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REVISED Owner Review Mont Bell Handy Scoop

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  • Jlee Snow
      REVISED   TESTER INFORMATION:   NAME:Joe Schaffer EMAIL:    never2muchstuff@yahoo.com AGE:      65 GENDER:   Male HEIGHT:   5’9”  (1.75
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 16, 2013
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      REVISED
       
      TESTER INFORMATION:
       
      NAME:Joe Schaffer
      EMAIL:    never2muchstuff@...
      AGE:      65
      GENDER:   Male
      HEIGHT:   5’9”  (1.75 meters)
      WEIGHT:   175#  (79.4 kilos)
      HOME:  Hayward, CA
       
      Backpacking bit me in the
      Pacific NW over 50 years ago. Since 2001 I’ve cavorted mostly in California, up
      to 95 nights a year. I camp every month; about half the time solo. I’m an
      insatiable gear hog working part time at an outdoor store; and a convicted
      comfort camper lugging tent, mattress, chair, etc. Summer trips last typically
      a week to 10 days; 40#, about half food related; about 5 miles per hiking day.
      I winter camp at 6-7k; 2-3 nights; 55#; 1-4 miles on snowshoes.
       
      The Product
       
      Manufacturer: Mont-Bell
      Web site:
      http://www.montbell.us/
      Product: Handy Scoop
      Year
      purchased: 2010
       
      My measures:
      Weight:  1 3/8oz  (39gms)
      Length: 6 1/4” (159mm)
      Handle length:  3” (76mm)
      Handle width:  7/8”  (22mm)
      Blade length:  3.25”  (83mm)
      Blade width (max): 1 9/16”
      (40mm)
          
      Cost: (2010 delivered):
      $15
       
      Factory specs (from
      website): 
      Weight: 1.4 oz
      Length: 6.25”
      MSRP: $16
       
       
      Product Description:
       
      Longitudinally curved
      stainless steel 1mm thick with plastic-coated handle and a webbing strap.
       
      Field conditions:
       
      I've aggregated about 45 excavations
      over three seasons with this product in all kinds of terra firma from sand to
      humus; accumulated in having it on hand for 175 days out. (Actually I am compulsive enough to keep written records of use frequency on many products. At my age and frequency of use for this one, given the level of confidence I have in its likely lifespan, it never occurred to me to record use for this one. Thus, I must submit only a calculation. I would be happy to indulge any skeptic the math path, but that would seem more appropriate for a late night campfire venue.)

       
      Observations:
       
      I don’t know how many Red
      Snappers I’ve snapped over the years, often owing to urgency. The old plastic
      trowels fill the hand and can move a volume of loose dirt; but they won’t
      tolerate prying. The Handy Scoop won’t break or bend, perhaps in part because
      it isn’t big enough to get a lot of leverage. However, it will pry out stones
      and rubble that would snap the traditional plastic trowel. (The newer trowels
      made of recycled Lexan are cheap and very strong, but also heavy.) I find it
      nearly impossible to dig without prying at some point.
       
      In sand, the plastic
      trowel will move material much faster than the Handy Scoop. However, when the
      ground is that loose, I find it more convenient just to scrape a hole with a
      boot heel.
       
      In firm gravelly dirt, the
      Handy Scoop beats a plastic trowel for ease and speed. The small, relatively
      sharp blade cuts into dirt and humus more easily than a larger blade and won’t
      torque the wrist on hurried excavations. While a larger blade has potentially
      more capacity, the more common conditions prevent loading a large blade to its
      potential.
       
      It isn’t any better than a
      right angle stick, so the hardest core minimalist cannot be denied his or her
      objection. I find it comforting to know I always have digging capacity readily
      at hand for about the weight of a gel.
       
      Handy Scoop quick shots:
       
      a)    Low weight
      b)    Small
      c)    Expedient
      d)    More $ than a stick
       
                                -30-

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jamie D.
      PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 25, 2013
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        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community! The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints, to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely manner. Do not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben(at)hotmail.com

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.

        Once your first two Owner Reviews have been approved and you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to Jenn K., the mentor coordinator, at mentor (at) backpackgeartest.org.

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group. These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
        will usually result in a better review, as well as making things easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject line of your re-submitted review if you take this route or make any
        changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups list to keep track of the progress of your Owner Review. Once an Editor has taken your OR and made the necessary edits they will post their comments to the list with EDIT in the subject line. Once you have incorporated these edits into your review please use REPOST in the subject line. When your OR has been approved by the Editor they will use APPROVED in the subject line.

        If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR while it's in the edit queue, the entire Owner Review Queue is posted to this yahoo group list on either Thursdays or Fridays.

        If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask via the list or contact me directly.

