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Hmmmmm....

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  • Carol B.
    Either the range of the tri-colored bat has changed, or I didn t remember it correctly.  According to BCI, it s range covers all of Oklahoma EXCEPT the
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 1, 2013
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      Either the range of the tri-colored bat has changed, or I didn't remember it correctly.  According to BCI, it's range covers all of Oklahoma EXCEPT the panhandle (I had thought that it was more similar to the range of evening bats.).  That means, with regard to the species identification of the bat in the photo, we're back to being unable to decide between the cave myotis and tri-colored bat without further information.

      Oh, well....

      Carol
    • Bruce Taylor
      Don t rely too heavily on those maps. Their produced by Natureserve.org I was finding discripancies in number of species in Oklahoma from BCI, our
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 1, 2013
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        Don’t rely too heavily on those maps. Their produced by Natureserve.org  I was finding discripancies in number of species in Oklahoma from BCI, our Conservation department and IUCN, and USGS. After talking with Natureserve. (Nature Conservancy and the Haritage Foundation) There is a lot of assumptions used.  Things like if they don’t get a report on a certain bat they may remove that species from their list.  Thay had Little brown listed as endangered on their map for Okalahoma (I get a couple every year) that’s when I  found out it has nothing to do if the state protects the animal it’s from their own scientists and their estimates as to where the bats are located.  In Oklahoma depending on who’s list you use you could have 22 species or as many 28.  It would be great if there was some way to tag every bat and see where they are located maybe in a 100 years or so it will be possible putting nanites in bugs or something.

         

        From: BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Carol B.
        Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 2:06 PM
        To: BatAdvoGroup
        Subject: [BatAdvoGroup] Hmmmmm....

         

         

        Either the range of the tri-colored bat has changed, or I didn't remember it correctly.  According to BCI, it's range covers all of Oklahoma EXCEPT the panhandle (I had thought that it was more similar to the range of evening bats.).  That means, with regard to the species identification of the bat in the photo, we're back to being unable to decide between the cave myotis and tri-colored bat without further information.

        Oh, well....

        Carol

      • Carol B
        It still surprises me that you get little brown bats. In all the years Beverly has been doing bat rehab, she has never gotten one, so I guess you ve gotten
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 1, 2013
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          It still surprises me that you get little brown bats.  In all the years Beverly has been doing bat rehab, she has never gotten one, so I guess you've gotten lucky.  They're not native to my part of the state, so I've definitely never gotten one.  The only one I've ever seen in real life was one at Bat World.

          Carol

          On Apr 1, 2013, at 7:39 PM, "Bruce Taylor" <fewerr@...> wrote:

          Don’t rely too heavily on those maps. Their produced by Natureserve.org  I was finding discripancies in number of species in Oklahoma from BCI, our Conservation department and IUCN, and USGS. After talking with Natureserve. (Nature Conservancy and the Haritage Foundation) There is a lot of assumptions used.  Things like if they don’t get a report on a certain bat they may remove that species from their list.  Thay had Little brown listed as endangered on their map for Okalahoma (I get a couple every year) that’s when I  found out it has nothing to do if the state protects the animal it’s from their own scientists and their estimates as to where the bats are located.  In Oklahoma depending on who’s list you use you could have 22 species or as many 28.  It would be great if there was some way to tag every bat and see where they are located maybe in a 100 years or so it will be possible putting nanites in bugs or 


        • Bruce Taylor
          Two of them came from Monte Casino Catholic School buildings about 100 years old so I figure they got a roost in the school somewhere maybe several.
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 1, 2013
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            Two of them came from Monte Casino Catholic School  buildings about 100 years old so I figure they got a roost in the school somewhere maybe several.  They’ve called me several times on Big Browns and I think I picked up an Evening bat from there too.  I always have to use my ID sheet and weigh and measure them to make sure there not a small big brown or something else they all checked right across. I find their fur darker and silkier than a big brown at least the ones I’ve had. Oh and I’m pretty sure they’ve all been males too. 

             

            From: BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Carol B
            Sent: Monday, April 01, 2013 10:35 PM
            To: BatAdvoGroup@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [BatAdvoGroup] Hmmmmm....

             

             

            It still surprises me that you get little brown bats.  In all the years Beverly has been doing bat rehab, she has never gotten one, so I guess you've gotten lucky.  They're not native to my part of the state, so I've definitely never gotten one.  The only one I've ever seen in real life was one at Bat World.

             

            Carol


            On Apr 1, 2013, at 7:39 PM, "Bruce Taylor" <
            fewerr@...> wrote:

            Don’t rely too heavily on those maps. Their produced by Natureserve.org  I was finding discripancies in number of species in Oklahoma from BCI, our Conservation department and IUCN, and USGS. After talking with Natureserve. (Nature Conservancy and the Haritage Foundation) There is a lot of assumptions used.  Things like if they don’t get a report on a certain bat they may remove that species from their list.  Thay had Little brown listed as endangered on their map for Okalahoma (I get a couple every year) that’s when I  found out it has nothing to do if the state protects the animal it’s from their own scientists and their estimates as to where the bats are located.  In Oklahoma depending on who’s list you use you could have 22 species or as many 28.  It would be great if there was some way to tag every bat and see where they are located maybe in a 100 years or so it will be possible putting nanites in bugs or 

             

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