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OR - Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006)

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  • mistlail@yahoo.co.uk
    Here is my first owner review, ready for editing (note: text in braces, some asterisks, &c. won t be visible in the html version; it s used for formatting).
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 19, 2009
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      Here is my first owner review, ready for editing (note: text in braces, some asterisks, &c. won't be visible in the html version; it's used for formatting).

      I'm not sure if the review date is intended to be the date of publication or the date of composition. I mention this because I actually wrote it many months ago (finally getting around to submitting it).

      Thanks,
      Leif

      ===========================
      Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006)
      [An innovative 35 L backpack with excellent ventilation.]{.plain}
      ===========================

      **18 Dec 2009**


      Reviewer Information
      ====================

      Name: Leif LeBaron
      Age: 37
      Gender: Male
      Height: 183 cm (6')
      Weight: 70 kg (155 lb)
      E-mail: (to be included in HTML version)
      Home: West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
      {.compact}

      Backpacking Background: I began backpacking in my teenage years, and hiking, years before that. I backpack while travelling in both urban and wilderness environments. My travels have taken me through a wide range of landscapes, both in North America and overseas. I'm generally comfortable in the wilderness and I enjoy extreme terrain and weather but I'm not an ice climber or a peak bagger. In 1999, I became interested in reducing my load and I now go more or less ultralight. I sleep in a hammock.


      Product Information
      ====================

      Manufacturer: Osprey Packs
      Year of Manufacture: 2006
      Manufacturer's Website: www.ospreypacks.com
      Listed Weight: 1.16 kg (2 lb 9 oz)
      Measured Weight: 1.2 kg (2 lb 10 oz)
      Size: medium
      Capacity: 35 L (2100 cu in)
      Type: panel loading
      {.compact}

      ![](osprey-atmos-35.jpg)
      Photo: Osprey Packs


      Review
      ====================

      I used the pack during three separate trips on the Hawaiian islands, and numerous small trips in British Columbia. I was hiking in varied conditions throughout a wide range of terrain, elevation and weather.

      I purchased an Osprey Atmos pack primarily because of the ventilated suspension. An open mesh is stretched over a lightweight aluminum frame. The shoulder straps and hip belt pads are textured and perforated.

      The construction is excellent. The fabric is light but it has endured significant stress without fail. There are two layers of fabric on the bottom panel of the pack.

      Panel Loading
      --------------------------

      My Atmos is a panel loading. The main compartment has two large zippers which caused me no trouble and I found the contents to be very accessible. This was especially useful when conditions prevented the unloading of pack contents (i.e., for lack of a clean and dry place to put them); something which is very difficult if not impossible with a top-loading pack.

      The zippers run down each side, not all the way to the bottom but low enough that contents can be accessed without unpacking. *Note: Newer models have shorter zippers, effectively making the pack panel-loading at the top and top-loading at the bottom.*

      Fit
      --------------------------

      Having grown accustomed to the excellent range of motion in the "floating" hip belts of Arc'teryx packs, I found the Atmos hip belt to be somewhat restrictive but I do find it more comfortable and ergonomic than many other packs which I've used. However, in practice, I usually carry a light load and often leave the hip belt unfastened.

      I do appreciate the straps on the hip belt which slide freely over each side of the buckle and run back to the pad. This arrangement spreads the stress across the pad, so it hugs the top edge of the pelvis rather than pressing in the middle. It also means the straps are tightened by pulling in the opposite (and more comfortable) direction.

      The ventilated shoulder straps were mostly comfortable, though perhaps riding a little to wide on my shoulders (which was only a problem if the chest strap was open). The lower end of the shoulder pad (where the lower strap is attached) protruded enough to give me some grief during extended hikes; I think that detail could be improved.

      Pockets & Straps
      --------------------------

      There is one zippered pocket inside the pack. It is quite small but well designed, accessible from both inside and outside, with mesh fabric on the inner surface for visibility of contents, and a key clip. The outer zipper is urethane-coated for water resistance.

      The hip belt has a zippered mesh pocket on each side. I found these to be quite useful for carrying energy bars and other small items for frequent access.

      There is a large outer back pocket made of elastic fabric. The design includes a folded lip which helps keep things from escaping. The lip is also attached to a compression strap which connects to the top of the pack, running over the zipper of the small inner pocket. This appears to be a possible nuisance but I like it; especially, because the long compression strap provides a place to put a frequently used jacket or the like. *Note: Newer models have a much shorter strap which attaches below the zipper.*

      There are two outer side pockets made of elastic fabric. They worked well for me. Compression straps run across the openings; initially, I thought this might be a problem, but I came to appreciate the arrangement. *Note: The straps on newer models can be threaded over or under the pocket.*

      There is a deep and narrow inner pocket for a water bladder but I did not use it for water or for anything which I needed to access frequently. There are also two small straps to optionally attach a water bladder in the ventilated air space created by the frame. There is an opening at the top of the pack for a water tube, and elastic loops along the shoulder straps.

      There are two removable straps at the bottom of the pack, apparently for a sleeping pad, but I found the location to be awkward and I preferred to use the top strap of the outer pocket.

      I never carried an ice axe but I occasionally made use of those attachments to fasten other things.

      Shape
      --------------------------

      I developed a great appreciation for the smooth, rounded profile which allowed me to duck under branches and drop over ledges and logs with greater ease than any other pack I've used. The pack also performed well at shedding branches and other potential snags. *Note: to date, all newer models of the Atmos 35 have a more conventional protruding profile on the top.*

      It does protrude in the back but I only found that to be an occasional problem in urban environments. This humpiness is partly related to the frame which maintains a ventilation space behind the back. This space appears to be perhaps too large when looking at it but it is reduced when the pack is actually worn.

