give them more lift. I suggest letting them solve their own problems by letting them crawl and climb as much as they fly.

                If you're already doing all that, then just give him time. Sometimes I get big browns that just aren't ready to go until spring. It hasn't happened with reds, but I get fewer reds so I'm sure there are some slowpokes in the population!

                Leslie


                On Mon, Aug 19, 2013 at 9:40 AM, Antonia Gardner <agardner@...<mailto:agardner@...>> wrote:


                I posted last week regarding two juvenile yellow bats that we have raised, and are hoping to release. One of them is still not flying, and the other one is. We are considering releasing the one that is flying, but they are siblings and I think it would be best to keep the two of them together. We have done radiographs, there does not appear to be anything structurally wrong, he flaps his wings and glides but refuses to actually fly. They are 15-16g, came in 2 months ago at 8g. Any suggestions? Is it to early for him to be flying, or is there probably something wrong that we haven't found?

                Antonia Gardner, DVM
                Staff Veterinarian, Intern/Extern Program Coordinator
                South Florida Wildlife Center
                agardner@...<mailto:agardner%40humanesociety.org><mailto:agardner@...<mailto:agardner%40humanesociety.org>>
                t 954-524-2926<tel:954-524-2926> f 954-524-2679<tel:954-524-2679>
                Visit us at our Facebook page!<http://www.facebook.com/southfloridawildlifecenter>
                South Florida Wildlife Center
                3200 S.W. 4th Avenue Fort Lauderdale, FL 33315
                wildlifecarecenter.org<http://wildlifecarecenter.org><http://www.wildlifecarecenter.org/>, hsus.org<http://hsus.org><http://www.humanesociety.org/>
                Join Our Email List<https://community.hsus.org/humane/join?source=gabhkl> Facebook<http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6041057841> Twitter<http://twitter.com/HumaneSociety>
                [New Logo SouthFloridaWildlifeCenter_Logo_cx1]



                --
                Leslie Sturges
                President
                The Save Lucy Campaign
                www.saveLucytheBat.org<http://www.saveLucytheBat.org>
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.