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FW: Critical bat issue - please help us

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  • Cynthia Myers
    Please help us get these poor pallid bats retired from a lab at Texas A&M University and prevent the researchers from doing any additional damage to the wild
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 7, 2008
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      Please help us get these poor pallid bats retired from a lab at Texas A&M University and prevent the researchers from doing any additional damage to the wild colony, by signing this petition  http://www.thepetitionsite.com/1/end-cruel-experiments-on-wild-caught-bats and sharing with other folks who care for bats and other wildlife. The former lab assistant who stepped forward to save these bats and prevent any more wild captures is named Missy Young, as she decided she could no longer remain anonymous and silent. Once she did step forward with a formal complaint, her job was “downsized.”  Keep in mind that TAMU encourages other students to capture more bats during maternity season, as described on this site: http://www.cvm.tamu.edu/cquick/Bats/pallid_bats.htm  which is horribly stressful on a wild maternity colony, and ensures death by starvation of any pups left behind.

       

       

      Cindy Myers
      Fallbrook CA
      home.earthlink.net/~cmsquare 
      ^
      ..^

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Abby Stott [mailto:murcielagita@...]
      Sent
      :
      Saturday, December 06, 2008 4:52 PM
      Subject: Critical bat issue - please help us

      I am writing to you as a fellow bat lover. My name is Abby and I desperately need your help to save pallid bats whose fate is being decided as we speak. First and foremost, please know that this is the only time you will ever hear from me - you are not on a spam list. I am only writing to you now because there is strength in numbers, and I know you care about bats. When you finish this e-mail, please be sure to forward it to everyone in your address book. We don't have long to act, and the lives of the bats depend on us.

      Sincerely,

      Abby
      --------------------------
       

      The following information outlines the years of cruelty these pallid bats have been subjected to. Contact information for the researchers involved is listed below. Although disturbing, please read this in its entirety to gain a full understanding of why this capture and experimentation should not continue. Photos are at the bottom of this e-mail.


      Dr. Christopher Quick, who heads this research, works for
      Texas A&M University in the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology. Dr. Quick has been allowed to perform research on pallid bats for several years. He takes the bats from a 20 + year, known roost. As a result of the removal of so many bats, a steady decrease in the population has occurred. In the past few years he has been allowed to take over 50 pallid bats, the majority of them females. This means that over 40 females were not allowed to give birth to one pup a year for over 4 years, resulting in the loss of 160 bats with in a four year time span, many who would have also reproduced.

      The experiments that are performed under Dr. Quick's care are not entirely terminal and as a result, these bats have been subjected to an unnatural environment long-term, and forced to work during the day when they should be asleep. They are exposed to up to 15 different types of drugs, alcohol and periodic painful medical procedures without sedation. They are used in experiments for up to six hours per day. Witnesses have seen the bats struggling for so long during experiments that they eventually began urinating blood due to the stress of the experiment.

      The majority of Dr. Quick's literature states that the bat is placed in a box and is lightly covered with gauze during experiments. What is not explained is that the gauze is on the outside of the experiment box the bat is restrained in. The bat is made to lie on its back in an unnatural position; a plastic plate is then inserted over the bats arm bone acting as an arm bridge preventing the bat from lifting its arm. The top of the box is then closed over the bat's body and the box is screwed shut with wing nuts. The bat's wing and fingers are then forced to lie open and flat, being held in place with q-tips that are secured at the end with silly putty. Several bats have been so stressed during these experiments that they chew threw the skin on their arms and began chewing on their arm bone just to try and free themselves from the experiment box.

      Bats are also subjected to what is called a pressurized box.  This box is used in the same fashion as the one previously described, but it is air tight. The bat is subjected to pressure on its body to create vessel dilation in the vessels of its wings (similar to a hyperbaric chamber used by humans). This experiment runs on average 4 hours. This research has been allowed to continue despite the fact that these incidences were reported to Texas A&M University's Animals Compliance Committee, who choose to turn a blind eye to what was happening behind closed doors. It was even suggested by an Animal compliance chair member that 'if the bats were still eating and hanging upright then they must be happy'. When it was requested to retire bats that have been used for more than three years, another committee chairperson responded by saying, 'how do you know the bats are unhappy in captivity, can you prove that they do not like being part of research?' Many pages can be filled with the concerns voiced by those alarmed by seeing injuries the bats have received during experiments, such as, wing tears,broken fingers, and many burned wings. Not to mention the lack of supervision and control Christopher Quick has over his lab.