      Frame
      --------------------------

      The internal aluminum frame is strong enough for its intended purpose but it is vulnerable (don't sit on it!). My pack once became stuck in an airport x-ray machine and the conveyor belt compressed it with enough force to distort the aluminum frame.

      This prompted me to remove and disassemble the frame which consists of two bent aluminum tubes connected by two short titanium rods. I noticed that these rods were greased and that the grease had spread onto the fabric which is likely to cause long-term problems. I removed the grease and replaced its function by applying bushings of heat-shrink tubing (the kind used in electronics) to the ends of the rods (it fit perfectly).

      Finally, I bent the frame back into shape and subsequently decided to modify it to improve the geometry and increase the tension on the mesh back panel (which had over time become somewhat less than taut). During this process, I removed and replaced the frame several times. I am pleased that the frame is removable and I think it's an important point to note, as eventually it will very likely require adjustment. *Note: the frame on the 2009 Atmos is different and and apparently improved (though I don't expect it to much less vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).*

      Air Travel
      --------------------------

      Air travellers should note that the medium size conforms almost exactly to the upper limit of common carry-on luggage dimensions: 56 x 36 x 23 cm (22 x 14 x 9 in.). The large size exceeds this, but not by much.


      Summary
      --------------------------

      I remain pleased with my Osprey Atmos pack and I recommend it. It's not ultralight but it is lightweight, ventilated and durable, ready to go cross country off the beaten trail, and carry on in the urban jungle. Osprey has revised the model at least twice, making some things better and others worse (as noted throughout the review).

      --- Good

      - excellent ventilation
      - smooth profile (not easily caught on things)
      - fits airline carry-on dimensions
      - panel loading

      --- Bad

      - weight (it's lighter than most but it could be lighter still)
      - hip belt is somewhat restrictive
      - frame is vulnerable to being bent out of shape
      - shoulder straps could be more comfortable
    • chcoa
      PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 29, 2009
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        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community! The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints, to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely manner. Do not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben(at)hotmail.com

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.

        Once your first two Owner Reviews have been approved and you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to Jenn K., the mentor coordinator, at mentor (at) backpackgeartest.org.

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group. These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
        will usually result in a better review, as well as making things easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject line of your re-submitted review if you take this route or make any
        changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups list to keep track of the progress of your Owner Review. Once an Editor has taken your OR and made the necessary edits they will post their comments to the list with EDIT in the subject line. Once you have incorporated these edits into your review please use REPOST in the subject line. When your OR has been approved by the Editor they will use APPROVED in the subject line.

        If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR while it's in the edit queue, the entire Owner Review Queue is posted to this yahoo group list on either Thursdays or Fridays.

        If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask via the list or contact me directly.

        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Edit Administration Manager
      • chcoa
        Hi Leif, I have added your first review to the edit queue and you should see a proper edit here in a few days. I noticed on thing right off you will need to
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 29, 2009
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          Hi Leif,

          I have added your first review to the edit queue and you should see a proper edit here in a few days. I noticed on thing right off you will need to expand on and normally I would ask before adding you to the queue but figured I go about it this way instead. Please going back through your report and elaborate on the amount of days you have used this pack. Your field info. is a little vague and I'm sure your editor will ask you to expand on that a bit.

          If you decide to do this before it get's picked up by an editor please use the word REVISE in your subject line when you repost it to the yahoo group so I know you have changed something pre-edit.

          Thanks and welcome to BGT.
          Jamie D
          Edit Admin Manager
        • a_henrichs
          Hello Leif, Welcome to BGT! Getting started can be a daunting process, but you have a pretty good start. Don t get discouraged early on. Once you learn the
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 18, 2010
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            Hello Leif,

            Welcome to BGT! Getting started can be a daunting process, but you have a pretty good start. Don't get discouraged early on. Once you learn the ropes, things get a lot easier. Generally, ORs need to be on products less than 2 years old. Since this pack is still in production with minimal changes, it should be acceptable. Just for future reference, make sure your future ORs are on current products.

            You do an excellent job of describing the pack but, as Jamie noted, your personal experiences in the field are not described much. Please flesh out these experiences a little more. If you're not sure what to add, take a look at some of the Long Term Reports for test items to see what other folks have included.

            Generally, the edit process consists of 3 things. EDIT=change, Edit=think about changing, and Comment=a comment. Once you have added some more of your field experience and made the edits found below, please repost your report to this list with REVISED added to the beginning of the subject line. Also, please post an html version of your report at the backpackgeartest.org website. Log in, and upload it under the test/OWNER REVIEW folder. Please post a tinyurl.com link (or equivalent) in your repost.

            You have a good start! I'm looking forward to reading your revised version!

            Andy



            > I used the pack during three separate trips on the Hawaiian islands, and numerous small trips in British Columbia. I was hiking in varied conditions throughout a wide range of terrain, elevation and weather.
            EDIT: How many days of use have you had? How many times per trip? Even if you don't have an exact number, please approximate to the best of your ability. Also, can you list examples of elevations, terrain, and weather? Even a quick list (rain, snow, wind, rainforest, desert, elevation range, etc) is helpful.


            >
            > My Atmos is a panel loading.
            EDIT: Should probably be either panel loader or panel loading pack

            > I do appreciate the straps on the hip belt which slide freely over each side of the buckle and run back to the pad. This arrangement spreads the stress across the pad, so it hugs the top edge of the pelvis rather than pressing in the middle. It also means the straps are tightened by pulling in the opposite (and more comfortable) direction.
            Edit: You may want to clarify this. ie: the straps are tightened by pulling across your body

            > The ventilated shoulder straps were mostly comfortable, though perhaps riding a little to wide on my shoulders (which was only a problem if the chest strap was open).
            EDIT: a little too wide...