        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Editors Team Director
      • Ray
        Hello Joe, Welcome to BackpackGearTest and thank you for your Owner Review, your initial edits will follow. They will take the following format; EDIT: must be
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 27, 2013
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          Hello Joe,

          Welcome to BackpackGearTest and thank you for your Owner Review, your initial edits will follow. They will take the following format;

          EDIT: must be changed
          Edit: should be changed but will be left to your discretion
          Comment: just that or something to think about

          When you have made the changes please repost here with REPOST added to the subject line. Include your name also please.

          Some very helpful information may be found here;
          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=BecomeTester&page=1

          Please notice the form that the review should take in the "Examples", you may also wish to browse the reviews of other experienced members for examples of the proper form.

          A helpful tool is the Mentoring Program that teams new reviewers with experienced veterans to help get them through their first review(s). If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to the mentor coordinator, Jenn, at mentor@...

          Ray




          ***HOME: Hayward, CA

          EDIT: please spell out the state for the benefit of our international readers



          *** Summer trips last typically a week to 10 days; 40#, about half food related; about 5 miles per hiking day. I winter camp at 6-7k; 2-3 nights; 55#; 1-4 miles on snowshoes.


          EDIT: the abbreviation for pounds is lb and you need Metric conversions for all measurements, weights, distances, etc.
          You should put the elevation in feet and meters.









          ***Manufacturer: Mont-Bell

          EDIT: after many years of dealing with MontBell and their multitude of spelling styles BGT decided to stick with one way, the one in their legal name: MontBell Co Ltd



          ***Web site: http://www.montbell.us/

          EDIT: we only allow/want the top-level URL for the manufacturer. In this case it is http://montbell.com



          ***Weight: 1 3/8oz (39gms)

          EDIT: need spaces after the numbers. No "s" in "gm"; 1 3/8 oz (39 gm) Please correct all of them.

          EDIT: I am not sure why you went with 1-3/8 oz instead of the correct 1.4 oz listed by the manufacturer. Is that the actual weight measured by you? If so put "Actual weight" or something like that. And I would use decimals rather than fractions as it makes it easier for the reader to compare.



          ***Cost: (2010 delivered): $15

          EDIT: we need the current MSRP from the manufacturer only. So as you have it later you can delete this.




          ***Product Description:

          Longitudinally curved stainless steel 1mm thick with plastic-coated handle and a webbing strap.

          Edit: I understand that there is not a lot to say about a trowel but being able to describe to the reader what you are reviewing is very important. (And will make you get noticed for testing later.) I think you can do more with this if you think about it. Look at the reviews from other veteran writers for examples. A spoon or spork review would be similar too.

          Is the construction of your scoop one-piece? What is the webbing strap? A pull, or a loop, or a lanyard? Is the handle hard or soft?




          *** (Actually I am compulsive enough to keep written records of use frequency on many products. At my age and frequency of use for this one, given the level of confidence I have in its likely lifespan, it never occurred to me to record use for this one. Thus, I must submit only a calculation. I would be happy to indulge any skeptic the math path, but that would seem more appropriate for a late night campfire venue.)

          Edit: while I personally find that kind of funny it comes across as a snarky poke at the fact that you were asked for some kind of qualification on amount of use when you first submitted the review. This does nothing for the eventual reader that has no idea what you are grumbling about, so I suggest this be taken out.



          ***I don’t know how many Red Snappers I’ve snapped over the years, often owing to urgency.

          EDIT: what are Red Snappers? A brand of plastic trowels? If so say "plastic trowels". We don't compare brands.



          *** The Handy Scoop won’t break or bend, perhaps in part because
          it isn’t big enough to get a lot of leverage.

          EDIT: you need to qualify that to keep from projecting your experience onto the reader. Like this: The Handy Scoop won't break or bend in my experience, perhaps in part because it isn't big enough for me to get a lot of leverage.

          That way it keeps it in the first person and allows for the fact that someone else may well be able to bend the scoop or achieve more leverage.



          *** The small, relativelysharp blade cuts into dirt and humus more easily than a larger blade and won't torque the wrist on hurried excavations.

          Comment: hah, I like that mental image. (Dig fast!)



          ***It isn’t any better than a right angle stick, so the hardest core minimalist cannot be denied his or her objection.

          EDIT: the thought is fine, just find a way to word it that doesn't talk about somebody else's objections. This is about you and your thoughts of the product.



          ***I find it comforting to know I always have digging capacity readily
          at hand for about the weight of a gel.

          EDIT: you should explain that better. Many readers may not know what a gel is. Maybe at least say "an energy gel".
        • never2muchstuff
          Thanks, Ray. I appreciate the time and patience you folks have offered. I ve requested a mentor.
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 1, 2013
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            Thanks, Ray. I appreciate the time and patience you folks have offered. I've requested a mentor.
          • Ray
            OK, sounds good Joe. Just repost the review when you are ready. Ray
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 3, 2013
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              OK, sounds good Joe.

