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Re: [BackpackGearTest] Re: OWNER REVIEW - Snow Peak GST-100A stove

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  • theMiddleSister@usaring.com
    Chris, Your OR will be on the next update of the Owner Review. It won t be looked at until it is posted to that update. So, you ll be waiting for a few more
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 1, 2009
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      Chris,

      Your OR will be on the next update of the Owner Review. It won't be looked
      at until it is posted to that update. So, you'll be waiting for a few more
      days, I'm afraid. Hang on!

      Kathy
      One of the OR Editors and now officially OOP!

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "cwiseman73" <cwise73@...>
      To: <BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, July 01, 2009 1:45 PM
      Subject: [BackpackGearTest] Re: OWNER REVIEW - Snow Peak GST-100A stove


      > Being that it is approaching the 4th of July weekend, I hope everyone is
      > already in the woods or planning their escape, but if anyone has a chance
      > to look over my review in the next couple of days, I would greatly
      > appreciate it. Thanks so much!
      > -Chris
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > To read our reviews, please visit http://www.backpackgeartest.org/Yahoo!
      > Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > __________ NOD32 4205 (20090701) Information __________
      >
      > This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
      > http://www.eset.com
      >
      >
    • cwiseman73
      Sounds good. Thanks Kathy!
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Sounds good. Thanks Kathy!
      • Jamie D.
        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 2, 2009
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          PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

          Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community! The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints, to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely manner. Do not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben(at)hotmail.com

          To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
          yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.

          Once your first two Owner Reviews have been approved and you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to Jenn K., the mentor coordinator, at mentor (at) backpackgeartest.org.

          You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group. These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
          will usually result in a better review, as well as making things easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject line of your re-submitted review if you take this route or make any
          changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit Moderator.

          Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups list to keep track of the progress of your Owner Review. Once an Editor has taken your OR and made the necessary edits they will post their comments to the list with EDIT in the subject line. Once you have incorporated these edits into your review please use REPOST in the subject line. When your OR has been approved by the Editor they will use APPROVED in the subject line.

          If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR while it's in the edit queue, the entire Owner Review Queue is posted to this yahoo group list on either Thursdays or Fridays.

          If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask via the list or contact me directly.

          Regards
          Jamie DeBenedetto
          Edit Administration Manager
        • a_henrichs
          Hi Chris, Welcome to BGT and thanks for joining! Overall your review looks good, but there are a few edits and additions needed. Basically, we use three tiers
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 7, 2009
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            Hi Chris,

            Welcome to BGT and thanks for joining! Overall your review looks good, but there are a few edits and additions needed. Basically, we use three tiers of edits. EDITS need to be changed, Edits are suggested changes but are up to you, and Comments are just that.

            The edit process can seem daunting at times but don't despair. There is a learning curve and you seem to be off to a good start. If you feel like you need more guidance, be sure to ask about a mentor on the list.

            Are you able to include a picture of the stove in your review? While we may let you upload this report without one, all future reports need at least one photo. Additional photo info can be found in the BGT survival guide.

            Once you have made these edits, go ahead and repost the review. When you do this, please upload your html version to the "Owner Review" folder under the "test" folder on BackpackGearTest.org. This folder is visible after you log in. Please include a tinyurl link to this test html folder in your repost. Thanks and I look forward to working with you!

            Andy

            > Owner Review of Snow Peak GST-100A stove
            EDIT: It would be better if you referred to the stove as the Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-100A. It looks like all of the Giga models are almost identical with different materials.

            > Height: 6' 2"
            > Weight: 185
            EDIT: These need metric conversions as well as standard BGT unit abbreviations. The BGT Conversion page (http://www.backpackgeartest.org/convert.html) has a lot of useful info about conversions.

            > Backpacking Background: I hike to get away from the stress of living and working in NYC. Most of my hikes are day trips using public transportation (subway, bus and train), but I do manage to work in as many multi-day outings as I can.
            EDIT: Can you expand on this? Pack weight, lightweight vs. kitchen sink, terrain, etc.

            >Product information
            EDIT: Does the manufacturer's website have a MSRP (retail price)? If so, be sure to include it here as you mention the high price at the end of the report.

            > Weight as delivered 86.0 grams (108.8 grams with travel case)
            EDIT: conversion needed

            > multiple languages and a hard plastic case.
            EDIT: do you have dimensions for the case?

