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EDIT- OR L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex - Kellie Carlisle

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  • pamwyant
    EDIT: OR - L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex – Kellie Carlisle Hi Kellie, Much improved organization on this repost. I have a few more
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 5, 2009
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      EDIT: OR - L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex –
      Kellie Carlisle

      Hi Kellie,

      Much improved organization on this repost. I have a few more edits
      for you, and once these are addressed, please Repost once more to
      this list. If that checks out, as I expect it will given how well
      you did with the last round of edits, then we'll move on to posting
      an HTML version in the test folder, and you will be nearly done.

      Pam

      **********************************************************************
      *********************************************

      City, State, Country: Ellicott City, MD, USA

      ### EDIT: I must have missed this one earlier – you need to spell
      out the state name. Since our reports are read internationally, not
      all readers are familiar with our state abbreviations, so we try to
      always spell them out.

      Date: 12/31/08

      ### EDIT: Remove this second instance of the date. You already have
      it where it belongs, just under the title. (I think some older
      examples have it later as you have done here, but we no longer do
      that)


      Backpacking Background: I have been day hiking for over 12 years and
      backpacked for 3 years and still have much left to learn. I hike
      with a service animal that must have gear too. I prefer hiking 10-15
      mi (16-24 km) each day, and take shorter 3-4 day trips about every
      six weeks. Every weekend I day hike with a group with varying between
      easy flat 4 mi treks to steep 16 mi rocky summit hikes. For
      overnight backpacking, I use a tent and consider myself a lightweight
      backpacker although I don't drill holes in toothbrushes. Terrain I
      encounter is very rocky, hilly, and in the Mid-Atlantic region with
      many of my hikes on sections of the Appalachian Trail.

      ### EDIT: Nice addition of information, but unfortunately your
      biography is now about 17 words too long. Try to keep the important
      thoughts and weed out 17 words.


      The front zipper is very rugged and made out of a type of non-
      metallic material which feels like a type of rubber. The front of
      the jacket has storm flaps on either side of the zipper which closes
      with both Velcro and snaps to ensure water does not leak in.

      ### EDIT: …which *close* with…

      ### Edit: Tell us a little bit here about the two way zipper, which
      you mention as a `dislike' in the summary.


      The inside of the collar has a microfleece layer to go against
      my chin. and was very comfortable when I used it in cold temperatures
      or in very windy and rainy conditions.

      ### EDIT: the period after chin should be a comma.


      In the field I have found the pockets to be large enough to
      facilitate even my, two way Garmin
      radio/GPS/NOAA weather radio which had been too large to fit in my
      other jacket pockets.

      ### Edit: The word `facilitate' is not really correct here as you
      use it. Facilitate means "to make easier" or "help bring about". So
      the pockets don't `facilitate' (or help) the radio. If you really
      want to use `facilitate' instead of `hold', you need to do some re-
      wording. Something like "I have found the large size of the pockets
      facilitate carrying my two way Garmin radio/GPS/NOAA weather radio in
      them, which is too large to fit in my other jacket pockets." OR:
      The large pockets facilitate carrying my two way Garmin
      radio/GPS/NOAA weather radio, which had been too large to fit in my
      other jacket pockets. In other words, the pockets can facilitate or
      help `carrying' the radio, but they can't facilitate or help the
      radio itself. Hopefully this makes sense.
    • Kellie Carlisle
      L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex Owner Review January 18, 2009 Reviewer Information Name: Kellie Carlisle Age: 39 Gender: Female Height:
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 18, 2009
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        L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex
        Owner Review
        January 18, 2009

        Reviewer Information
        Name: Kellie Carlisle
        Age: 39
        Gender: Female
        Height: 5'11" (1.80 m)
        Weight: 165 lb (75 kg)
        Email address: Kelliecar@...
        City, State, Country: Ellicott City, Maryland, USA

        Backpacking Background:
        I have been hiking for over 12 years. I hike with a service animal
        that must have gear too. I prefer hiking 10-15 mi (16-24 km) each
        day, and take 3-4 day backpack trips once a month. The hiking group I
        lead has hikes ranging from easy flat 4 mi (6 km) treks to steep 16
        mi (27 km) rocky summit hikes. I use a tent and am a lightweight
        backpacker although I don't drill holes in toothbrushes. Terrain I
        encounter is very rocky, hilly, and in the Mid-Atlantic region. I
        love to hike on sections of the Appalachian Trail.

