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EDIT: OR - GSI Outdoors 1 L Stainless Dukjug - Chris Hunt

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  • Ray
    Hi Chris, Welcome to BackpackGearTest and thank you for this, your first Owner Review. I will be your editor for this review. Your initial edits will follow.
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2013
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      Hi Chris,

      Welcome to BackpackGearTest and thank you for this, your first Owner Review. I will be your editor for this review. Your initial edits will follow. They will take the following format;

      EDIT: must be changed
      Edit: should be changed but will be left to your discretion
      Comment: just that or something to think about

      When you have made the changes please repost here with REPOST added to the subject line. Include your name also please.

      Some very helpful information may be found here;
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=BecomeTester&page=1

      Please notice the form that the review should take in the "Examples", you may also wish to browse the reviews of other experienced members for examples of the proper form.

      A helpful tool is the Mentoring Program that teams new reviewers with experienced veterans to help get them through their first review(s). If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to the mentor coordinator, Jenn, at mentor@...

      Ray



      ***GSI OUTDOORS 1 L STAINLESS DUKJUG

      According to the manufacturer it is called the "Glacier" Stainless Dukjug so you should add that to the title.



      ***LOCATION: Brooklyn, NY USA

      EDIT: please spell out the state for the benefit of our international readers


      ***Listed Weight: 9.4 oz (266.5 g)
      ***Measured Weight: 9.4 oz (266.5 g)

      Edit: we don't decimalize the grams, just 266 is fine. (I know my scale won't show fractions of grams.)



      ***Other details: Dimensions: Diameter: 3.50" (8.89 cm); Height: 8.20" (20.8 cm)

      EDIT: you are supposed to show the listed dimensions, and your measured actual dimensions



      ***As any athlete, outdoorsperson, or hydration enthusiast can attest, there is
      currently no shortage of water-portaging vessels

      EDIT: to avoid projection you need to keep the review focused on you and your opinions, feelings, experience, etc. You can't speak for "any" other people, just yourself. Try to think of another way to convey your meaning.




      ***CamelBak-style reservoirs are light and offer the convenience of hands-free
      sipping, but their narrow mouths make them tough to fill, the tubes and bite
      valves are prone to freezing in cold temperatures, and they can be difficult to
      use without wearing a pack equipped with a hydration sleeve. Some backpackers
      are also concerned about the potential health impacts of exposure to the
      plastics from which these reservoirs are constructed. While many modern models
      are manufactured without the toxin Bisphenol A (BPA), scientists continually
      discover new health threats posed by chemicals in plastics - and leaching of
      these substances is of particular concern when a plastic vessel is filled with a
      very hot liquid (e.g., freshly boiled water produced by melting snow in the
      backcountry).

      One-liter Nalgene-style bottles are inexpensive, easy to fill, and can be
      stashed in any pack, bag, or oversized pocket - but like hydration bladders,
      they're made of plastics, and thus present the concerns noted above.

      Aluminum water bottles, while lightweight, are prone to denting and are
      typically produced in non-standard sizes (so they won't fit well in backpack
      water bottle pockets or insulated bottle parkas, and can complicate water
      purification when using tablets or other treatment systems designed to treat
      water in one-liter increments). Furthermore, these bottles are often lined with
      synthetic coatings, which some users would rather avoid.

      That entire section needs to be reworked. You need to focus on what your concerns are, not what others may feel. Plus you need to talk about what you have tried and used. You are grouping everything together.

      To tell the truth I don't see the point in that at all. You are here to review the GSI bottle, not discuss the inherent limitations of other products.



      ***The GSI Outdoors 1 L Stainless Dukjug is a water bottle

      EDIT: please add "Glacier" since you are using the full name



      *** (When it's extremely cold, many backpackers melt snow to procure water,

      EDIT: when it's extremely cold, I melt snow to procure water (keep it in the first person)



      ***This differs from standard Nalgene-style lids, which are attached to the bottles by a strip of plastic, which can, after prolonged use, break and/or become separated from the lid.

      EDIT: has this happened to you? If so say "which can, in my experience, break"
      If not it is just speculation and should be removed.


      ***The most distinctive feature of the Dukjug is one that will appeal to (or annoy)
      summer and winter backpackers alike

      EDIT: again, change it to be talking about you and your likes and dislikes. You can't speak for anybody else.


      While the Dukjug's duct tape indentation is certainly unique, it might not
      appeal to all users. For instance, those who carry messier liquids (e.g.,
      soups, hot chocolate, etc.) might dislike that the indentation

      EDIT: remove, or reword please. No guessing what others might use it for.


      ***Ultralight backpackers will lament the extra weight

      EDIT: see above


      It's great if you're at all concerned about the potential hazards of plastics. And of course, it's great if you're incredibly serious about using your water bottle to store duct tape. As long as you're willing to carry a little extra weight,

      EDIT: We keep everything in the first person, no "you"s, just "me" and "I". Here is my canned explanation.

