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OR - Snow Peak Giga Stainless Steel Manual Stove - Lori Pontious

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  • Lori
    Here is one I ve been meaning to do for a while. HTML http://tinyurl.com/6oupb86 Text: Snow Peak GigaPower Stainless Steel Stove - Manual Owner Review by Lori
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2012
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      Here is one I've been meaning to do for a while.

      HTML http://tinyurl.com/6oupb86

      Text:
      Snow Peak GigaPower Stainless Steel Stove - Manual
      Owner Review by Lori Pontious

      May 31, 2012





      Tester Information

      NAME: Lori Pontious
      EMAIL: lori.pontious (at) gmail.com
      AGE: 45
      LOCATION: Fresno County, California, USA
      GENDER: F
      HEIGHT: 5'7" (1.7 m)
      WEIGHT: 165 lb (75 kg)

      I've backpacked, camped and fished all over the lower 48 states with
      my family as a kid, and then life happened. I've restarted these
      activities about four years ago - I dayhike or backpack 2-6 times a
      month. I am between light and ultralight. I have a hammock system and
      own a Tarptent. My base weight depends upon season and where I go.

      Product Information


      image
      image courtesy of Snow Peak

      Manufacturer: Snow Peak
      Manufacturer URL: www.snowpeak.com
      Listed Weight: 3.25 ounces (92 g)
      Actual Weight: 3.05 oz (87 g)
      Listed Dimensions: Diameter: 4.2 inches (11 centimeters) Height: 2.6
      inches (7 centimeters)
      Actual Dimensions: Diameter: 4.2 inches (11 centimeters) Height: 2.6
      inches (7 centimeters)
      Materials: Stainless steel, aluminum, brass
      MSRP:
      $39.95


      Product Description
      The Snow Peak GigaPower Manual Stove (hereafter "the stove" or "the
      Giga") mounts on top of an isobutane/propane gas canister; it
      requires a canister fitted with a Lindal self-sealing valve. The
      stove has four trivets that provide support for the pot. The trivets
      have notches to reduce slippage. It does not have an automatic
      lighter and must be lit with a match or lighter.

      image
      The stove is solidly made out of brass, stainless steel and aluminum.
      A rubber gasket around the valve ensures a tight seal when the stove
      is tightened down on the canister. The valve is opened and closed
      with a large stiff wire; turning right increases fuel flow, turning
      left closes the valve. The stove folds up neatly. However, to fold
      the valve handle I have to open the valve slightly before folding.

      The burner is about an inch in diameter. The trivets provide a base
      approximately 4.2 inches (11 centimeters) across on which to place a
      pot. There is an optional windscreen that can be purchased; this is
      made of stainless steel and must be put over the trivets prior to
      extending them fully. The windscreen fits snugly around the burner.
      The stove comes packaged in a white plastic box.

      Field Use
      The GigaPower has been my frequent companion on backpacking trips of
      2 - 4 days in duration, and also goes with me on searches when I am
      volunteering for county Search and Rescue. I have owned the GigaPower
      for about three years now. I have used it at elevations from sea
      level to 11,000 feet (3,353 meters). Temperatures while the stove was
      in use have ranged from 30 to 75 F ( -1 to 24 C). Typically my
      backpacking trips are in the Sierra Nevada mountains in California,
      or in the mountains along the California central coast. I estimate I
      have had the stove out for approximately 20 nights while backpacking.
      I usually use it with a .9 liter titanium pot to boil water, but have
      also used it with a small frypan and a 16 ounce ( .4 liter)
      minimalist pot.

      Review
      The Giga has performed well for me. I light it with a match or a
      lighter. I find that it boils water quickly and efficiently. I've
      used it with various brands of fuel without noticing a difference in
      performance. Setting it up is easy. I ensure the valve is closed,
      screw the stove on top of the canister, open the valve slightly,
      apply flame near the burner, and adjust the gas flow then put the pot
      of water on the trivets. I try to find a flat spot to put the stove
      and canister, usually a granite rock or bare dirt.

      I confess that I have long since misplaced the plastic box it came
      in. I always pack the stove folded and nestled in the pot I'm using
      along with the fuel canister, whether taking the wide titanium .9
      liter pot, the tea kettle, or a narrow solo pot. The stove works well
      with different sizes of cooking vessel, and with the frypan I have
      used while on a fishing trip. The narrow flame pattern is best for
      boiling water, however. This suits me since the majority of my use is
      just that; my meals are usually dehydrated or something like couscous
      that requires addition of hot water, rather than actual cooking on
      the trail.