            > It has four titanium arms that fold out to support cookware.
            EDIT: How large a platform does it create? Also, does the manufacturer state that the arms specifically are titanium?

            > GST-100A seemed like it hit the mark in both of these categories.
            EDIT: From here on out, you can make it easy on yourself (and the reader and call it a Giga Stove. Also, you should probably add "The" to the beginning of this paragraph.

            >I was able to find it for sale in a package that included the Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and the Snow Peak titanium spork, which looked like it would be a great way to get up and running with with very light cooking kit for solo camping.
            Edit: This info isn't totally necessary, but it would be fine to leave it in.

            > Shortly after receiving the stove I went on a camping trip in Northern
            > California. I spent three days in Salt Point State Park, and then spent
            > three days in Yosemite. The stove was in daily use for breakfast, lunch and
            > dinner. I found that because of the size and the weight, I did not hesitate
            > to throw it in my day pack so that I could have hot meals on my day hikes.
            > Setting up and operating the stove was fast and clean, and water could be
            > boiled very quickly.
            EDIT: More info would be useful here. You have a good start, but the more info you can give our readers the better. What type of foods did you cook? Were the "boil and sit" type meals or did they require some simmering? Was it easy to maintain a simmer on the stove? About how long did it take to boil water? How much fuel did the stove use over a 3-day trip? How did you store the stove in your pack? Did you use the hard plastic case? Were you concerned about it getting damaged in your pack or did it prove to be durable? Are there any small pieces that look like they may be more prone to damage? Are there any maintenance instructions included with the stove?

            > Pros
            > 1. Light weight.
            EDIT: You can remove the . after weight to maintain consistency with the rest of the pros and cons items.
          • cwiseman73
            Thanks for the edits Andy and sorry for the delay in getting them done. Here is my revised review. Please let me know of any other edits or suggestions.
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 30, 2009
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              Thanks for the edits Andy and sorry for the delay in getting them done. Here is my revised review. Please let me know of any other edits or suggestions. Thanks!
              -Chris

              Owner Review of Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-100A

              Name: Chris Wiseman
              Age: 36
              Gender: Male
              Height: 6' 2" (1.88 meters)
              Weight: 185 (83.92 kg)
              Email address: cwise73 AT gmail DOT com
              City, State, Country: Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
              Date: June 26, 2009

              Backpacking Background: I hike to get away from the stress of living and working in NYC. Most of my hikes are day trips using public transportation (subway, bus and train), but I do manage to work in as many multi-day outings as I can. I prefer to pack fairly light and look for difficult terrain or high milage hikes.

              Product information
              Manufacturer Snow Peak
              URL www.snowpeak.com
              MSRP $74.95 USD
              Listed weight 3.0oz / 87 grams
              Weight as delivered 3.03oz/86.0 grams (3.84oz/108.8 grams with travel case)

              <Image of the stove and the items that came with it>

              Product description
              This is a small and light weight stove with a built in auto ignition system. It uses screw on type butane/propane cartridges.
              The stove arrives in a tiny but nice box and includes instructions in multiple languages and a hard plastic case. The plastic case measures 3.5 x 1.5 x 2 inches (89 x 38 x 51 mm).
              The stove is very minimal in design and operation. It has four arms that fold out to support cookware. Unfolded the arms create a platform that measures 4.25 inches diagonally (108 mm diagonally). The flame is controlled with an adjustable valve that has an easily foldable spring loaded handle. The unit is lit using the built in auto igniter that is activated with the push of a small grey button.


              On the Bench
              Before using it in the field, I decided to test it out in the comforts of home. The stove screwed on very easily to the top of the fuel canister, and minimal force was needed to form a gas tight seal. The gas valve was easy to operate (very light force was needed to open and close the valve), and provided a wide range of flame output. The fuel valve handle was easy to grip and stayed cool during operation. The support arms folded out to create a large support area and seemed to provide a decent grip on my cooking pot. The auto ignite system ignited the stove on the first try ten times out of ten.

              To get an idea of power output and fuel consumption of the Giga Stove, I decided to run a couple of test. I put one cup (8 fluid ounces) into a Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and timed the duration it took to bring the water to a very fast boil. A butane/propane/isobutane canister was used to fuel the stove. The canister was weighed before and after every test to determine the weight of the fuel used to bring the water to a boil.