      Projection

      "When you tighten the laces on the boots, you pull the shoestrings in an out and upward motion. Then you tie it with a double knot and you are ready to go down the trail."

      This is a very common way to write, but in doing so we just said what "other people" would do, not ourselves. This is projecting our thoughts onto the reader. We do not know how other people tie their shoes. We keep away from "you" and "your" in our writing.

      We are writing a review of "our" gear based on "our" experiences. So we need to keep it in the first person. Here is how it should look;

      "When I tighten the laces on the boots, I pull the shoestrings in an out and upward motion. Then I tie it with a double knot and I'm ready to go down the trail."


      You also need a Field Conditions section (or something like that) listing some of the places you have used it and the conditions encountered. Take a look at other reviews on the site to see what I mean.
    • chcoa
      RAY - BP - Chris Hunt(1) - GSI Outdoors 1 L Stainless Dukjug - Posted Jul 27(82234), Taken Aug 1, Edit Aug 2 (82249), Follow up sent Oct 15 Hi Chris, I hope we
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 15, 2013
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        RAY - BP - Chris Hunt(1) - GSI Outdoors 1 L Stainless Dukjug - Posted Jul 27(82234), Taken Aug 1, Edit Aug 2 (82249), Follow up sent Oct 15

        Hi Chris,

         

        I hope we didn’t scare you off.  Following a review of our Owner Review queue at BackpackGearTest.org I noticed you have not responded to the Edit given for the above Owner's Review, which was posted by Ray back on Aug. 2nd.  Please refer to message number 82249 at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BackpackGearTest/messages

         

        Are you planning to continue with the OR?  We are here to help so please don't hesitate to ask if there is something we can assist you with so you can complete your Owner Review?

        Please let me know how you wish to proceed with this review so I can inform your editor and update the Edit Queue.

        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Editors Team Director

         



        ---In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, <backpackgeartest@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        GSI OUTDOORS 1 L STAINLESS DUKJUG
        BY CHRIS HUNT
        OR
        July 27, 2013

        TESTER INFORMATION

        NAME: Chris Hunt
        EMAIL: chrisonascreen@...
        AGE: 32
        LOCATION: Brooklyn, NY USA
        GENDER: m
        HEIGHT: 5' 8" (1.73 m)
        WEIGHT: 135 lb (61.20 kg)

        I began backpacking 20 years ago, and intend to continue as long as I'm able. I backpack primarily in the Northeast during all four seasons, and have extensive experience in the Adirondacks. I've also hiked and backpacked in the White Mountains and Catskills, and sporadically throughout the US (e.g., Cascades, Rockies, Grand Canyon, etc.) My backpacking style is lightweight, but not quite minimalist/ultralight; I generally carry ~20 pounds (9.1 kilograms) in the summer and ~45 pounds (20.4 kilograms) in the winter. I live in Brooklyn, NY, but travel to the woods whenever I can.

        PRODUCT INFORMATION

        Manufacturer: GSI Outdoors
        Year of Manufacture: 2011
        Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.gsioutdoors.com/" LINK TEXT = "GSI Outdoors">>
        MSRP: US$18.95
        Listed Weight: 9.4 oz (266.5 g)
        Measured Weight: 9.4 oz (266.5 g)
        Other details: Dimensions: Diameter: 3.50" (8.89 cm); Height: 8.20" (20.8 cm)

        FIELD USE

        Background
        As any athlete, outdoorsperson, or hydration enthusiast can attest, there is currently no shortage of water-portaging vessels on the retail market. Most options for backpackers fall into three main categories: CamelBak-style water reservoirs designed to be carried inside the pack; one-liter (33.8 oz) Nalgene-style wide-mouth plastic water bottles; and tall-and-skinny, usually-less-than-one-liter water bottles constructed of aluminum or stainless steel.

        All three varieties have benefits and drawbacks:

        CamelBak-style reservoirs are light and offer the convenience of hands-free sipping, but their narrow mouths make them tough to fill, the tubes and bite valves are prone to freezing in cold temperatures, and they can be difficult to use without wearing a pack equipped with a hydration sleeve. Some backpackers are also concerned about the potential health impacts of exposure to the plastics from which these reservoirs are constructed. While many modern models are manufactured without the toxin Bisphenol A (BPA), scientists continually discover new health threats posed by chemicals in plastics - and leaching of these substances is of particular concern when a plastic vessel is filled with a very hot liquid (e.g., freshly boiled water produced by melting snow in the backcountry).

        One-liter Nalgene-style bottles are inexpensive, easy to fill, and can be stashed in any pack, bag, or oversized pocket - but like hydration bladders, they're made of plastics, and thus present the concerns noted above.

        Aluminum water bottles, while lightweight, are prone to denting and are typically produced in non-standard sizes (so they won't fit well in backpack water bottle pockets or insulated bottle parkas, and can complicate water purification when using tablets or other treatment systems designed to treat water in one-liter increments). Furthermore, these bottles are often lined with synthetic coatings, which some users would rather avoid.

