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EDIT: Owner Review - Kelty Women's Light Year 25 - Sophie Pearson

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  • pamwyant
    EDIT: Kelty Women s Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag Owner Review – Sophie Pearson Hi Sophie, Thanks for a well written review. I found very few grammatical
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 4 12:43 PM
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      EDIT: Kelty Women's Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag Owner Review –
      Sophie Pearson

      Hi Sophie,

      Thanks for a well written review. I found very few grammatical or
      spelling errors, but I would like to see more information provided in
      some areas and a few things that might benefit from some re-wording.

      Your edits follow, in this convention:

      EDIT: Mandatory correction

      Edit: A request for more information or different wording.
      Something needs corrected, but you have some discretion in how to do
      so.

      Comment: Something for you to think about doing.

      I've also thrown in a few `edit/comment' which means something struck
      me as odd, but if you can give me a good explanation I'll let it
      pass. <grin> Otherwise, correct as if it were an `edit'.

      When you've finished the revisions, please repost here using the
      word "Repost" in the title, and upload the revised HTML version to
      the test folder.

      Pam

      *********************************

      Manufacturer My bag
      Minimum temperature 20 F (-7 C) 25 F (-4 C)
      Weight in stuff sack 3 lb (1.36 kg) 2 lb 2 oz (0.96 kg)

      ### EDIT: The Kelty website lists 2 lb. 9 oz. / 1.2 kg for the
      women's long.

      Length 80" (2.03") 79" (2.00 m)

      ### EDIT: 2.03 m (not 2.03")

      Stuff sack diameter 9" (0.23 m) 7" (0.18 m)
      Stuff sack height 16" (0.41 m) 12.5" (0.32 m)

      ### EDIT: From the Manufacturer website: Stuffed diameter: 7" / 18
      cm Stuffed length: 14" / 36 cm

      ### Comment: It might be useful to the reader to weigh the stuff
      sack separately. Some users prefer to replace the manufacturer stuff
      sack with another, so knowing what the bag weighs without it is
      useful information. (One way to do this is to weigh bag in stuff
      sack, then stuff sack alone, and subtract to get the bag only weight)

      The zips have material flaps that sit under them when they are
      closed, which have a grey and white pattern.

      ### Comment: This is worded a little awkwardly – since the material
      description occurs much later in the sentence. I believe what you
      are referring to is commonly called a zipper guard, to keep the
      zipper from snagging the draft tube? I suggest re-wording to
      something like this:
      A grey and white patterned fabric zipper guard lies behind the zips.


      The bag comes in a large orange cotton bag for storage, and a much
      smaller
      black stuff sack for packing.

      ### Edit/comment: I don't think the bag `comes' in both stuff
      sacks. I'd suggest changing this to "comes with" instead of "comes
      in", or state that it comes in the large cotton bag and *with* a
      smaller stuff bag.

      ### Edit: We really need a little more information about the bag
      features. Kelty mentions that the hood drawcords are different from
      each other (an important feature for some users when they want to
      tighten or loosen parts of the bag at night); liner loops, external
      snap loops, and hang loops; draft tubes; hood and collar baffles; and
      a "Micro captured cordlock". Tell us a little about these features –
      I'm particularly curious about the cordlock – I've never heard
      of "Micro captured cordlock". Also, tell us about the construction
      of the bag – (box baffle), the wave stitching, ground level seams
      and whether these methods of construction have any advantage that you
      can tell. Tell us about the exterior and interior fabric and the
      down fill power.

      Field information
      I first got this bag for a 10-day trip to Yellowstone and the Grand
      Tetons. Although it was summer, we saw enough change in elevation that
      we camped in the snow one night. It has also been on numerous trips
      around Florida, backpacking and car camping, plus a four-day trip to
      Georgia in the fall.

      ### Edit: We really need some indication of temperature ranges,
      which is very important in a sleeping bag review, and weather
      conditions (i.e. any rain or wind? Humid or dry?). Can you also
      tell us about the general type of shelters you've used it with? I
      know you mention bivy in your biography – have you used this bag with
      a bivy? When you're car camping are you using a family style tent?
      Have you used it with a backpacking tent? Any other shelters?


      I'm not sure how much difference the half-zip makes in weight but it
      actually suits me really well because I never used to undo my old bag
      the whole way, and it is less seam to break or catch or let air in.

      ### Edit: This isn't exactly clear as written – Do you mean the
      zipper is less likely to catch on the fabric since it isn't as long?
      And that there is less of a draft tube because the shorter zipper
      doesn't need as much backing to prevent air from coming in? Please
      try to re-word more specifically. You may need to break it into two
      or three sentences.