      A large portion of the bats that currently remain in his captive colony at A&M have been there for over four years. They live in a room with concrete walls and meager roosts. Their only form of enrichment was being fed crickets, which they were allowed to hunt for on the ground of their enclosure, and that was stopped once the facility where the bats are housed complained about the noise and the amount of cricket's escapes. Dr. Quick has had his lab temporarily shut down and investigated two times so far due to valid complaints of misuse of bats and lack of supervision.

      Additionally, Dr. Quick was absent the majority of the first two years in his research laboratory and relied solely on his graduate students for the output of data for the research. Two years ago, Dr. Quick collected 25 more bats from Valentine,
      Texas. While these bats were in quarantine, one of them succumbed to rabies. As a result, Dr. Quick ordered all of the remaining 24 bats euthanized, even after the CDC recommended the bats instead be spared and held in quarantine for another six months. Dr. Quick also had the option of retiring all 24 bats to Bat World Sanctuary where they would never be in close proximity to the public. Instead, these bats were euthanized with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in a gas chamber by Texas A&M University's Comparative Medicine Veterinarian, despite the fact that credible literature states that bats have a high tolerance to CO2 and the use of CO2 to euthanize bats is considered inhumane. One by one each bat was gassed, and then placed in a plastic zip-lock bag and placed into a frigerator to await tissue sample collection to test for rabies. Some of the bats remained alive after being gassed and it was not known until they woke up in agony while being necropsied. After it was discovered that some of the bats were not fully deceased, their necks were broken. Results concluded that ALL 24 of those bats were found to be negative forrabies. This information has to be supplied to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) as part of an annual review of the current status of Christopher Quick's research bats that still remain in captivity, as well as how many have died or have been euthanized.

      TPWD is aware of the number of bats killed, as well as the current complaints, yet they continue to allow Christopher Quick to capture more bats every year. The wild colony in west
      Texas where these pallid bats roost used to be 10,000 + bats strong. Now, in large part due to Christopher Quick's continual harvesting of the colony over the last five years, there are less than 25 bats. The collection taking place today could very well wipe out the entire colony.

      I am sending this information on behalf of several people who have witnessed the mistreatment of the bats in Christopher Quick's care. These individuals wish to remain anonymous but want to come forth to set the record straight and stand up for what is right. These individuals are asking for your support. Please feel free to forward this message to other animal rights groups. I sincerely hope that YOU, along with PETA, IDA, HSUS and other groups will unite and respond to this situation, ending the capture of pallid bats to be used in this research, and force these bats that have worked for so long to finally be retired.

      Please do what is in your power to stop this research.  Please help save these animals by writing to the following people to voice your concern:

      Christopher M. Quick, Ph.D. (cquick@...)

      Dr. Quick's boss is Dr. Glen Laine, who is also the department head: glaine@...

      Comparative Medicine Program, is Betsy Browder: bbrowder@...

      Office of Animal Compliance can either be addressed to the Director Dewey Kramer or Olivia Ash: joa@... , animalcompliance@...

      If you will be writing them and mailing, use these addresses for both Dr. Laine and Dr. Quick:

      Dr. Glen Laine/Dr. Christopher Quick
      Texas A&M University
      Hwy 60
      Department of Physiology and Pharmacology
      College Station, TX 77845

      Texas A&M University
      Comparative Medicine Program
      Dr. Betsy Browder
      Agronomy Rd.
      College Station, TX 77845

      Office of Research Compliance
      Angelia Raines, Director & Olivia Ash Program Coordinator (Research Involving Animals)
      750 Agronomy Rd
      General Services Complex,
      Ste. 3501
      1186 TAMU
      College Station, TX 77843-3120

      ____________________________________________________________

      Photos from the Texas A&M lab of these inhumane experiments on wild pallid bats   - this is the "pressure box" 

      If the description of these experiments or these photos have disturbed you, and you want to help end this senseless torture, please write and also CLICK HERE and sign this petition - just one click can help save lives.

      On behalf of the bats we all care about, thank you again.

      Abby

    • Deborah Crough
      yes, I am on it waiting until I get to school tomorrow as I have my old information from the IACUC which oversee s this university as well....was going to pull
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 7, 2008
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        yes, I am on it
        waiting until I get to school tomorrow as I have my old information from the IACUC which oversee's this university as well....was going to pull from the guidelines etc.
        If you are able....google IACUC and go to some of the web pages
        this is a federally mandated committee that is to oversee all animal research
        the complaints should also really be sent to the committee chair of his IACUC
        that is were you will get immediate attention
        anyways I rattle on as I am trying to settle for the night
        c. is back in a cast and may need surgery on her foot can you believe this?
        she has 2 stress fractures probably from walking so much when she could not exercise
        one in her heel and one carpel
        at any rate...google IACUC and if I have something in my files or on my computer at school I will  send along
        The investigators are to follow the certain protocols that have been approved by this committee.....the membership should be addressed as well
        there is public documentation somewhere about his protocol
        or at least the public should have legal access
        while you cannot get the entire protocol you can see the 'cover page' if you will and his justification for using live animals etc.
        anyway I ramble on
        If one can grab them by the IACUC or ULAR (another managing branch) 'balls' you got them running
        will send myself a copy of this to remind myself to look into those files and IF I find anything helpful will let you know
        bestitos
        d
         