            > The lower end of the shoulder pad (where the lower strap is attached) protruded enough to give me some grief during extended hikes; I think that detail could be improved.
            EDIT: How did it give you grief? Did it rub? If so, where?

            This appears to be a possible nuisance but I like it; especially, because the long compression strap provides a place to put a frequently used jacket or the like.
            Edit: You may want to change the punctuation here. The combination of ; and , makes it read a little funny.

            >Compression straps run across the openings; initially, I thought this might be a problem, but I came to appreciate the arrangement.
            Edit: Same thing. Think about a . in place of the ;

            > There is a deep and narrow inner pocket for a water bladder but I did not use it for water or for anything which I needed to access frequently. There are also two small straps to optionally attach a water bladder in the ventilated air space created by the frame. There is an opening at the top of the pack for a water tube, and elastic loops along the shoulder straps.
            EDIT: Is it easy to get a water bladder inside this air space? Full or empty?

            > Finally, I bent the frame back into shape and subsequently decided to modify it to improve the geometry and increase the tension on the mesh back panel (which had over time become somewhat less than taut). During this process, I removed and replaced the frame several times. I am pleased that the frame is removable and I think it's an important point to note, as eventually it will very likely require adjustment. *Note: the frame on the 2009 Atmos is different and and apparently improved (though I don't expect it to much less vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).*
            Edit: Were there directions on how to remove the frame or did you just figure it out as you went?
          • mistlail
            ... =========================== Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006) =========================== An innovative 35 L backpack with excellent ventilation. **18 Dec 2009**
            Message 5 of 13 , Feb 1, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
              ===========================
              Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006)
              ===========================

              An innovative 35 L backpack with excellent ventilation.

              **18 Dec 2009**


              Reviewer
              ====================

              Name: Leif LeBaron
              Age: 37
              Gender: Male
              Height: 183 cm (6')
              Weight: 70 kg (155 lb)
              E-mail: (to be included in HTML version)
              Home: West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
              {.compact}

              Backpacking Background: I began backpacking in my teenage years, and hiking, years before that. I backpack while travelling in both urban and wilderness environments. My travels have taken me through a wide range of landscapes, both in North America and overseas. I generally feel at home in the wilderness and I enjoy extreme terrain and weather but I'm not an ice climber nor a peak bagger. In 1999, I became interested in reducing my load and I now go more or less ultralight. I sleep in a hammock.


              Product
              ====================

              ![](osprey-atmos-35.jpg)
              [Photo: Osprey Packs]{style="margin-right:4em"}
              {style="float:right;text-align:right;margin:0 -4em 3em 1.5em"}

              Manufacturer: Osprey Packs
              Year of Manufacture: 2006
              Manufacturer's Website: www.ospreypacks.com
              Listed Weight: 1.16 kg (2 lb 9 oz)
              Measured Weight: 1.2 kg (2 lb 10 oz)
              Size: medium
              Capacity: 35 L (2100 cu in)
              Type: panel loading
              {.compact}

              Review
              ====================

              I used this pack during three separate trips (approximately four months total duration) on the Hawaiian islands, and during numerous shorter trips in British Columbia throughout the seasons. This has been my primary pack for the past three years, used in varied conditions throughout a wide range of terrain, elevation and weather.

              I purchased an Osprey Atmos pack primarily because of the ventilated suspension. An open mesh is stretched over a lightweight aluminum frame. The shoulder straps and hip belt pads are textured and perforated. I do not recommend the pack for use with snow because it may collect in the air space beneath the mesh back panel. In cold conditions (regardless of snow) ventilation seems unnecessary and I would prefer to remove the space, bringing the load closer to the body. Occasionally, I had to remove twigs and other small debris from the space but that was easy and infrequent.

              The construction is excellent. Stitching is strong and binding tape covers all seams. The fabric is light but it has endured significant stress without fail. There are two layers of fabric on the bottom panel of the pack. The fabric is waterproof (coated inside with urethane) but I would expect some leakage even in light rain. I kept mine dry under a poncho; however, on several occasions the pack was splashed by rogue waves and endured mist and light drizzle without significant leakage.


              Panel Loading
              --------------------------

              My Atmos is a panel loader. The main compartment has two large zippers which caused me no trouble and I found the contents to be very accessible. This was especially useful when conditions prevented the unloading of pack contents (i.e., for lack of a clean and dry place to put them); something which is very difficult if not impossible with a top-loading pack.

              The zippers run down each side, not all the way to the bottom but low enough that contents can be accessed without unpacking. *Note: Newer models have shorter zippers, effectively making the pack panel-loading at the top and top-loading at the bottom.*

              Fit
              --------------------------

              Having grown accustomed to the excellent range of motion in the "floating" hip belts of Arc'teryx packs, I found the Atmos hip belt to be somewhat restrictive but also more comfortable and ergonomic than many other packs which I've used. In practice, however, I usually carry a light load and often leave the hip belt unfastened.

              I do appreciate the straps on the hip belt which slide freely through the attachment to each piece of the buckle and run back to the friction lock on the pad. This V-shaped arrangement spreads the stress across the pad, so it hugs the top edge of the pelvis rather than pressing in the middle. It also means the straps are tightened by pulling in the opposite (and more comfortable) direction, as though one were pushing something forward and away from one's waist.