              <Image of the flame output for test 1>

              Test one was with the valve of the stove opened up to the point where the visible flame could be seen to extend to the edge and slightly past the sides of the pot. This is normally a larger flame than I would use in the field. It took 2 minutes and 48 seconds to come to boil using 4.2 grams (.15 oz) of fuel.

              <Image of the flame output for test 2>

              In test two, I used a smaller flame that extended halfway from the center to the edge of the pot (about 1 inch / 25.4 mm from the edge). This flame output is very similar to what I use when I am using the stove in the field. The water was brought to a rapid boil in 3 minutes and 48 seconds and used 3.6 grams (.13 oz) of fuel.

              <Image of the flame output for test 3>

              The third test was a repeat of the second. I tried to maintain a similar flame size to what I use in the field. The boil time was 3 minutes and 56 seconds and the amount of fuel was 3.5 grams (.12 oz).


              Field information

              <Image of stove in use in the field>

              I had two basic criteria that needed to be met when I decided to buy a new stove. The first was light weight but durable, and the second was ease of use. The Giga Stove seemed like it hit the mark in both of these categories. I was able to find it for sale in a package that included the Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and the Snow Peak titanium spork, which looked like it would be a great way to get up and running with with very light cooking kit for solo camping.

              Shortly after receiving the stove I went on a camping trip in Northern California. I spent three days in Salt Point State Park, and then spent three days in Yosemite. While in the pack, the Giga Stove would live in the supplied plastic case which provided plenty of protection. The stove was in daily use for breakfast, lunch and dinner. On this trip I used a combination of dehydrated (just add water) and foods that needed a simmer.

              For the dehydrated foods (morning coffee, dehydrated bacon and eggs, dehydrated sweet and sour chicken, etc...) the stove was a joy to use. It was very easy to light and brought the water to a boil quickly. It was very stable and I never had an issue with the arms of the stove gripping the pot. It also seemed to cool very quickly which made a big difference when I wanted to minimize the duration of my lunch breaks.

              For the meals that required the water to be simmered (noodles), the stove worked well. During simmering, the fuel valve was slightly difficult to fine tune. It seemed like the spring on the lever for the fuel valve would slightly compress when the fine adjustments were made. Although it was a little annoying, it did not make a major impact in the positive impression I have of this stove.

              The one negative that I encountered was that without any type of wind screen, the stove was a little difficult to use in high wind situations. Even when the stove was set to simmer, the flame was never blown out, but in windy situations, my pot would have to be repositioned so that the wind swept flame would be focused on the center of the pot. Moving the pot in this way seemed to cause a bit of instability and a higher risk of having the stove tip over. This situation was easily overcome by scouting a cooking site that provided shelter from the wind. If I were hiking in a location that was windy and did not have shelter, i would definitely invest in a wind screen.


              Summary
              The Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-110A is a great light weight and easy to use backpacking stove. The size of the folded stove made it hard not to bring it along, and ease of use made it a joy to cook with.


              Pros
              1 Light weight.
              2 Very small
              3 Easy to light and use
              4 Built to last

              Cons
              1 No supplied wind screen
              2 Expensive
            • a_henrichs
              Chris, This is a very good review. It is much more thorough than your initial review and includes a lot of useful information. You re getting very close to
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 4, 2009
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                Chris,

                This is a very good review. It is much more thorough than your initial review and includes a lot of useful information. You're getting very close to getting approved! I have three minor edits below. Also, you need to upload a html version of this review on the backpackgeartest.org site. When you do this, please upload your html version to the "Owner Review" folder under the "test" folder on BackpackGearTest.org. This folder is visible after you log in. Please include a tinyurl link to this test html folder in your repost.

                In your next repost, make sure you put "REPOST" in the subject line so it's nice and easy to find. Thanks!

                Andy


                > I prefer to pack fairly light and look for difficult terrain or high milage hikes.
                EDIT: mileage

                > The Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-110A is a great light weight...
                EDIT: I think this should be GST-100A

                > 1 Light weight.
                EDIT: remove the . for consistency
              • cwiseman73
                Thanks again Andy. I have made the edits and created an html file and posted to this url: http://tiny.cc/sKxlh . Let me know if there is anything else that I
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 6, 2009
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                  Thanks again Andy. I have made the edits and created an html file and posted to this url: http://tiny.cc/sKxlh . Let me know if there is anything else that I need to do. Thanks so much!