      Because of the mummy shape, I don't find that this type of bag opens
      out when fully unzipped anyway, but I can see that this might annoy
      some people.

      ### Edit/comment: I really don't understand this either. Are you
      talking about mummy bags in general? What do you mean when you say
      they don't open up fully? Are you talking about the foot box not
      opening, or something else? Also, we prefer not to project what
      other people might feel (i.e. this might annoy some people). Just
      tell us about your experience.

      With my feet sticking out of the zip at the end I have
      not found it too hot, even in Florida in the summer. I have however
      had some problems with getting cold.

      ### Edit: We need some idea of the temperatures you've used it in –
      minimum and maximum.

      I don't know if this is a problem with the bag, or a parculiarity of
      mine, but I have not
      found it with other bags and I have plenty of padding in that area!


      ### EDIT: spelling of peculiarity

      ### Comment: Have you noticed any difference in performance with
      different shelters in regard to getting cold in the hip area?

      My only other complaint is that the baffles to pull the hood tight
      are on
      the outside and hooked about 2" (5 cm) from the opening.

      ### Edit/comment: Do you mean the drawcord is on the outside? And
      what do you mean by hooked? Do you mean the draw cord is permanently
      attached to an area of the bag? When I think of hooked, I think of
      something that fastens and unfastens to attach. Can you describe
      this a little better?

      The bag is really soft and feels fairly padded. It is also not as
      slippery as synthetic bags.

      ### Edit: This is a little misleading, since the exterior of the bag
      is synthetic – it is simply the fill that is `natural' down.

      I used to strap my old synthetic bag to my pad to stop it sliding
      off, but this bag doesn't need that.

      ### Comment: Do you think it is the down or the fabric on the
      exterior that contributes to this? I think this needs re-worded to
      reflect the exterior material isn't as slippery rather than the fact
      that this bag has down fill instead of synthetic fill.

      It is also less rustly than my synthetic bag, which I really like
      because I tend
      to be the last to bed and move around a lot in my sleep.

      ### EDIT: I can't seem to find a proper spelling for what you are
      trying to get across with "rustly'. I suggest changing it to "It
      also rustles less than my…."

      I have heard a lot about down having issues when it gets wet so I
      have kept the bag
      in a plastic bag whenever I am outside.

      ### Edit/comment: I think you mean you have kept the bag in a
      plastic bag whenever you have it in your pack? Surely you are not
      sleeping in it inside a plastic bag? Also, you might add whether you
      are using the plastic bag inside the stuff sack, outside it, or
      replacing the stuff sack.

      I have not tested the performance when wet yet (and hopefully never
      will!) and in damp fog
      it kept its warmth just fine.

      ### Comment: You've mentioned being cold, yet it kept it's warmth
      fine? This seems contradictory. Perhaps specifying the temperature
      that you used it in fog would be helpful to gain some insight on this.


      Summary
      A small, light-weight bag that is still in mint condition after 2
      years and many outings.

      ### Comment: This is a sentence fragment, and you might want to word
      it to be a full sentence.

      A right-opening half-zip keeps weight down and
      warmth in while a foot zip has kept me cool in hotter weather. Extra
      padding at the foot and shoulders has really kept me warm, although in
      the coldest weather I have experienced, my bottom gets cold.

      ### Comment: Again, we need some idea of the temperature ranges. Is
      there a temperature that you've found it too hot? What range do you
      find it most comfortable? How cold does it have to be before you
      feel cold? Do you feel cold anywhere other than the hip area? Also,
      I was under the impression that most women's bags had extra
      insulation in the foot and torso areas (not in the shoulder area). I
      can't seem to find information on this on the Kelty website, so do
      you have a source that states extra insulation in the shoulder area,
      or would it better be described as in the torso area?

      Overall a really nice backpacking bag, but I would want something
      more for temperatures
      towards the bottom of the range they list it for.

      ### Edit/comment: This is worded a little awkwardly – I had to read
      it twice before I figured it out. I'd suggest something like
      this: "Overall a really nice backpacking bag, but not quite warm
      enough for me at the lower end of the rated temperature range."

      Pros:
      Light
      Packs small
      Half-zip
      Foot zip for ventilation

      Cons:
      My bottom gets cold in this bag!

