Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

EDIT - Timberland Flume hiking boots - Erin Hedden

Expand Messages
  • richardglyon
    Erin, Before I can edit your review I need you to correct the two items I mentioned in my first post (quoted below), and one more: your Backpacking Background
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 6 5:38 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Erin,

      Before I can edit your review I need you to correct the two items I mentioned in my first post (quoted below), and one more: your Backpacking Background is 129 words, well over our 100-word limit. Please revise accordingly. When you've fixed all of these please (1) repost to this list, with REPOST, the product name, and your name in the title, and (2) include a link in the body of the post to the html version of the revised review, in html format, in the Tests/Owner Reviews folder.

      Quoting from my first edit: "This Review requires some additions to conform to BGT's requirements. I appreciate that with four years' use you can't recall every set of conditions in which you've worn them, but we do require some specifics: temperature range and trail conditions [mud, snow, rock, street, packed dirt]. You've included some of this at various places in your Review, but the Review would be easier to follow if all Field Conditions were set out in one section. Also consider adding the type of sock you wear with the Flumes, and your usual pack weight (or weight range) when hiking in them.

      You should also include a paragraph or section on how you've cared for the
      Flumes over the past four years, especially since you refer to 'proper care and treatment.'"

      Thanks, Richard
    • Tookie Hedden
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Timberland%20Flume%20Hiking%20Boot/ TIMBERLAND FLUME HIKING BOOTS BY ERIN M. HEDDEN OR
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 7 11:47 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Timberland%20Flume%20Hiking%20Boot/


        TIMBERLAND FLUME HIKING BOOTS
        BY ERIN M. HEDDEN
        OR
        January 31, 2011

        TESTER INFORMATION

        NAME: Erin M. Hedden
        EMAIL: tookieblueeyes@...
        AGE: 32
        LOCATION: Colorado
        GENDER: F
        HEIGHT: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
        WEIGHT: 153 lb (69.40 kg)

        Backpacking Background: I have been backpacking since I was 4 years old, taking trips into the mountains for week long stays at a time with my family. I hike various terrains throughout Colorado from mountains and plateaus to grasslands and prairies. I live in Southeastern Colorado in the United States, though I try to spend as much time in the Rocky Mountains which are just an hours drive away. My excursions can be a day hike with a waist pack, a loop trail with 3 nights camping between start and finish, or an in and out trip which can range from an overnighter to 4 nights camping. Depending on the area and weather I use a tent or go hammock camping if I would rather stay up off of the ground.

        PRODUCT INFORMATION

        Manufacturer: Timberland Company
        Year of Manufacture: 2007
        Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.timberland.com">>
        MSRP: US $90.00
        Listed Weight: 2 lbs 5 oz (1.05 kg) Per Boot
        Measured Weight: 2 lbs 3 oz (0.99 kg) Per Boot
        Material: Leather & Mesh Uppers
        Color: Brown/Black
        Size: 8 US Men's
        Timberland offers the Flume in mens' sizes only, from size 7 Medium to size 13 Medium.
        I purchased Men's size 8 because ever since childhood I have always worn men's footwear. I am more comfortable in mens' shoes for the most part.
        Product Description:
        According to Timberlands website it boasts that one could "trudge through icy puddles and across frozen streets without a second thought". So with the multidirectional rubber lug outsole to give you traction on slippery surfaces, and being made of premium high quality leather with mesh uppers they are not only comfortable they are waterproof and are said to be abrasion resistant too. They are constructed with seam-sealed outers and a moisture-wicking lining inside which is made from 50% recycled PET. The footpad is removable while the padded collar and gusseted tongue adds to comfort. On the outsole the lugs are strategically placed so that they follow the curved center of pressure and the four natural motions of ones own foot, this is to improve traction and to extend the wearing performance of the boot itself. It is a tread pattern unique to Timberland, and it works!
        <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1" IMAGE CAPTION = "New">><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 4" IMAGE CAPTION = "Unique Tread Pattern">>

        FIELD USE

        I purchased these boots 4 years ago and the first day out of the box they were used on a 12 mile hike through the canyons in Eastern Colorado and despite the fact that they had no time to be broken in, rather they were thrown right into the fire with this hike, they proved themselves well when I came out of the canyons without any blisters on my feet. Since buying them they have carried me up steep mountain trails and down scree slopes through the high Wet Mountains as well as the Sangre De Cristo mountains range as well. Crossing streams and rivers and even standing in bogs they have been put to the test and stressed to the limits over the last 4 years.