              Just repost the review when you are ready.

              Ray

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "never2muchstuff" wrote:
              >
              > Thanks, Ray. I appreciate the time and patience you folks have offered. I've requested a mentor.
              >
            • never2muchstuff
              Thanks for your help, Ray. Here is the link: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR-MontBell%20Handy%20Scoop/ MONT-BELL HANDY SCOOP
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 6, 2013
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                Thanks for your help, Ray. Here is the link: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR-MontBell%20Handy%20Scoop/


                MONT-BELL HANDY SCOOP


                by Joe Schaffer
                OWNER REVIEW
                March 15, 2013

                TESTER INFORMATION:
                NAME: Joe Schaffer
                EMAIL: never2muchstuff@...
                AGE: 65
                GENDER: Male
                HEIGHT: 5'9" (1.75 m)
                WEIGHT: 175 lb (79.4 kg)
                HOME: Hayward, California USA

                I visit mostly California's central Sierras, camping every month; up to 95 nights a year; about half the time solo. I work part time at an outdoor store. As a comfort camper I lug tent, mattress, chair, etc. Summer trips last typically a week to 10 days; 40 lbs (18 kg), about half food related; about 5 miles (8 kilometers) per hiking day. I winter camp most often at 6,000'-7,000' (1,830-2,135 meters); 2-3 nights; 55 lb (25 kg); 1-4 miles (1.6-6.4 kilometers) on snowshoes.

                The Product
                Manufacturer: Mont-Bell Co., Ltd.
                Web site: http://www.montbell.com
                Product: Handy Scoop
                Year purchased: 2010

                My measures:
                Weight: 1.38 oz (39 gm)
                Length: 6.25" (159 mm)
                Handle length: 3" (76 mm)
                Handle width: 0.83" (22 mm)
                Blade length: 3.25" (83 mm)
                Blade width (max): 1.58" (40 mm)

                Factory specs (from website):
                Weight: 1.4 oz (40 gm)
                Length: 6.25" (159 mm)
                MSRP: $16


                Product Description:

                Curved stainless steel 1 mm thick with plastic-coated handle and a lanyard. The scoop is stamped from a single piece 6.25" (159 mm) long; curved full length at about the round of a person's thumb, allowing the handle to cradle the thumb. The handle is 0.83" (22 mm) wide to its full length of 3" (76 mm) coated with about 0.04" (1 mm) of black plastic, softening the feel of the edges. The top of the handle is drilled with a 0.38" (9.5 mm) hole to accommodate a webbing lanyard 0.63" (16 mm) wide and 5" (127 mm) in circumference. The elliptical blade holds the same curve as the handle; splaying to a maximum width of 1.58" (40 mm) at about the center length of the blade, leading to an apex sharp enough to break through turf.

                Field conditions:

                I've carried this product for about 200 backpacking days, sampling all kinds of conditions from sand to sod.

                Observations:

                I've snapped a lot of plastic trowels over the years, often owing to urgency. Plastic trowels fill the hand and can move a volume of loose dirt; but I find they won't tolerate prying. I've yet to damage the Handy Scoop in any way, perhaps because it is too small in my hand to gain enough leverage. However, it will pry out stones and rubble that would snap the traditional plastic trowel. (The newer recycled Lexan trowels are cheap and strong, but large and heavy; criticisms I find equally applicable to other metal trowels I've tried.) I find it nearly impossible to dig without prying at some point.

                In firm, gravelly dirt I can move material easier and faster with the Handy Scoop. I find the small, relatively sharp blade cuts into dirt and humus more efficiently than a larger blade and doesn't torque the wrist on hurried excavations. While a larger blade has potentially more capacity, the more common conditions seem to prevent loading a large blade to its potential.

                In sand or such the Handy Scoop moves material slower than a larger trowel. However, when the ground is that loose, I find it more convenient just to scrape a hole with a boot heel.

                I'd say it works no better than a right angle stick, but it's comforting always to have digging capacity readily at hand for about the weight of a packet of energy gel.

                Handy Scoop quick shots:

                a) Low weight
                b) Small
                c) Expedient
                d) More $ than a stick
              • Ray
                Hi Joe, This looks very good. The only problem is that the Mont-Bell website URL needs to be an active link (clickable) in your HTML. If you can fix that (and
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 7, 2013
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                  Hi Joe,

                  This looks very good. The only problem is that the Mont-Bell website URL needs to be an active link (clickable) in your HTML.

                  If you can fix that (and test it in the TEST folder to make sure it is working) you can put the corrected version at:

                  Reviews > Personal Hygiene > Trowels > MontBell Handy Scoop

                  Or here: http://tinyurl.com/cc9v4cn

                  Now on to number two!

                  Ray
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