      I enjoy using the Giga because it is simple to use, relatively
      maintenance free, and light. It takes up hardly any space and the
      trivets are still stable despite being used many times. There is a
      maintenance kit for the stove; it has a replacement gasket and valve
      handle. But I have not yet seen a reason to purchase it. The Giga is
      still in good shape and performs efficiently as it always has. The
      trivets are slightly discolored, as is the burner. The gasket still
      provides a tight seal on the canister.

      The Giga is a well made functional backpacking stove that lacks the
      gadgetry of heavier models, but makes up for it with reliable
      performance and being light, compact and stable.
    • Jamie D.
      PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 3, 2012
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        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community! The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints, to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely manner. Do not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben(at)hotmail.com

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.

        Once your first two Owner Reviews have been approved and you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to Jenn K., the mentor coordinator, at mentor (at) backpackgeartest.org.

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group. These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
        will usually result in a better review, as well as making things easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject line of your re-submitted review if you take this route or make any
        changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups list to keep track of the progress of your Owner Review. Once an Editor has taken your OR and made the necessary edits they will post their comments to the list with EDIT in the subject line. Once you have incorporated these edits into your review please use REPOST in the subject line. When your OR has been approved by the Editor they will use APPROVED in the subject line.

        If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR while it's in the edit queue, the entire Owner Review Queue is posted to this yahoo group list on either Thursdays or Fridays.

        If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask via the list or contact me directly.

        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Editors Team Director
      • Ray
        Hi Lori, Thanks for the Owner Review. I have a few edits for you, after which you may place the corrected review at: Reviews Cook Gear Stoves Snow Peak
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 4, 2012
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          Hi Lori,

          Thanks for the Owner Review. I have a few edits for you, after which you may place the corrected review at:

          Reviews > Cook Gear > Stoves > Snow Peak GigaPower GS-100

          Ray



          *** The stove has four trivets that provide support for the pot. The trivets have notches to reduce slippage.

          EDIT: I would call them pot supports. A trivet is a stand-alone device that holds a pot over a fire (in the outdoor sense, in a kitchen a trivet is a bit different), please look for all instances.



          *** The valve is opened and closed with a large stiff wire; turning right increases fuel flow, turning left closes the valve.

          Comment: are you sure about your directions? Mine is just the opposite. It turns right (clockwise) to close and left to open the fuel.



          ***Temperatures while the stove was in use have ranged from 30 to 75 F ( -1 to 24 C).

          EDIT: delete space at (-1



          *** I usually use it with a .9 liter titanium pot to boil water, but have also used it with a small frypan and a 16 ounce ( .4 liter) minimalist pot.

          EDIT: we are supposed to place a 0 in front of fractional numbers, plus there is another extra space at the ( .4 May want to say "frying pan" too.

          I usually use it with a 0.9 liter titanium pot to boil water, but have also used it with a small frying pan and a 16 ounce (0.4 liter) minimalist pot.
        • Lori
          Hi Ray, I referred to them as trivets because the Snow Peak website does, but, I agree with you - a trivet in a kitchen is a different thing. All done editing
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 5, 2012
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            Hi Ray,

            I referred to them as trivets because the Snow Peak website does,
            but, I agree with you - a trivet in a kitchen is a different thing.

            All done editing - uploaded and deleted from the test folder.

            Thank you for catching my goofs - not sure how I forgot "righty-
            tighty, lefty loosy".

            Lori

            On Jun 4, 2012, at 5:47 AM, Ray wrote:

            >
            > Hi Lori,
            >
            > Thanks for the Owner Review. I have a few edits for you, after
            > which you may place the corrected review at:
            >
            > Reviews > Cook Gear > Stoves > Snow Peak GigaPower GS-100
            >
            > Ray
            >
            > *** The stove has four trivets that provide support for the pot.
            > The trivets have notches to reduce slippage.
            >
            > EDIT: I would call them pot supports. A trivet is a stand-alone
            > device that holds a pot over a fire (in the outdoor sense, in a
            > kitchen a trivet is a bit different), please look for all instances.
            >
            > *** The valve is opened and closed with a large stiff wire; turning
            > right increases fuel flow, turning left closes the valve.
            >
            > Comment: are you sure about your directions? Mine is just the
            > opposite. It turns right (clockwise) to close and left to open the
            > fuel.
            >
            > ***Temperatures while the stove was in use have ranged from 30 to
            > 75 F ( -1 to 24 C).
            >
            > EDIT: delete space at (-1
            >
            > *** I usually use it with a .9 liter titanium pot to boil water,
            > but have also used it with a small frypan and a 16 ounce ( .4
            > liter) minimalist pot.
            >
            > EDIT: we are supposed to place a 0 in front of fractional numbers,
            > plus there is another extra space at the ( .4 May want to say
            > "frying pan" too.
            >
            > I usually use it with a 0.9 liter titanium pot to boil water, but
            > have also used it with a small frying pan and a 16 ounce (0.4
            > liter) minimalist pot.
            >
            >
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          • richardglyon@att.net
            Lori and Ray, Definitely in the style category, and so up to Lori, but you might indicate that Snow Peak calls the pot supports trivets, in case a reader is
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 6, 2012
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              Lori and Ray,

              Definitely in the style category, and so up to Lori, but you might indicate that Snow Peak calls the pot supports "trivets," in case a reader is confused by the manufacturer's odd choice of word.

              Cheers, Richard

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Lori <lori.pontious@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Ray,
              >
              > I referred to them as trivets because the Snow Peak website does,
              > but, I agree with you - a trivet in a kitchen is a different thing.
              >
              > All done editing - uploaded and deleted from the test folder.
              >
              > Thank you for catching my goofs - not sure how I forgot "righty-
              > tighty, lefty loosy".
              >
              > Lori
              >
              > On Jun 4, 2012, at 5:47 AM, Ray wrote:
              >
              > >
              > > Hi Lori,
              > >
              > > Thanks for the Owner Review. I have a few edits for you, after
              > > which you may place the corrected review at:
              > >
              > > Reviews > Cook Gear > Stoves > Snow Peak GigaPower GS-100
              > >
              > > Ray
              > >
              > > *** The stove has four trivets that provide support for the pot.
              > > The trivets have notches to reduce slippage.
              > >
              > > EDIT: I would call them pot supports. A trivet is a stand-alone
              > > device that holds a pot over a fire (in the outdoor sense, in a
              > > kitchen a trivet is a bit different), please look for all instances.
              > >

              >
            • Ray
              Yeah, I am sure something was lost in translation from Japanese to English. What is funnier is that Snow Peak says it has four trivets which would be a total
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 6, 2012
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                Yeah, I am sure something was lost in translation from Japanese to English.

                What is funnier is that Snow Peak says it has "four trivets" which would be a total of 12 legs... ;-)

                Ray

                --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "richardglyon@..." <montana.angler@...> wrote:
                >
                > Lori and Ray,
                >
                > Definitely in the style category, and so up to Lori, but you might indicate that Snow Peak calls the pot supports "trivets," in case a reader is confused by the manufacturer's odd choice of word.
                >
                > Cheers, Richard
                >
                > --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Lori <lori.pontious@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Ray,
                > >
                > > I referred to them as trivets because the Snow Peak website does,
                > > but, I agree with you - a trivet in a kitchen is a different thing.
                > >
                > > All done editing - uploaded and deleted from the test folder.
                > >
                > > Thank you for catching my goofs - not sure how I forgot "righty-
                > > tighty, lefty loosy".
                > >
                > > Lori
                > >
                > > On Jun 4, 2012, at 5:47 AM, Ray wrote:
                > >
                > > >
                > > > Hi Lori,
                > > >
                > > > Thanks for the Owner Review. I have a few edits for you, after
                > > > which you may place the corrected review at:
                > > >
                > > > Reviews > Cook Gear > Stoves > Snow Peak GigaPower GS-100
                > > >
                > > > Ray
                > > >
                > > > *** The stove has four trivets that provide support for the pot.
                > > > The trivets have notches to reduce slippage.
                > > >
                > > > EDIT: I would call them pot supports. A trivet is a stand-alone
                > > > device that holds a pot over a fire (in the outdoor sense, in a
                > > > kitchen a trivet is a bit different), please look for all instances.
                > > >
                >
                > >
                >
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