              The ventilated shoulder straps were mostly comfortable, though perhaps riding a little too wide on my shoulders (which was only a problem if the chest strap was open). The stub at the lower end of the shoulder pad (where the lower strap is attached) protruded enough to press on my side giving me some grief during extended hikes; I think that detail could be improved. *Note: The shoulder strap stub remains remain essentially unchanged on newer models.*

              Pockets & Straps
              --------------------------

              There is one zippered pocket inside the pack. It is quite small but well designed, accessible from both inside and outside, with mesh fabric on the inner surface for visibility of contents, and a key clip. The outer zipper is urethane-coated for water resistance.

              The hip belt has a zippered mesh pocket on each side. I found these to be quite useful for carrying energy bars and other small items for frequent access.

              There is a large outer back pocket made of elastic fabric. The design includes a folded lip which helps keep things from escaping. The lip is also attached to a compression strap which connects to the top of the pack, running over the zipper of the small inner pocket. This appears to be a possible nuisance but I like it, especially because the long compression strap provides a place to put a frequently used jacket or the like. *Note: Newer models have a much shorter strap which attaches below the zipper.* The stitching failed along the lip of the elastic pocket (not surprising considering that the thread was not elastic) but I it has endured since I repaired it with stronger thread and a more resilient stitch pattern.

              There are two outer, side pockets made of elastic fabric. These pockets worked well for me. Compression straps run across the openings, and I thought this might be a problem initially, but I came to appreciate the arrangement. *Note: The straps on newer models can be threaded over or under the pocket.*

              There is a deep and narrow inner pocket for a water bladder but I did not use it for water or for anything which I needed to access frequently. There are also two small straps to optionally hang a water bladder in the ventilated air space (created by the frame), which is easily accessible through a large, zippered opening. There is a small opening at the top of the pack for a water tube, and elastic loops along the shoulder straps for attaching the tube to either side.

              There are two removable straps at the bottom of the pack, apparently for a sleeping pad, but I found the location to be awkward and I preferred to use the top strap of the outer pocket.

              I never carried an ice axe but I occasionally made use of those attachments to fasten other things.

              Shape
              --------------------------

              I developed a great appreciation for the smooth, rounded profile which allowed me to duck under branches and drop over ledges and logs with greater ease than any other pack I've used. The pack also performed well at shedding branches and other potential snags as I burrowed through bush. These features are especially important to me as I often explore wilderness with dense vegetation. *Note: To date, all newer models of the Atmos 35 have a more conventional angular, protruding profile on the top.*

              It does protrude in the back but I only found that to be an occasional problem in urban environments. This humpiness is partly related to the frame which maintains a ventilation space behind the back. This space appears to be perhaps too large when looking at it but it is reduced when the pack is actually worn.

              Frame
              --------------------------

              The internal aluminum frame is strong enough for its intended purpose but it is vulnerable (don't sit on it!). My pack once became stuck in an airport x-ray machine and the conveyor belt compressed it with enough force to distort the aluminum frame.

              This prompted me to remove and disassemble the frame which consists of two bent aluminum tubes connected by two short titanium rods. I noticed that these rods were greased and that the grease had spread onto the fabric which is likely to cause long-term problems. I removed the grease and replaced its function by applying bushings of heat-shrink tubing (the kind used in electronics) to the ends of the rods (it fit perfectly).

              Finally, I bent the frame back into shape and subsequently decided to modify it to improve the geometry and increase the tension on the mesh back panel (which had over time become somewhat less than taut). During this process, I removed and replaced the frame several times. I am pleased that the frame is removable and I think it's an important point to note, as eventually it will very likely require adjustment. I have seen no mention of frame removal in Osprey's documentation but the procedure is evident. *Note: The frame on the 2009 Atmos is different and and apparently improved (though I expect it is similarly vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).*

              Air Travel
              --------------------------

              Air travellers should note that the medium size conforms almost exactly to the upper limit of common carry-on luggage dimensions: 56 x 36 x 23 cm (22 x 14 x 9 in.). The large size exceeds this, but not by much.


              Summary
              --------------------------

              I remain pleased with my Osprey Atmos pack and I recommend it. It's not ultralight but it is lightweight, ventilated and durable, ready to go cross country off the beaten trail, and carry on in the urban jungle. Osprey has revised the model at least twice, making some things better and others worse (as noted throughout the review).

              --- Good

              - excellent ventilation
              - smooth profile (not easily caught on things)
              - fits airline carry-on dimensions
              - panel loading
              {.compact}

              --- Bad

              - weight (it's lighter than most but it could be lighter still)
              - hip belt is somewhat restrictive
              - frame is vulnerable to being bent out of shape
              - shoulder straps could be more comfortable
              {.compact}

              ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: {style="margin: 0 3em"} :::
            • mistlail
              Hi Andy, Thanks for your feedback. ... Thanks for seeing relevance. I think it also has relevance as a comparison to the later models which are different, not
              Message 6 of 13 , Feb 1, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Andy,

                Thanks for your feedback.

                > Generally, ORs need to be on products less than 2 years old.
                > Just for future reference, make sure your future ORs are on current products.

                Thanks for seeing relevance. I think it also has relevance as a comparison to the later models which are different, not necessarily better. I also imagine there are many still using this pack and they may appreciate some of the information (for example, the section about frame adjustment and removal).

                In any case, if a product is useful and noteworthy, it follows that a review may also be useful. Even if a given product is no longer in production, it may serve to inform both consumers and manufacturers about salient features and potential pitfalls, which can be especially useful for improving our equipment.

                > list examples of elevations, terrain, and weather?

                I understand the desire for specificity but it seems superfluous to list myriad specific details/numbers, unless they are specifically relevant (and in this case I don't see much relevance; e.g., What difference does it make whether or not I used the pack at an elevation of 4.2 km?). In any case, I have added more information (throughout the review) about terrain and weather.