         
        --- On Sun, 12/7/08, Cynthia Myers <cmsquare@...> wrote:
        From: Cynthia Myers <cmsquare@...>
        Subject: [CAbatgroup] FW: Critical bat issue - please help us
        To: cmsquare@...
        Date: Sunday, December 7, 2008, 6:35 PM

        Please help us get these poor pallid bats retired from a lab at Texas A&M University and prevent the researchers from doing any additional damage to the wild colony, by signing this petition  http://www.thepetit ionsite.com/ 1/end-cruel- experiments- on-wild-caught- bats and sharing with other folks who care for bats and other wildlife. The former lab assistant who stepped forward to save these bats and prevent any more wild captures is named Missy Young, as she decided she could no longer remain anonymous and silent. Once she did step forward with a formal complaint, her job was “downsized.”  Keep in mind that TAMU encourages other students to capture more bats during maternity season, as described on this site: http://www.cvm. tamu.edu/ cquick/Bats/ pallid_bats. htm  which is horribly stressful on a wild maternity colony, and ensures death by starvation of any pups left behind.

         

         

        Cindy Myers
        Fallbrook CA
        home.earthlink. net/~cmsquare 
        ^
        ..^

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Abby Stott [mailto:murcielagit a@...]
        Sent
        :
        Saturday, December 06, 2008 4:52 PM
        Subject: Critical bat issue - please help us

        I am writing to you as a fellow bat lover. My name is Abby and I desperately need your help to save pallid bats whose fate is being decided as we speak. First and foremost, please know that this is the only time you will ever hear from me - you are not on a spam list. I am only writing to you now because there is strength in numbers, and I know you care about bats. When you finish this e-mail, please be sure to forward it to everyone in your address book. We don't have long to act, and the lives of the bats depend on us.

        Sincerely,

        Abby
        ------------ --------- -----
         

        The following information outlines the years of cruelty these pallid bats have been subjected to. Contact information for the researchers involved is listed below. Although disturbing, please read this in its entirety to gain a full understanding of why this capture and experimentation should not continue. Photos are at the bottom of this e-mail.


        Dr. Christopher Quick, who heads this research, works for
        Texas A&M University in the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology. Dr. Quick has been allowed to perform research on pallid bats for several years. He takes the bats from a 20 + year, known roost. As a result of the removal of so many bats, a steady decrease in the population has occurred. In the past few years he has been allowed to take over 50 pallid bats, the majority of them females. This means that over 40 females were not allowed to give birth to one pup a year for over 4 years, resulting in the loss of 160 bats with in a four year time span, many who would have also reproduced.

        The experiments that are performed under Dr. Quick's care are not entirely terminal and as a result, these bats have been subjected to an unnatural environment long-term, and forced to work during the day when they should be asleep. They are exposed to up to 15 different types of drugs, alcohol and periodic painful medical procedures without sedation. They are used in experiments for up to six hours per day. Witnesses have seen the bats struggling for so long during experiments that they eventually began urinating blood due to the stress of the experiment.

        The majority of Dr. Quick's literature states that the bat is placed in a box and is lightly covered with gauze during experiments. What is not explained is that the gauze is on the outside of the experiment box the bat is restrained in. The bat is made to lie on its back in an unnatural position; a plastic plate is then inserted over the bats arm bone acting as an arm bridge preventing the bat from lifting its arm. The top of the box is then closed over the bat's body and the box is screwed shut with wing nuts. The bat's wing and fingers are then forced to lie open and flat, being held in place with q-tips that are secured at the end with silly putty. Several bats have been so stressed during these experiments that they chew threw the skin on their arms and began chewing on their arm bone just to try and free themselves from the experiment box.