        Not only did I not experience any aches and pains the first time out with these boots I have never had a problem since their purchase either. They've proven to be quite comfortable as well as being quite at ease rock-hopping through the canyons and ravines near my home as well as trotting along the beaten switch back paths found in the mountains.

        I've worn them out in plenty of snowstorms over the 4 year span of time in which they have been in my service and they have experienced temperatures of down to 15 degrees below 0 and there were no run-ins with leather cracking or becoming brittle after they became wet then set up in the cold temperatures. I generally wear wool socks during the winter months while out and about with these boots on.

        On an ice fishing trips out onto the thick ice of North Lake where the temperature was 5 degrees below 0, they stood up to the cold and the wind and kept my feet from freezing while I stood there on the ice with my three foot pole and a hole in the ice.

        During the summer months in the canyons where I spend a great deal of time the temperature gets up to 110 degrees ferinheit during the heat of the day and the boots were subjected to everything from loose gravel and sand to hard packed trail and sandstone. In these conditions I dawn cotton socks to prevent sweating profusely.

        FIELD CONDITIONS

        I've worn the Timberland Flume Hiking Boots on the streets and sidewalks of towns and cities as well as on trails that were hard packed dirt, some that were covered with gravel and were well kept and on some trails that were more like game trails than actual hiking trails, sometimes scrambling over tree roots and sandstone slabs.

        Many times I have run into bad weather and had to pick my way over muddy trails that were more like bogs while avoiding spills into the meyer since the soil is clay in the canyons and it can prove quite difficult to navigate over, around and through without at least slipping and falling at least once or twice for every 2 miles of travel. Sometimes the trail would get bad enough that I would pick my way through the prairie grasses, cactus, sage brush and rabbit brush that commonly surrounds the trails in Southeastern Colorado rather than sink ankle deep in the muck.

        The snow in my area is generally heavy and wet and quickly ices over with the cold temperatures of the evening and nights here. There have been several times that the boots became saturated in the heavy snow but my feet would remain dry, which I was quite appreciative of since the temperatures were quite balmy at the time ranging anywhere from 10 degrees Fahrenheit to 15 degrees below 0. As long as I had gaiters on there were never any problems with wet feet at the end of the journey.

        I've covered everything from sub alpine forest to sandy lake shores, sidewalks to shale slopes and everything in between.<<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 3" IMAGE CAPTION = "4 Years & Still Hiking">><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2" IMAGE CAPTION = "Well Used">>

        SUMMARY

        In summation I feel that it is safe to say that the Timberland Flume is a very comfortable fit for me, it has withstood the test of time, many trails and many miles off trail as well. When Timberland promised the boots were made of premium leather and were seam-sealed to be waterproof they delivered on that promise still today, 4 years later. Timberland designed and produced a very versatile and durable hiking boot that I plan on employing on many more trips out on both the beaten path as well as the paths I make for myself.

        THINGS I LIKE

        1. The high quality construction of the boots.
        2. The comfort is phenomenal.
        3. The long lasting life of the sole.
        4. Being waterproof and remaining to be waterproof over 4 years and running.
        5. The sleek look.
        6. The ease of breaking them in.
        7. Their versatility.

        THINGS I DON'T LIKE

        1. If I had to choose one thing I disliked about these hiking boots' it would be the fact that the company boasted about the boots' premium leather being abrasion resistant when in fact after year 2 they began scuffing on the toe portion of the boot even with the proper care and treatment provided.

        CARE PROVIDED

        To test the Timberland Company's claim I never applied any waterproofing to the boots but rather relied on the claim that they were indeed waterproof upon purchase, however, I did clean them regularly with a soft toothbrush after each use by cleaning away any mud and dirt that was stuck on the boots and pulling out any rocks that were wedged into the lugs on the soles.