                Revised OR has been posted and html file uploaded.

                http://tinyurl.com/ydnax6s

                By the way, who should I contact about improving the BGT website?

                Thanks again,
                Leif
              • a_henrichs
                Hi Lief, Your link did not work. Please post a working link to the html version. Thanks, Andy
                Message 7 of 13 , Feb 4, 2010
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                  Hi Lief,

                  Your link did not work. Please post a working link to the html version.

                  Thanks,

                  Andy

                  --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, mistlail <mistlail@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
                  > ===========================
                  > Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006)
                  > ===========================
                  >
                  > An innovative 35 L backpack with excellent ventilation.
                  >
                  > **18 Dec 2009**
                  >
                  >
                  > Reviewer
                  > ====================
                  >
                  > Name: Leif LeBaron
                  > Age: 37
                  > Gender: Male
                  > Height: 183 cm (6')
                  > Weight: 70 kg (155 lb)
                  > E-mail: (to be included in HTML version)
                  > Home: West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
                  > {.compact}
                  >
                  > Backpacking Background: I began backpacking in my teenage years, and hiking, years before that. I backpack while travelling in both urban and wilderness environments. My travels have taken me through a wide range of landscapes, both in North America and overseas. I generally feel at home in the wilderness and I enjoy extreme terrain and weather but I'm not an ice climber nor a peak bagger. In 1999, I became interested in reducing my load and I now go more or less ultralight. I sleep in a hammock.
                  >
                  >
                  > Product
                  > ====================
                  >
                  > ![](osprey-atmos-35.jpg)
                  > [Photo: Osprey Packs]{style="margin-right:4em"}
                  > {style="float:right;text-align:right;margin:0 -4em 3em 1.5em"}
                  >
                  > Manufacturer: Osprey Packs
                  > Year of Manufacture: 2006
                  > Manufacturer's Website: www.ospreypacks.com
                  > Listed Weight: 1.16 kg (2 lb 9 oz)
                  > Measured Weight: 1.2 kg (2 lb 10 oz)
                  > Size: medium
                  > Capacity: 35 L (2100 cu in)
                  > Type: panel loading
                  > {.compact}
                  >
                  > Review
                  > ====================
                  >
                  > I used this pack during three separate trips (approximately four months total duration) on the Hawaiian islands, and during numerous shorter trips in British Columbia throughout the seasons. This has been my primary pack for the past three years, used in varied conditions throughout a wide range of terrain, elevation and weather.
                  >
                  > I purchased an Osprey Atmos pack primarily because of the ventilated suspension. An open mesh is stretched over a lightweight aluminum frame. The shoulder straps and hip belt pads are textured and perforated. I do not recommend the pack for use with snow because it may collect in the air space beneath the mesh back panel. In cold conditions (regardless of snow) ventilation seems unnecessary and I would prefer to remove the space, bringing the load closer to the body. Occasionally, I had to remove twigs and other small debris from the space but that was easy and infrequent.
                  >
                  > The construction is excellent. Stitching is strong and binding tape covers all seams. The fabric is light but it has endured significant stress without fail. There are two layers of fabric on the bottom panel of the pack. The fabric is waterproof (coated inside with urethane) but I would expect some leakage even in light rain. I kept mine dry under a poncho; however, on several occasions the pack was splashed by rogue waves and endured mist and light drizzle without significant leakage.
                  >
                  >
                  > Panel Loading
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > My Atmos is a panel loader. The main compartment has two large zippers which caused me no trouble and I found the contents to be very accessible. This was especially useful when conditions prevented the unloading of pack contents (i.e., for lack of a clean and dry place to put them); something which is very difficult if not impossible with a top-loading pack.
                  >
                  > The zippers run down each side, not all the way to the bottom but low enough that contents can be accessed without unpacking. *Note: Newer models have shorter zippers, effectively making the pack panel-loading at the top and top-loading at the bottom.*
                  >
                  > Fit
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > Having grown accustomed to the excellent range of motion in the "floating" hip belts of Arc'teryx packs, I found the Atmos hip belt to be somewhat restrictive but also more comfortable and ergonomic than many other packs which I've used. In practice, however, I usually carry a light load and often leave the hip belt unfastened.
                  >
                  > I do appreciate the straps on the hip belt which slide freely through the attachment to each piece of the buckle and run back to the friction lock on the pad. This V-shaped arrangement spreads the stress across the pad, so it hugs the top edge of the pelvis rather than pressing in the middle. It also means the straps are tightened by pulling in the opposite (and more comfortable) direction, as though one were pushing something forward and away from one's waist.
                  >
                  > The ventilated shoulder straps were mostly comfortable, though perhaps riding a little too wide on my shoulders (which was only a problem if the chest strap was open). The stub at the lower end of the shoulder pad (where the lower strap is attached) protruded enough to press on my side giving me some grief during extended hikes; I think that detail could be improved. *Note: The shoulder strap stub remains remain essentially unchanged on newer models.*
                  >
                  > Pockets & Straps
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > There is one zippered pocket inside the pack. It is quite small but well designed, accessible from both inside and outside, with mesh fabric on the inner surface for visibility of contents, and a key clip. The outer zipper is urethane-coated for water resistance.
                  >
                  > The hip belt has a zippered mesh pocket on each side. I found these to be quite useful for carrying energy bars and other small items for frequent access.
                  >
                  > There is a large outer back pocket made of elastic fabric. The design includes a folded lip which helps keep things from escaping. The lip is also attached to a compression strap which connects to the top of the pack, running over the zipper of the small inner pocket. This appears to be a possible nuisance but I like it, especially because the long compression strap provides a place to put a frequently used jacket or the like. *Note: Newer models have a much shorter strap which attaches below the zipper.* The stitching failed along the lip of the elastic pocket (not surprising considering that the thread was not elastic) but I it has endured since I repaired it with stronger thread and a more resilient stitch pattern.
                  >
                  > There are two outer, side pockets made of elastic fabric. These pockets worked well for me. Compression straps run across the openings, and I thought this might be a problem initially, but I came to appreciate the arrangement. *Note: The straps on newer models can be threaded over or under the pocket.*
                  >
                  > There is a deep and narrow inner pocket for a water bladder but I did not use it for water or for anything which I needed to access frequently. There are also two small straps to optionally hang a water bladder in the ventilated air space (created by the frame), which is easily accessible through a large, zippered opening. There is a small opening at the top of the pack for a water tube, and elastic loops along the shoulder straps for attaching the tube to either side.
                  >
                  > There are two removable straps at the bottom of the pack, apparently for a sleeping pad, but I found the location to be awkward and I preferred to use the top strap of the outer pocket.
                  >
                  > I never carried an ice axe but I occasionally made use of those attachments to fasten other things.
                  >
                  > Shape
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > I developed a great appreciation for the smooth, rounded profile which allowed me to duck under branches and drop over ledges and logs with greater ease than any other pack I've used. The pack also performed well at shedding branches and other potential snags as I burrowed through bush. These features are especially important to me as I often explore wilderness with dense vegetation. *Note: To date, all newer models of the Atmos 35 have a more conventional angular, protruding profile on the top.*
                  >
                  > It does protrude in the back but I only found that to be an occasional problem in urban environments. This humpiness is partly related to the frame which maintains a ventilation space behind the back. This space appears to be perhaps too large when looking at it but it is reduced when the pack is actually worn.
                  >
                  > Frame
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > The internal aluminum frame is strong enough for its intended purpose but it is vulnerable (don't sit on it!). My pack once became stuck in an airport x-ray machine and the conveyor belt compressed it with enough force to distort the aluminum frame.
                  >
                  > This prompted me to remove and disassemble the frame which consists of two bent aluminum tubes connected by two short titanium rods. I noticed that these rods were greased and that the grease had spread onto the fabric which is likely to cause long-term problems. I removed the grease and replaced its function by applying bushings of heat-shrink tubing (the kind used in electronics) to the ends of the rods (it fit perfectly).
                  >
                  > Finally, I bent the frame back into shape and subsequently decided to modify it to improve the geometry and increase the tension on the mesh back panel (which had over time become somewhat less than taut). During this process, I removed and replaced the frame several times. I am pleased that the frame is removable and I think it's an important point to note, as eventually it will very likely require adjustment. I have seen no mention of frame removal in Osprey's documentation but the procedure is evident. *Note: The frame on the 2009 Atmos is different and and apparently improved (though I expect it is similarly vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).*
                  >
                  > Air Travel
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > Air travellers should note that the medium size conforms almost exactly to the upper limit of common carry-on luggage dimensions: 56 x 36 x 23 cm (22 x 14 x 9 in.). The large size exceeds this, but not by much.
                  >
                  >
                  > Summary
                  > --------------------------
                  >
                  > I remain pleased with my Osprey Atmos pack and I recommend it. It's not ultralight but it is lightweight, ventilated and durable, ready to go cross country off the beaten trail, and carry on in the urban jungle. Osprey has revised the model at least twice, making some things better and others worse (as noted throughout the review).
                  >
                  > --- Good
                  >
                  > - excellent ventilation
                  > - smooth profile (not easily caught on things)
                  > - fits airline carry-on dimensions
                  > - panel loading
                  > {.compact}
                  >
                  > --- Bad
                  >
                  > - weight (it's lighter than most but it could be lighter still)
                  > - hip belt is somewhat restrictive
                  > - frame is vulnerable to being bent out of shape
                  > - shoulder straps could be more comfortable
                  > {.compact}
                  >
                  > ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: {style="margin: 0 3em"} :::
                  >
                • mistlail
                  ... Sorry, I changed the title and forgot to update the link. http://tinyurl.com/yjlw22s
                  Message 8 of 13 , Feb 4, 2010
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                    > Your link did not work. Please post a working link to the html version.