        The Dukjug
        The GSI Outdoors 1 L Stainless Dukjug is a water bottle that holds (surprise, surprise) one liter (33.8 oz) of liquid, and is constructed of (you guessed it), 18/8 grade stainless steel (note that the lid is constructed of BPA-free polyethylene).

        Size
        The dimensions of the Dukjug are nearly identical to those of the classic one-liter wide-mouth Nalgene bottle, which allows it to fit perfectly in backpack water bottle pouches, and, perhaps more importantly, in standard one-liter insulated water bottle parkas. This characteristic is especially significant since the Dukjug, by virtue of its stainless steel construction, excels as a liquid-carrying solution in sub-freezing conditions. (When it's extremely cold, many backpackers melt snow to procure water, which is then poured - often at high temperatures - directly into water bottles, which are immediately stowed inside insulated bottle parkas to retain heat and stave off the ice-bottle phenomenon for as long as possible. It's nice to be able to let this hot water sit in the bottle indefinitely without worrying about which nasty endocrine disruptors might be leaching in.)

        "Cam-Profile" Lid
        Another winter-worthy innovation boasted by the Dukjug is its unique "cam-profile" lid, which features a prominent bulge that provides a thumb-leverage point. This facilitates removal with gloves or mittens, and is especially useful if the lid's threads are frozen.

        The lid is tethered to the bottle by a short nylon cord attached to a plastic ring that rotates freely around the lip of the bottle. This differs from standard Nalgene-style lids, which are attached to the bottles by a strip of plastic, which can, after prolonged use, break and/or become separated from the lid. While the Dukjug's nylon lid cord is more durable (and easily replaceable if it were ever damaged), the plastic ring around the Dukjug's lid seems slightly less secure than that on a Nalgene bottle, and seems more likely to detach if the bottle were hung by the tether when full.

        Duct Tape Storage
        The most distinctive feature of the Dukjug is one that will appeal to (or annoy) summer and winter backpackers alike - the bottle is crafted with a slight indentation around its circumference designed for duct tape storage (many backpackers wrap duct tape around water bottles to afford easy access without incurring the weight penalty of lugging an entire roll of tape). The Dukjug's indentation facilitates easy wrapping, and a removable rubberized grip slides over the indentation to protect the tape below from wear and tear (duct-tape-bottle-wrapping devotees know how quickly the material can deteriorate in the backcountry - think gummed-up edges and abraded surfaces). The grip also makes the bottle easier on the hands by providing insulation and traction. The insulative properties are particularly important since stainless steel conducts heat so efficiently; if the bottle is filled with cold water, it will chill hands quickly; if filled with boiling water, it can burn uncovered skin. Unfortunately, the Dukjug's grip is not a solid strip of material, but is instead constructed in a diamond pattern with holes large enough for fingers and palms to press through. This presents a hazard when the bottle is filled with boiling water - especially when little or no duct tape has been wrapped underneath the grip.

        While the Dukjug's duct tape indentation is certainly unique, it might not appeal to all users. For instance, those who carry messier liquids (e.g., soups, hot chocolate, etc.) might dislike that the indentation creates two ridges on the inside of the bottle, making it slightly more difficult to clean. The rubberized grip also adds a small amount of weight to the bottle, and makes it a little bit more difficult to add/remove duct tape to/from the bottle since the grip fits snugly, and can be hard to pull on/off the bottle. And of course, those who don't use water bottles for duct tape storage will find little use for the feature.

        Graduations
        Unfortunately, unlike most plastic water bottles, the Dukjug lacks any internal or external graduations to facilitate measurement of liquid within.

        Weight
        Ultralight backpackers will lament the extra weight of the Dukjug's stainless steel construction; the bottle weighs in at a hefty 9.4 oz (266.5 g), nearly 50 percent heavier than a standard plastic Nalgene bottle (6.31 oz {179 g}), and more than 500 percent heavier than a one-liter soda bottle (1.5 oz {42.5 g}).

        Price
        Budget-conscious backpackers should note that the Dukjug retails for $18.95 (USD) - almost twice the price of comparable one-liter plastic water bottles. However, the added expenditure could pay off in the long run since the Dukjug's stainless steel construction will likely outlast plastic when subjected to extended use in the backcountry.

        Bottom Line
        Having owned a DukJug for several years and used it at least two dozen nights in the field (in both summer and winter conditions), I can attest to its merits. It's bomber. It's great for winter. It's great if you're at all concerned about the potential hazards of plastics. And of course, it's great if you're incredibly serious about using your water bottle to store duct tape. As long as you're willing to carry a little extra weight, can do without graduations for precise liquid measurement, and don't mind spending a bit more for a product that will last, the Dukjug is an outstanding choice for backcountry hydration.
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