        I never applied any high heat to the boots to dry them off after they became wet, rather I allowed them to dry naturally.



        This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
        Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.

        To: BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com
        From: montana.angler@...
        Date: Mon, 7 Feb 2011 01:38:52 +0000
        Subject: [BackpackGearTest] EDIT - Timberland Flume hiking boots - Erin Hedden




























        Erin,



        Before I can edit your review I need you to correct the two items I mentioned in my first post (quoted below), and one more: your Backpacking Background is 129 words, well over our 100-word limit. Please revise accordingly. When you've fixed all of these please (1) repost to this list, with REPOST, the product name, and your name in the title, and (2) include a link in the body of the post to the html version of the revised review, in html format, in the Tests/Owner Reviews folder.



        Quoting from my first edit: "This Review requires some additions to conform to BGT's requirements. I appreciate that with four years' use you can't recall every set of conditions in which you've worn them, but we do require some specifics: temperature range and trail conditions [mud, snow, rock, street, packed dirt]. You've included some of this at various places in your Review, but the Review would be easier to follow if all Field Conditions were set out in one section. Also consider adding the type of sock you wear with the Flumes, and your usual pack weight (or weight range) when hiking in them.



        You should also include a paragraph or section on how you've cared for the

        Flumes over the past four years, especially since you refer to 'proper care and treatment.'"



        Thanks, Richard


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • richardglyon
        Erin, Some progress, but some basics that still must be corrected. 1. As noted on the last go-round, your Backpacking Background is 129 words, well over our
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 8 11:24 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Erin,

          Some progress, but some basics that still must be corrected.

          1. As noted on the last go-round, your Backpacking Background is 129 words, well over our 100-word limit. Pare it back. Or you could substitute the Backpacking Background section from your Red Stat Review, which is acceptable. As this section needs to be redone completely I am not including specific edits from it in this posting. But see item 4 below.

          2. Just as all measurements must be in a prescribed format and require a conversion (metric to Imperial or vice versa), all temperatures must be in a prescribed format [no inclusion of "degrees" or the symbol for degrees; a space and C or F after the digits] and require a conversion from Celsius to Fahrenheit or vice versa. So – "-15 F (-26 C)" not "15 degrees below zero." This requires several changes in your Review. All the BGT conventions may be found at the foot of the conversion tool page on BackpackGearTest.org.

          3. Photos from a manufacturer's website, such as the two of "new" boots in your Review must be attributed to the manufacturer, either in the caption for the photo or in the text of the review.

          4. All of the three prior issues are specifically addressed in the Survivor Guide on the BGT website. BEFORE re-submitting this Review for edit, I want you to read the Survival Guide carefully and do your best to comply with ALL our protocols. This isn't merely rote adherence to mindless rules; relatively standard formatting and required content enable BGT to maintain its standards, which in turn allows us to attract manufacturers with gear to test. We editors should only have to address required changes in text, not basic formatting.

          5. Thanks for adding the Field Conditions section. After revising as directed in this post, could you place it above the Field Use section. I'd rename the Field Use section "Observations" or "Review," but that is up to you.

          6. Specific edits follow. After revising, please repost here, as before, and include a tinyurl link to the html version.

          Cheers, Richard

          <<Timberland offers the Flume in mens' sizes only, from size 7 Medium to size 13 Medium. I purchased Men's size 8 because ever since childhood I have always worn men's footwear. I am more comfortable in mens' shoes for the most part.>>
          EDIT: men's [in two places, first and third of quoted portion]

          <<So with the multidirectional rubber lug outsole to give you traction on slippery surfaces, >>
          EDIT: BGT doesn't allow projection – reporting on what another person might experience. Any use of "you" or "your" raises such an issue. "outsole to provide traction" works.