                    Sorry, I changed the title and forgot to update the link.

                    http://tinyurl.com/yjlw22s
                  • a_henrichs
                    Hi Lief, I have some more edits for you. Nothing too significant, just some minor ones. When they are corrected, please repost your new version with a new
                    Message 9 of 13 , Feb 6, 2010
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                      Hi Lief,

                      I have some more edits for you. Nothing too significant, just some minor ones. When they are corrected, please repost your new version with a new html link. Please include the link in the same post as the text version.

                      Thanks,

                      Andy

                      EDIT: It would be helpful to include your torso length. Along the same lines, please include sizes available and their corresponding torso lengths (as stated by Osprey).

                      > **18 Dec 2009**
                      EDIT: update the date

                      The fabric is waterproof...
                      Edit: Are you talking about the doubled fabric or the fabric of the entire pack?

                      > Having grown accustomed to the excellent range of motion in the "floating" hip belts of Arc'teryx packs
                      Comment: Direct comparisons to other manufacturers are discouraged. If someone hasn't used an Arc'teryx pack, this hipbelt comparison doesn't help much. Switching "Arc'Teryx" to a more generic term may be best.

                      >I found the Atmos hip belt to be somewhat restrictive but also more comfortable and ergonomic than many other packs which I've used.
                      Edit: Can you expand on this?

                      > but I it has endured since I repaired it with stronger thread and a more resilient stitch pattern.
                      EDIT: remove the first "I"

                      > I noticed that these rods were greased and that the grease had spread onto the fabric which is likely to cause long-term problems.
                      EDIT: Avoid making any suppositions as to potential problems. Just review based on your experiences, not what you think may happen.