        Bats are also subjected to what is called a pressurized box.  This box is used in the same fashion as the one previously described, but it is air tight. The bat is subjected to pressure on its body to create vessel dilation in the vessels of its wings (similar to a hyperbaric chamber used by humans). This experiment runs on average 4 hours. This research has been allowed to continue despite the fact that these incidences were reported to Texas A&M University's Animals Compliance Committee, who choose to turn a blind eye to what was happening behind closed doors. It was even suggested by an Animal compliance chair member that 'if the bats were still eating and hanging upright then they must be happy'. When it was requested to retire bats that have been used for more than three years, another committee chairperson responded by saying, 'how do you know the bats are unhappy in captivity, can you prove that they do not like being part of research?' Many pages can be filled with the concerns voiced by those alarmed by seeing injuries the bats have received during experiments, such as, wing tears,broken fingers, and many burned wings. Not to mention the lack of supervision and control Christopher Quick has over his lab.

        A large portion of the bats that currently remain in his captive colony at A&M have been there for over four years. They live in a room with concrete walls and meager roosts. Their only form of enrichment was being fed crickets, which they were allowed to hunt for on the ground of their enclosure, and that was stopped once the facility where the bats are housed complained about the noise and the amount of cricket's escapes. Dr. Quick has had his lab temporarily shut down and investigated two times so far due to valid complaints of misuse of bats and lack of supervision.

        Additionally, Dr. Quick was absent the majority of the first two years in his research laboratory and relied solely on his graduate students for the output of data for the research. Two years ago, Dr. Quick collected 25 more bats from Valentine,
        Texas. While these bats were in quarantine, one of them succumbed to rabies. As a result, Dr. Quick ordered all of the remaining 24 bats euthanized, even after the CDC recommended the bats instead be spared and held in quarantine for another six months. Dr. Quick also had the option of retiring all 24 bats to Bat World Sanctuary where they would never be in close proximity to the public. Instead, these bats were euthanized with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in a gas chamber by Texas A&M University's Comparative Medicine Veterinarian, despite the fact that credible literature states that bats have a high tolerance to CO2 and the use of CO2 to euthanize bats is considered inhumane. One by one each bat was gassed, and then placed in a plastic zip-lock bag and placed into a frigerator to await tissue sample collection to test for rabies. Some of the bats remained alive after being gassed and it was not known until they woke up in agony while being necropsied. After it was discovered that some of the bats were not fully deceased, their necks were broken. Results concluded that ALL 24 of those bats were found to be negative forrabies. This information has to be supplied to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) as part of an annual review of the current status of Christopher Quick's research bats that still remain in captivity, as well as how many have died or have been euthanized.

        TPWD is aware of the number of bats killed, as well as the current complaints, yet they continue to allow Christopher Quick to capture more bats every year. The wild colony in west
        Texas where these pallid bats roost used to be 10,000 + bats strong. Now, in large part due to Christopher Quick's continual harvesting of the colony over the last five years, there are less than 25 bats. The collection taking place today could very well wipe out the entire colony.

        I am sending this information on behalf of several people who have witnessed the mistreatment of the bats in Christopher Quick's care. These individuals wish to remain anonymous but want to come forth to set the record straight and stand up for what is right. These individuals are asking for your support. Please feel free to forward this message to other animal rights groups. I sincerely hope that YOU, along with PETA, IDA, HSUS and other groups will unite and respond to this situation, ending the capture of pallid bats to be used in this research, and force these bats that have worked for so long to finally be retired.

        Please do what is in your power to stop this research.  Please help save these animals by writing to the following people to voice your concern:

        Christopher M. Quick, Ph.D. (cquick@tamu. edu)

        Dr. Quick's boss is Dr. Glen Laine, who is also the department head: glaine@tamu. edu

        Comparative Medicine Program, is Betsy Browder: bbrowder@cvm. tamu.edu

        Office of Animal Compliance can either be addressed to the Director Dewey Kramer or Olivia Ash: joa@vprmail. tamu.edu , animalcompliance@ vprmail.tamu. edu

        If you will be writing them and mailing, use these addresses for both Dr. Laine and Dr. Quick:

        Dr. Glen Laine/Dr. Christopher Quick
        Texas A&M University
        Hwy 60
        Department of Physiology and Pharmacology
        College Station, TX 77845

        Texas A&M University
        Comparative Medicine Program
        Dr. Betsy Browder
        Agronomy Rd.
        College Station, TX 77845

        Office of Research Compliance
        Angelia Raines, Director & Olivia Ash Program Coordinator (Research Involving Animals)
        750 Agronomy Rd
        General Services Complex,
        Ste. 3501
        1186 TAMU
        College Station, TX 77843-3120

        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ ___
        Photos from the Texas A&M lab of these inhumane experiments on wild pallid bats   - this is the "pressure box" 
        If the description of these experiments or these photos have disturbed you, and you want to help end this senseless torture, please write and also CLICK HERE and sign this petition - just one click can help save lives.
        On behalf of the bats we all care about, thank you again.
        Abby

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