        Product Information

        Manufacturer: L. L. Bean
        Year of manufacture: 2008
        Web site: www.llbean.com
        Manufacturer's Weight: none given
        Actual Weight: 1.2 Pounds (0.54 kg)
        Size: Women's X-Large
        Jacket Length: 28" (0.71 m)
        MSRP: $159.00

        Features Listed on Manufacturer's Website
        * Rugged Gore-Tex Performance Shell
        * A drawcord hood with an extended visor keeps rain off your face.
        * Two-way zipper.
        * Stows in its own pocket for easy packing.
        * Taped seams

        Product Description

        I purchased an X-Large blue jacket in March of 2008. I found the
        jacket to be very roomy and I am able to wear a 300 fleece under it.
        Occasionally, I have even worn expedition weight long underwear in
        addition to the fleece and was very comfortable. The cut in this
        year's model is a little longer than older models and this one is
        long enough in the back to overlap the matching pair of pants I
        purchased the same day.

        There are elastic draw cords in the hood and at the bottom of the
        jacket so I can customize the fit. The wrists cuffs have elastic
        which helps to keep them in place and are comfortable and not as
        scratchy as some Gortex products are. The cuffs also have a Velcro
        fastener strip to allow for a tighter fit if necessary.

        It took only a few seconds to stuff into its own pocket, specifically
        made for that purpose. When the jacket is stored in its pocket, it
        is fully enclosed in mesh, with only the zipper being exposed,
        allowing for easy storage which protects the outer shell of the
        jacket. The jacket can even be used as a pillow while camping.

        There are two large angled zip up pockets on both the left and right
        bottom front of the jacket. The pulls on the zippers are large enough
        to easily be zipped with a gloved hand. I found these to be just the
        right size for a pair of gloves and my phone. I especially appreciate
        the inside breast pocket which is perfect for passport, ID card, or
        slim wallet and doubles as the aforementioned stowaway pocket for the
        jacket.

        The front zipper is very rugged and made out of a type of non-
        metallic material which feels like a type of rubber. There are two
        sliders on the front zipper that allow for flexibility in airflow,
        but do not fit well along the bottom of the zipper. The perfect
        alignment of the two can make it unnecessarily troublesome to zip up
        the jacket. This is especially true if the wearer's vision and/or
        range of motion is hampered. The front of the jacket has storm flaps
        on either side of the zipper which close with both Velcro and snaps
        to ensure water does not leak in. And it works as well as promised
        because after over 50 hikes it has kept me dry!

        There are elastic draw cords at the bottom and hood with cord locks
        to keep things snug. The drawcord on the hood can be operated with
        one hand, and I found this easy to operate even with large gloves
        on. There is a Velcro strap on top of the hood for added
        customization. The hood has an extended visor that keeps rain off my
        face. The inside of the collar has a microfleece layer to go against
        my chin, and was very comfortable when I used it in cold temperatures
        or in very windy and rainy conditions.

        The women's jacket is available in the following colors at the time
        of this review: Carbon (dark grey), Colonial Red, Plum Grape, Sea
        Blue, Sprig (a medium shade of green), and Ultramarine (similar to
        Navy Blue). The jacket comes in Misses' Petite and Misses Regular
        sizes Small thru X-Large for the same price.

        In the spring I keep the jacket in my daypack and if on overnight
        trips in my backpack. Its compact size makes it very easy to fit in
        my pack. Its light weight allows me to take it any where I go without
        having to worry about much extra weight in my pack. The fact that it
        stores in a mesh pocket keeps me from worrying about damaging the
        Gortex component of the jacket. In the field I have found the
        pockets to be large enough to facilitate even my two way Garmin
        radio/GPS/NOAA weather radio, which had been too large to fit in my
        other jacket pockets.

        Field Conditions
        I have had the opportunity to wear this jacket tons since I lead
        hikes each Saturday and Sunday and I average 25-30 mi (40-48 km) of
        day hiking over each weekend.