                      > (though I expect it is similarly vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).
                      EDIT: Just like the above edit, don't base review information on suppositions.
                    • mistlail
                      Hi Andy, Thanks for your edits. Leif http://tinyurl.com/yjlw22s ... =========================== Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006) =========================== An
                      Message 10 of 13 , Feb 7, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi Andy,

                        Thanks for your edits.

                        Leif

                        http://tinyurl.com/yjlw22s

                        ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
                        ===========================
                        Osprey Atmos 35 (Fall 2006)
                        ===========================

                        An innovative 35 L backpack with excellent ventilation.

                        **7 Feb 2010**


                        Reviewer
                        ====================

                        ---------+ +---------------------------
                        Name: Leif LeBaron
                        Age: 37
                        Gender: Male
                        Height: 183 cm (6')
                        Weight: 70 kg (155 lb)
                        Home: West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
                        {cellpadding="3%"}

                        I began backpacking in my teenage years, and hiking, years before that. I backpack while travelling in both urban and wilderness environments. My travels have taken me through a wide range of landscapes, both in North America and overseas. I generally feel at home in the wilderness and I enjoy extreme terrain and weather but I'm not an ice climber nor a peak bagger. In 1999, I became interested in reducing my load and I now go more or less ultralight. I sleep in a hammock.

                        Product
                        ====================

                        ![](osprey-atmos-35.jpg)
                        [Photo: Osprey Packs]{style="margin-right:4em"}
                        {style="float:right;text-align:right;margin:0 -4em 3em 1.5em"}

                        ----------------+ +--------------------
                        Manufacturer: Osprey Packs
                        Year of Manufacture: 2006
                        Manufacturer's Website: www.ospreypacks.com
                        Listed Weight: 1.16 kg (2 lb 9 oz)
                        Measured Weight: 1.2 kg (2 lb 10 oz)
                        Size: medium
                        Capacity: 35 L (2100 cu in)
                        Type: panel loading
                        {cellpadding="3%"}

                        Review
                        ====================

                        I used this pack during three separate trips (approximately four months total duration) on the Hawaiian islands, and during numerous shorter trips in British Columbia throughout the seasons. This has been my primary pack for the past three years, used in varied conditions throughout a wide range of terrain, elevation and weather.

                        I purchased an Osprey Atmos pack primarily because of the ventilated suspension. An open mesh is stretched over a lightweight aluminum frame. The shoulder straps and hip belt pads are textured and perforated. I do not recommend the pack for use with snow because it may collect in the air space beneath the mesh back panel. In cold conditions (regardless of snow) ventilation seems unnecessary and I would prefer to remove the space, bringing the load closer to the body. Occasionally, I had to remove twigs and other small debris from the space but that was easy and infrequent.

                        The construction is excellent. Stitching is strong and binding tape covers all seams. The fabric is light but it has endured significant stress without fail; the bottom panel of the pack has two layers. The fabric is also waterproof (the inner surface coated with urethane) but the seams are not sealed. I kept mine dry under a poncho; however, on several occasions the pack was splashed by rogue waves and endured mist and sporadic drizzle without significant leakage.


                        Panel Loading
                        --------------------------

                        My Atmos is a panel loader. The main compartment has two large zippers which caused me no trouble and I found the contents to be very accessible. This was especially useful when conditions prevented the unloading of pack contents (i.e., for lack of a clean and dry place to put them); something which is difficult if not impossible with a top-loading pack.

                        The zippers run down each side, not all the way to the bottom but low enough that contents can be accessed without unpacking. *Note: Newer models have shorter zippers, effectively making the pack panel-loading at the top and top-loading at the bottom.*

                        Fit
                        --------------------------

                        Following Osprey's instructions, my torso length is 50 cm. I tried the large (51--57 cm) but I chose the medium (46--52 cm) even though it feels a bit short. I prefer it because it's smaller and the bottom rides high enough (with the shoulder straps sufficiently tightened) that I can run and enjoy greater freedom of movement without irritating my gluteal muscles.

                        Having grown accustomed to the excellent range of motion in a "floating" hip belt (which enables the pelvis to tilt and pitch freely), I found the Atmos hip belt to be relatively restrictive (mostly around the coronal axis) but also more comfortable and ergonomic than many other packs which I've used. In practice, however, I usually carry a light load and often leave the hip belt unfastened.

                        I appreciate the straps on the hip belt which slide freely through the attachment to each piece of the buckle and run back to the friction lock on the pad. This V-shaped arrangement spreads the force across the pad, so it cups the iliac crest of the pelvis rather than concentrating the force in a narrower band. It also means the straps are tightened by pulling in the opposite (and more comfortable) direction, as though one were pushing something forward and away from one's waist.

                        The ventilated shoulder straps were mostly comfortable, though perhaps riding a little too wide on my shoulders (which was only a problem if the chest strap was open). The stub at the lower end of the shoulder pad (where the lower strap is attached) protruded enough to press on my side causing some irritation during extended hikes; I think that detail could be improved. *Note: The shoulder strap stub remains essentially unchanged on newer models.*

                        I'm pleased that the pack is narrower than my own torso, making passage through narrow openings easier, and also enabling my arms to swing naturally without interference.

                        Pockets & Straps
                        --------------------------

                        There is one zippered pocket inside the pack. It is quite small but well designed, accessible from both inside and outside, with mesh fabric on the inner surface for visibility of contents, and a key clip. The outer zipper is urethane-coated for water resistance.

                        The hip belt has a zippered mesh pocket on each side. I found these to be quite useful for carrying energy bars and other small items for frequent access.