                  Owner Review of Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-100A

                  Name: Chris Wiseman
                  Age: 36
                  Gender: Male
                  Height: 6' 2" (1.88 meters)
                  Weight: 185 (83.92 kg)
                  Email address: cwise73 AT gmail DOT com
                  City, State, Country: Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
                  Date: June 26, 2009

                  Backpacking Background: I hike to get away from the stress of living and working in NYC. Most of my hikes are day trips using public transportation (subway, bus and train), but I do manage to work in as many multi-day outings as I can. I prefer to pack fairly light and look for difficult terrain or high mileage hikes.

                  Product information
                  Manufacturer Snow Peak
                  URL www.snowpeak.com
                  MSRP $74.95 USD
                  Listed weight 3.0oz / 87 grams
                  Weight as delivered 3.03oz/86.0 grams (3.84oz/108.8 grams with travel case)

                  <Image of the stove and the items that came with it>

                  Product description
                  This is a small and light weight stove with a built in auto ignition system. It uses screw on type butane/propane cartridges.
                  The stove arrives in a tiny but nice box and includes instructions in multiple languages and a hard plastic case. The plastic case measures 3.5 x 1.5 x 2 inches (89 x 38 x 51 mm).
                  The stove is very minimal in design and operation. It has four arms that fold out to support cookware. Unfolded the arms create a platform that measures 4.25 inches diagonally (108 mm diagonally). The flame is controlled with an adjustable valve that has an easily foldable spring loaded handle. The unit is lit using the built in auto igniter that is activated with the push of a small grey button.


                  On the Bench
                  Before using it in the field, I decided to test it out in the comforts of home. The stove screwed on very easily to the top of the fuel canister, and minimal force was needed to form a gas tight seal. The gas valve was easy to operate (very light force was needed to open and close the valve), and provided a wide range of flame output. The fuel valve handle was easy to grip and stayed cool during operation. The support arms folded out to create a large support area and seemed to provide a decent grip on my cooking pot. The auto ignite system ignited the stove on the first try ten times out of ten.

                  To get an idea of power output and fuel consumption of the Giga Stove, I decided to run a couple of test. I put one cup (8 fluid ounces) into a Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and timed the duration it took to bring the water to a very fast boil. A butane/propane/isobutane canister was used to fuel the stove. The canister was weighed before and after every test to determine the weight of the fuel used to bring the water to a boil.

                  <Image of the flame output for test 1>

                  Test one was with the valve of the stove opened up to the point where the visible flame could be seen to extend to the edge and slightly past the sides of the pot. This is normally a larger flame than I would use in the field. It took 2 minutes and 48 seconds to come to boil using 4.2 grams (.15 oz) of fuel.

                  <Image of the flame output for test 2>

                  In test two, I used a smaller flame that extended halfway from the center to the edge of the pot (about 1 inch / 25.4 mm from the edge). This flame output is very similar to what I use when I am using the stove in the field. The water was brought to a rapid boil in 3 minutes and 48 seconds and used 3.6 grams (.13 oz) of fuel.

                  <Image of the flame output for test 3>

                  The third test was a repeat of the second. I tried to maintain a similar flame size to what I use in the field. The boil time was 3 minutes and 56 seconds and the amount of fuel was 3.5 grams (.12 oz).


                  Field information


                  I had two basic criteria that needed to be met when I decided to buy a new stove. The first was light weight but durable, and the second was ease of use. The Giga Stove seemed like it hit the mark in both of these categories. I was able to find it for sale in a package that included the Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and the Snow Peak titanium spork, which looked like it would be a great way to get up and running with with very light cooking kit for solo camping.

                  Shortly after receiving the stove I went on a camping trip in Northern California. I spent three days in Salt Point State Park, and then spent three days in Yosemite. While in the pack, the Giga Stove would live in the supplied plastic case which provided plenty of protection. The stove was in daily use for breakfast, lunch and dinner. On this trip I used a combination of dehydrated (just add water) and foods that needed a simmer.

                  For the dehydrated foods (morning coffee, dehydrated bacon and eggs, dehydrated sweet and sour chicken, etc...) the stove was a joy to use. It was very easy to light and brought the water to a boil quickly. It was very stable and I never had an issue with the arms of the stove gripping the pot. It also seemed to cool very quickly which made a big difference when I wanted to minimize the duration of my lunch breaks.