          <<On the outsole the lugs are strategically placed so that they follow the curved center of pressure and the four natural motions of ones own foot,>>
          EDIT: one's own [with an apostrophe]

          <<Not only did I not experience any aches and pains the first time out with these boots I have never had a problem since their purchase either.>>
          EDIT: my purchase

          << In these conditions I dawn cotton socks to prevent sweating profusely.>>
          EDIT: don cotton socks [An example of why a spell checker doesn't always work.]

          <<Many times I have run into bad weather and had to pick my way over muddy trails that were more like bogs while avoiding spills into the meyer since the soil is clay in the canyons >>
          EDIT: spills into the mire [spelling]

          <<I've covered everything from sub alpine forest to sandy lake shores, >>
          Edit: subalpine [one word] or sub-alpine [with a hyphen]

          <<1. If I had to choose one thing I disliked about these hiking boots' it would be the fact>>
          EDIT: these hiking boots [no apostrophe]

          <<CARE PROVIDED>>
          EDIT: Move this section so that it precedes your Likes and Dislikes.
        • Tookie Hedden
          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Timberland%20Flume%20Hiking%20Boot/ TIMBERLAND FLUME HIKING BOOTS BY ERIN M. HEDDEN OR
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 8 7:20 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Timberland%20Flume%20Hiking%20Boot/


            TIMBERLAND FLUME HIKING BOOTS
            BY ERIN M. HEDDEN
            OR
            January 31, 2011

            TESTER INFORMATION

            NAME: Erin M. Hedden
            EMAIL: tookieblueeyes@...
            AGE: 32
            LOCATION: Southeastern Colorado U.S.A.
            GENDER: F
            HEIGHT: 5' 9" (1.75 m)
            WEIGHT: 153 lb (69.40 kg)

            Backpacking Background: I have been backpacking since I was 4 years old, taking trips into the mountains for week long stays at a time with my family. I hike various terrains throughout Colorado from mountains and plateaus to grasslands and prairies. My excursions can be a day hike with a waist pack, a loop trail with 3 nights camping between start and finish, or an in and out trip which can range from an overnighter to 4 nights camping. Depending on the area and weather I use a tent or go hammock camping if I would rather stay up off of the ground.

            PRODUCT INFORMATION

            Manufacturer: Timberland Company
            Year of Manufacture: 2007
            Manufacturer's Website: <<HYPERLINK GOES HERE - "http://www.timberland.com">>
            MSRP: US $90.00
            Listed Weight: 2 lbs 5 oz (1.05 kg) Per Boot
            Measured Weight: 2 lbs 3 oz (0.99 kg) Per Boot
            Material: Leather & Mesh Uppers
            Color: Brown/Black
            Size: 8 US Men's
            Timberland offers the Flume in men's sizes only, from size 7 Medium to size 13 Medium.
            I purchased Men's size 8 because ever since childhood I have always worn men's footwear. I am more comfortable in men's shoes for the most part.
            Product Description:
            According to Timberlands website it boasts that one could "trudge through icy puddles and across frozen streets without a second thought". So with the multidirectional rubber lug outsole to give traction on slippery surfaces, and being made of premium high quality leather with mesh uppers they are not only comfortable they are waterproof and are said to be abrasion resistant too. They are constructed with seam-sealed outers and a moisture-wicking lining inside which is made from 50% recycled PET. The footpad is removable while the padded collar and gusseted tongue adds to comfort. On the outsole the lugs are strategically placed so that they follow the curved center of pressure and the four natural motions of one's own foot, this is to improve traction and to extend the wearing performance of the boot itself. It is a tread pattern unique to Timberland, and it works!
            <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 1" IMAGE CAPTION = "Photo from Timberland Company">><<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 4" IMAGE CAPTION = "Photo from Timberland Company">>

            FIELD CONDITIONS

            I've worn the Timberland Flume Hiking Boots on the streets and sidewalks of towns and cities as well as on trails that were hard packed dirt, some that were covered with gravel and were well kept and on some trails that were more like game trails than actual hiking trails, sometimes scrambling over tree roots and sandstone slabs.