        I wear this jacket three seasons - fall, winter, and spring as I do
        not wear rain gear when it is hot outside. I enjoy the refreshing
        rain when it is over 90 F (32 C)! In the fall, when temperatures
        ranged from 40-55 F (6 -13 C), I wore this jacket when I needed
        protection from wind and rain. It definitely lived up to its name.
        I was bouldering on top of a mountain peak in the Appalachian
        Mountains on a three day backpack trip on a nice fall day when
        suddenly a nasty rain storm crept up. It was blowing so hard it
        seemed as if the rain was coming at us sideways and I was the only
        one out of our group of 18 hikers to keep not only dry but also
        comfortable and not overheated. I believe this was due to the mesh
        liner of the jacket which allows for some ventilation and keeps the
        jacket from sticking to my sweaty body after hiking 15 mi (24 km).
        When the temperature dropped I added a 300 fleece underneath and
        found the jacket to still be roomy!

        Over the winter I used this as mandatory gear for every hike. When
        the temperature was below 20 F (-7 C) my base layer was a mid weight
        Polartec long underwear top followed by a non cotton short sleeve
        hiking shirt and then a 300 fleece and my jacket as the outer most
        layer. When I needed to shed after I heated up after a few miles on
        the trail I would remove the fleece and be very comfortable in just
        the long underwear and light hiking shirt under the jacket. This is
        the ultimate outer layer for my winter hiking clothes. No matter
        what Mother Nature threw my way my jacket kept me comfortable. The
        jacket is extremely rugged as I wore it while bouldering on a
        mountain peak which required sliding along several large boulders.
        It held up to conditions which have torn other jackets in the past.

        Summary
        Rain beads off of this jacket better than any other I have seen and
        it is not as hot to wear as similar products I have tried. The mesh
        liner inside this jacket keeps it from sticking when I work up a
        sweat and provides some circulation to keep me from overheating. All
        pockets are well lined and roomy. The jacket has a good skin feel and
        breathability, and has been exceptional at keeping the rain off. The
        hood is roomy and provides good flexibility for form fitting. This
        is a very lightweight jacket and the most rugged and comfortable
        Gortex jacket I have worn to date.

        All in all I have worn this jacket for hundreds if not close to a
        thousand miles and I have yet to be disappointed by it. I am a
        difficult hiker to please as I expect equipment to live up to its
        promises. I have tried several other jackets over the past couple of
        years and so far this is as good as it gets.

        Simply put, the L. L. Bean Stowaway Rainwear Jacket with Gore-Tex has
        become a staple in my hiking wardrobe. It's lightweight yet very
        rugged design is perfect for three season backpacking and the
        convenience of the jacket stowing in its own pocket keeps me from
        having to keep up with a separate stuff sack or trying to fold or
        roll it up and find a place for it in my daypack or backpack. It
        folds up small enough I even carry it in my purse for sporting events.

        Things I like about this jacket:
        • Completely water and windproof as guaranteed by the manufacturer
        • Stows in its own pocket in just seconds
        • Rugged enough for rock climbing and bouldering, even if slipping on
        leaves on the trail and falling on my tushy!
        • Adjustable hood

        Things I don't like about this jacket
        • The two-way zipper can sometimes be tricky to line up but after
        using the jacket a few times I got this down.
      • pamwyant
        Kellie, Your changes were perfect. I did not find anything else to correct. You now need to upload the HTML version to the Owner Review Test Folder on
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 21, 2009
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          Kellie,

          Your changes were perfect. I did not find anything else to correct.
          You now need to upload the HTML version to the Owner Review Test
          Folder on backpackgeartest.org, link here:

          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/

          You will need to be logged into the site in order to upload. If you
          have any problems, you can read this for help:

          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=Bylaws&page=90

          If that doesn't solve your problem, there is a group staffed by HTML-
          savvy members that can help, link here:

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTFileUploadHelp/

          Once you've uploaded the HTML version, just post a link here on this
          group and I'll give it the HTML a final once-over before posting
          approval for you to upload to a permanent folder.

          Pam
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