                  For the meals that required the water to be simmered (noodles), the stove worked well. During simmering, the fuel valve was slightly difficult to fine tune. It seemed like the spring on the lever for the fuel valve would slightly compress when the fine adjustments were made. Although it was a little annoying, it did not make a major impact in the positive impression I have of this stove.

                  The one negative that I encountered was that without any type of wind screen, the stove was a little difficult to use in high wind situations. Even when the stove was set to simmer, the flame was never blown out, but in windy situations, my pot would have to be repositioned so that the wind swept flame would be focused on the center of the pot. Moving the pot in this way seemed to cause a bit of instability and a higher risk of having the stove tip over. This situation was easily overcome by scouting a cooking site that provided shelter from the wind. If I were hiking in a location that was windy and did not have shelter, i would definitely invest in a wind screen.


                  Summary
                  The Snow Peak GST-100A is a great light weight and easy to use backpacking stove. The size of the folded stove made it hard not to bring it along, and ease of use made it a joy to cook with.


                  Pros
                  1 Light weight
                  2 Very small
                  3 Easy to light and use
                  4 Built to last

                  Cons
                  1 No supplied wind screen
                  2 Expensive
                • a_henrichs
                  Hey Chris, Nice job. The html looks great. I only have a few minor edits (two of which I missed the previous time). Once these are corrected, please post
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 9, 2009
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                    Hey Chris,

                    Nice job. The html looks great. I only have a few minor edits (two of which I missed the previous time). Once these are corrected, please post the revised version as well as the updated html file. Thanks!

                    Andy

                    > Height: 6' 2" (1.88 meters)
                    EDIT: replace ' and " with ft and in

                    > Weight: 185 (83.92 kg)
                    EDIT: 185 lb

                    > URL www.snowpeak.com
                    EDIT: this link needs to be clickable
                  • cwiseman73
                    Good catch Andy. I should have seen those issues myself. Here is the updated text file. The updated html can be found here http://tinyurl.com/nztkt6 Thanks so
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 9, 2009
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                      Good catch Andy. I should have seen those issues myself. Here is the updated text file. The updated html can be found here http://tinyurl.com/nztkt6

                      Thanks so much Andy and let me know if there is anything else that needs to be done.
                      -Chris




                      Owner Review of Snow Peak Giga Stove GST-100A

                      Name: Chris Wiseman
                      Age: 36
                      Gender: Male
                      Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 meters)
                      Weight: 185 lbs (83.92 kg)
                      Email address: cwise73 AT gmail DOT com
                      City, State, Country: Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
                      Date: June 26, 2009

                      Backpacking Background: I hike to get away from the stress of living and working in NYC. Most of my hikes are day trips using public transportation (subway, bus and train), but I do manage to work in as many multi-day outings as I can. I prefer to pack fairly light and look for difficult terrain or high mileage hikes.

                      Product information
                      Manufacturer Snow Peak
                      URL www.snowpeak.com
                      MSRP $74.95 USD
                      Listed weight 3.0oz / 87 grams
                      Weight as delivered 3.03oz/86.0 grams (3.84oz/108.8 grams with travel case)

                      <Image of the stove and the items that came with it>

                      Product description
                      This is a small and light weight stove with a built in auto ignition system. It uses screw on type butane/propane cartridges.
                      The stove arrives in a tiny but nice box and includes instructions in multiple languages and a hard plastic case. The plastic case measures 3.5 x 1.5 x 2 inches (89 x 38 x 51 mm).
                      The stove is very minimal in design and operation. It has four arms that fold out to support cookware. Unfolded the arms create a platform that measures 4.25 inches diagonally (108 mm diagonally). The flame is controlled with an adjustable valve that has an easily foldable spring loaded handle. The unit is lit using the built in auto igniter that is activated with the push of a small grey button.


                      On the Bench
                      Before using it in the field, I decided to test it out in the comforts of home. The stove screwed on very easily to the top of the fuel canister, and minimal force was needed to form a gas tight seal. The gas valve was easy to operate (very light force was needed to open and close the valve), and provided a wide range of flame output. The fuel valve handle was easy to grip and stayed cool during operation. The support arms folded out to create a large support area and seemed to provide a decent grip on my cooking pot. The auto ignite system ignited the stove on the first try ten times out of ten.