            Many times I have run into bad weather and had to pick my way over muddy trails that were more like bogs while avoiding spills into the mire since the soil is clay in the canyons and it can prove quite difficult to navigate over, around and through without at least slipping and falling at least once or twice for every 2 miles (3.22 km) of travel. Sometimes the trail would get bad enough that I would pick my way through the prairie grasses, cactus, sage brush and rabbit brush that commonly surrounds the trails in Southeastern Colorado rather than sink ankle deep in the muck.

            The snow in my area is generally heavy and wet and quickly ices over with the cold temperatures of the evening and nights here. There have been several times that the boots became saturated in the heavy snow but my feet would remain dry, which I was quite appreciative of since the temperatures were quite balmy at the time ranging anywhere from 10 F (-12 C)to -15 F (-26 C). As long as I had gaiters on there were never any problems with wet feet at the end of the journey.

            I've covered everything from sub-alpine forest to sandy lake shores, sidewalks to shale slopes and everything in between.

            OBSERVATIONS

            I purchased these boots 4 years ago and the first day out of the box they were used on a 12 mile (19.32 km) hike through the canyons in Eastern Colorado and despite the fact that they had no time to be broken in, rather they were thrown right into the fire with this hike, they proved themselves well when I came out of the canyons without any blisters on my feet. Since buying them they have carried me up steep mountain trails and down scree slopes through the high Wet Mountains as well as the Sangre De Cristo mountains range as well. Crossing streams and rivers and even standing in bogs they have been put to the test and stressed to the limits over the last 4 years.

            Not only did I not experience any aches and pains the first time out with these boots I have never had a problem since my purchase either. They've proven to be quite comfortable as well as being quite at ease rock-hopping through the canyons and ravines near my home as well as trotting along the beaten switch back paths found in the mountains.

            I've worn them out in plenty of snowstorms over the 4 year span of time in which they have been in my service and they have experienced temperatures of down to -15 F (-26 C) and there were no run-ins with leather cracking or becoming brittle after they became wet then set up in the cold temperatures. I generally wear wool socks during the winter months while out and about with these boots on.

            On an ice fishing trips out onto the thick ice of North Lake where the temperature was -5 F below 0 (-21 C), they stood up to the cold and the wind and kept my feet from freezing while I stood there on the ice with my three foot pole and a hole in the ice. <<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 3" IMAGE CAPTION = "4 Years & Still Hiking">>

            During the summer months in the canyons where I spend a great deal of time the temperature gets up to 110 F (43 C) during the heat of the day and the boots were subjected to everything from loose gravel and sand to hard packed trail and sandstone. In these conditions I don cotton socks to prevent sweating profusely.

            SUMMARY

            In summation I feel that it is safe to say that the Timberland Flume is a very comfortable fit for me, it has withstood the test of time, many trails and many miles off trail as well. When Timberland promised the boots were made of premium leather and were seam-sealed to be waterproof they delivered on that promise still today, 4 years later. Timberland designed and produced a very versatile and durable hiking boot that I plan on employing on many more trips out on both the beaten path as well as the paths I make for myself.

            CARE PROVIDED

            To test the Timberland Company's claim I never applied any waterproofing to the boots but rather relied on the claim that they were indeed waterproof upon purchase, however, I did clean them regularly with a soft toothbrush after each use by cleaning away any mud and dirt that was stuck on the boots and pulling out any rocks that were wedged into the lugs on the soles.

            I never applied any high heat to the boots to dry them off after they became wet, rather I allowed them to dry naturally.


            THINGS I LIKE

            1. The high quality construction of the boots.
            2. The comfort is phenomenal.
            3. The long lasting life of the sole.
            4. Being waterproof and remaining to be waterproof over 4 years and running.
            5. The sleek look.
            6. The ease of breaking them in.
            7. Their versatility.<<IMAGE GOES HERE. ALT TEXT = "IMAGE 2" IMAGE CAPTION = "Well Used">>


            THINGS I DON'T LIKE

            1. If I had to choose one thing I disliked about these hiking boots it would be the fact that the company boasted about the boots' premium leather being abrasion resistant when in fact after year 2 they began scuffing on the toe portion of the boot even with the proper care and treatment provided.



            This report was created with the BGT Report Generator.
            Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.