                        There is a large outer back pocket made of elastic fabric. The design includes a folded lip which helps keep things from escaping. The lip is also attached to a compression strap which connects to the top of the pack, running over the zipper of the small inner pocket. This appears to be a possible nuisance but I like it, especially because the long compression strap provides a place to put a frequently used jacket or the like. *Note: Newer models have a much shorter strap which attaches below the zipper.* The stitching failed along the lip of the elastic pocket (not surprising considering that the thread was not elastic) but it has endured since I repaired it with stronger thread and a more resilient stitch pattern.

                        There are two outer, side pockets made of elastic fabric. These pockets worked well for me. Compression straps run across the openings, and I thought this might be a problem initially, but I came to appreciate the arrangement. *Note: The straps on newer models can be threaded over or under the pocket.*

                        There is a deep and narrow inner pocket for a water bladder but I did not use it for water or for anything which I needed to access frequently. There are also two small straps to optionally hang a water bladder in the ventilated air space (created by the frame), which is easily accessible through a large, zippered opening. There is a small opening at the top of the pack for a water tube, and elastic loops along the shoulder straps for attaching the tube to either side.

                        There are two removable straps at the bottom of the pack, apparently for a sleeping pad, but I found the location to be awkward and I preferred to use the top strap of the outer pocket.

                        I never carried an ice axe but I occasionally made use of those attachments to fasten other things.

                        Shape
                        --------------------------

                        I developed a great appreciation for the pack's smooth, rounded profile which allowed me to duck under branches and drop over ledges and logs with greater ease than any other pack I've used. The pack also performed well at shedding branches and other potential snags as I burrowed through bush. These features are especially important to me as I often explore wilderness with dense vegetation. *Note: To date, all newer models of the Atmos 35 have a more conventional angular, protruding profile on the top.*

                        It does bulge in the back but I only found that to be an occasional problem in urban environments. This humpiness is partly related to the frame which maintains a ventilation space behind the back. This space appears to be perhaps too large when looking at it but it is reduced when the pack is actually worn.

                        Frame
                        --------------------------

                        The internal aluminum frame is strong enough for its intended purpose but it is vulnerable (don't sit on it!). My pack once became stuck in an airport x-ray machine and the conveyor belt compressed it with enough force to distort the aluminum frame.

                        This prompted me to remove and disassemble the frame which consists of two bent aluminum tubes connected by two short titanium rods. I noticed that these rods were greased and that the grease had spread onto the fabric which prompted me to preempt potential problems. I removed the grease and replaced its function by applying bushings of heat-shrink tubing (the kind used in electronics) to the ends of the rods; it fit perfectly.

                        Finally, I bent the frame back into shape and subsequently decided to modify the shape to improve the geometry and increase the tension on the mesh back panel (which had over time become somewhat less than taut). During this process, I removed and replaced the frame several times. I am pleased that the frame is removable and I think it's an important point to note. I have seen no mention of frame removal in Osprey's documentation but the procedure is evident. *Note: The frame on the 2009 Atmos is different and somewhat improved (though it is similarly vulnerable and I don't know how easy it is to remove).*

                        Air Travel
                        --------------------------

                        Air travellers should note that the medium size conforms almost exactly to the limit for common carry-on luggage dimensions: 56 x 36 x 23 cm (22 x 14 x 9 in.). The large size exceeds this, but not by much.


                        Summary
                        --------------------------

                        I remain pleased with my Osprey Atmos pack and I recommend it. It's not ultralight but it is lightweight, ventilated and durable, ready to go cross country off the beaten trail, and carry on in the urban jungle. Osprey has revised the model at least twice, making some things better and others worse (as noted throughout the review).

                        --- Good

                        - excellent ventilation
                        - smooth profile (not easily caught on things)
                        - fits airline carry-on dimensions
                        - panel loading
                        {.compact}

                        --- Bad

                        - weight (it's lighter than most but it could be lighter still)
                        - hip belt is somewhat restrictive
                        - shoulder straps could be more comfortable
                        - frame is vulnerable to being bent out of shape
                        {.compact}

                        ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: {style="margin: 0 3em"} :::
                      • a_henrichs
                        Hi Leif, Nice report! I am happy to inform you that everything looks good and you have been approved to upload the file. Once you log in to the BGT website,
                        Message 11 of 13 , Feb 13, 2010
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                          Hi Leif,

                          Nice report! I am happy to inform you that everything looks good and you have been approved to upload the file. Once you log in to the BGT website, upload it at http://tinyurl.com/yaqhohq. Please be sure to delete your test html file. Finally, get started on your 2nd OR so you can begin testing!

                          Thanks,

                          Andy
                        • mistlail
                          Hi Andy, File is uploaded but I notice it has a separate category Osprey Atmos - Fall 2006 Model and I think it should be merged with the existing Osprey
                          Message 12 of 13 , Feb 13, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Hi Andy,

                            File is uploaded but I notice it has a separate category "Osprey Atmos - Fall 2006 Model" and I think it should be merged with the existing "Osprey Atmos 35" category. In any case, it seems ambiguous to omit "35" from the category name.

                            http://www.BackpackGearTest.org/mfr_reviews/Osprey

                            Leif
                          • mistlail
                            And I noticed yet another category Osprey Packs Atmos 35 with three reviews. I d suggest substituting Osprey for Osprey Packs in all categories. Leif
                            Message 13 of 13 , Feb 13, 2010
                            • 0 Attachment
                              And I noticed yet another category "Osprey Packs Atmos 35" with three reviews.

                              I'd suggest substituting "Osprey" for "Osprey Packs" in all categories.

                              Leif
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