                      To get an idea of power output and fuel consumption of the Giga Stove, I decided to run a couple of test. I put one cup (8 fluid ounces) into a Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and timed the duration it took to bring the water to a very fast boil. A butane/propane/isobutane canister was used to fuel the stove. The canister was weighed before and after every test to determine the weight of the fuel used to bring the water to a boil.

                      <Image of the flame output for test 1>

                      Test one was with the valve of the stove opened up to the point where the visible flame could be seen to extend to the edge and slightly past the sides of the pot. This is normally a larger flame than I would use in the field. It took 2 minutes and 48 seconds to come to boil using 4.2 grams (.15 oz) of fuel.

                      <Image of the flame output for test 2>

                      In test two, I used a smaller flame that extended halfway from the center to the edge of the pot (about 1 inch / 25.4 mm from the edge). This flame output is very similar to what I use when I am using the stove in the field. The water was brought to a rapid boil in 3 minutes and 48 seconds and used 3.6 grams (.13 oz) of fuel.

                      <Image of the flame output for test 3>

                      The third test was a repeat of the second. I tried to maintain a similar flame size to what I use in the field. The boil time was 3 minutes and 56 seconds and the amount of fuel was 3.5 grams (.12 oz).


                      Field information


                      I had two basic criteria that needed to be met when I decided to buy a new stove. The first was light weight but durable, and the second was ease of use. The Giga Stove seemed like it hit the mark in both of these categories. I was able to find it for sale in a package that included the Snow Peak Trek 700 Ti cooking pot and the Snow Peak titanium spork, which looked like it would be a great way to get up and running with with very light cooking kit for solo camping.

                      Shortly after receiving the stove I went on a camping trip in Northern California. I spent three days in Salt Point State Park, and then spent three days in Yosemite. While in the pack, the Giga Stove would live in the supplied plastic case which provided plenty of protection. The stove was in daily use for breakfast, lunch and dinner. On this trip I used a combination of dehydrated (just add water) and foods that needed a simmer.

                      For the dehydrated foods (morning coffee, dehydrated bacon and eggs, dehydrated sweet and sour chicken, etc...) the stove was a joy to use. It was very easy to light and brought the water to a boil quickly. It was very stable and I never had an issue with the arms of the stove gripping the pot. It also seemed to cool very quickly which made a big difference when I wanted to minimize the duration of my lunch breaks.

                      For the meals that required the water to be simmered (noodles), the stove worked well. During simmering, the fuel valve was slightly difficult to fine tune. It seemed like the spring on the lever for the fuel valve would slightly compress when the fine adjustments were made. Although it was a little annoying, it did not make a major impact in the positive impression I have of this stove.

                      The one negative that I encountered was that without any type of wind screen, the stove was a little difficult to use in high wind situations. Even when the stove was set to simmer, the flame was never blown out, but in windy situations, my pot would have to be repositioned so that the wind swept flame would be focused on the center of the pot. Moving the pot in this way seemed to cause a bit of instability and a higher risk of having the stove tip over. This situation was easily overcome by scouting a cooking site that provided shelter from the wind. If I were hiking in a location that was windy and did not have shelter, i would definitely invest in a wind screen.


                      Summary
                      The Snow Peak GST-100A is a great light weight and easy to use backpacking stove. The size of the folded stove made it hard not to bring it along, and ease of use made it a joy to cook with.


                      Pros
                      1 Light weight
                      2 Very small
                      3 Easy to light and use
                      4 Built to last

                      Cons
                      1 No supplied wind screen
                      2 Expensive
                    • a_henrichs
                      Congratulations Chris, you are ready to upload your first Owner Review! Please upload it to Cook Gear Stoves Snow Peak Giga Power GST-100A This can also
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 13, 2009
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                        Congratulations Chris, you are ready to upload your first Owner Review! Please upload it to Cook Gear > Stoves > Snow Peak Giga Power GST-100A

                        This can also be found at: http://tinyurl.com/qnksq2

                        Log in to BGT, and then navigate to that folder. Click "Upload File,"
                        be sure to select the "Owner Review" button, and follow the
                        instructions to upload your HTML file and pictures.

                        After that, get started on your second Owner Review!

                        Andy
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