      ### EDIT: Describe temperature range it gets cold.

      Cannot pull the hood as tight as I would like
      Have to worry about the bag getting wet in the rain

      ### Edit/comment: You really didn't talk much in the report body
      about worrying about the bag getting wet. Is there a specific reason
      you would worry? Do you know if the bag has any water resistant
      features to the shell? Many of us have heard and considered the down
      vs. synthetic debate, and make our choices based on our needs.
      Unless you have a specific reason for worrying about this particular
      bag getting wet, I don't think this should be listed as a con, as
      this is more of a skills issue (learning to keep a bag dry) for the
      most part. (After all, don't we also try to keep our synthetic
      sleeping bags dry? Would you really want to sleep in a wet synthetic
      bag?) Which also brings up another question you might answer in the
      body of the report – have you had any condensation in a shelter when
      you've used this bag? If so, did the bag absorb or shed the
      moisture?
    • Sophie
      Dear Pam, Thank you for your suggestions, I have made the edits and uploaded it to
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 8 5:50 PM
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        Dear Pam,
        Thank you for your suggestions, I have made the edits and uploaded it
        to
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Kelty%20Women%2025%20Down%20Sleeping%20Bag%20-%20S%20Pearson/
        Thanks a lot,
        Sophie



        Kelty Women's Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag
        Owner Review
        July 8, 2008


        Reviewer Information
        Name: Sophie Pearson
        Age: 26
        Gender: Female
        Height: 5' 8” (1.71 m)
        Weight: 179 lb (81 kg)
        Sleeping bag length: Long
        Email address: sophiep3 at gmail dot com
        Location: Tampa, Florida USA



        Backpacking Background
        I first started backpacking as a teenager in England. I did a
        month-long trip in the Arctic but most of my backpacking experience
        has been weekend to 10-day trips, in a range of terrains and climates.
        I am a volcanologist so also do day hikes carrying loaded packs over
        intense terrain. Nowadays I am nearly always in sub-tropical or
        tropical climates. I am heading more and more towards ultralight
        packing, and unless I am sharing I use a bivy rather than a tent. I
        try to pack under 20 lb (9 kg) for long weekend trips but have carried
        over 50 lb (23 kg).



        Product Information
        Manufacturer: Kelty
        Year of manufacture: 2006
        URL: www.kelty.com
        MSRP: $190
        The bag they now make is specified to a lower temperature and has
        slightly different dimensions but the design is identical.

        Manufacturer My bag
        Minimum temperature 20 F (-7 C) 25 F (-4 C)
        Length 80 in (2.03 m) 79 in (2.00 m)
        Width at shoulder 59 in (1.50 m) 50 in (1.27 m)
        Width at foot 13 in (0.33 m)
        Weight 2lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
        Weight in stuff sack 2 lb 9 oz (1.20 kg) 2 lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
        Stuff sack diameter 9 in (0.23 m) 7 in (0.18 m)
        Stuff sack length 16 in (0.41 m) 14 in (0.36 m)
        Storage bag diameter 12.5 in (0.32 m)
        Storage bag height 20 in (0.51 m)




        Product Description
        The Kelty Women's Light Year is a 3 season down sleeping bag designed
        specifically for women. It has 650-fill goose down, with extra padding
        at the feet and torso, and a synthetic polyester shell. It has
        slant-baffle construction and ground-level side seams to minimize heat
        loss. The outside top is light blue (the newer ones are yellow) and
        the bottom and inside are grey. The bag is mummy style and has 2
        pull-cords around the head opening. The one across the front of the
        bag is yellow and black string, the one around the top of the hood is
        a 0.25 in (0.65 cm) wide flat black ribbon cord. They both go through
        the same cordlock but can be pulled separately. The cordlock is
        attached to a loop on the outside of the bag about 2 in (5cm) from the
        opening. The opening zip is on the right side from the inside and
        reaches half-way down, to about level with the hips. It is backed by a
        grey and white patterened fabric zipper guard. There is a velcro strip
        across the top of the zip to secure the bag shut. The zippers have the
        yellow and black string attached to them to make them easier to pull.
        There is also a zip running along the bottom of the bag. There are 2
        loops on the outside of the bag near the head and 2 near the feet made
        from the outer fabric of the bag. There are also 2 on the inside
        attached to the liner. On either side of the foot zip are similar but
        larger loops to hang the bag. There are also 4 loops made of grey
        ribbon cord about 1/3 and 2/3 down the sides of the bag. The bag comes
        with a large orange cotton bag for storage, and a much smaller black
        stuff sack for packing.



        Field Information
        I first got this bag for a 10-day trip to Yellowstone and the Grand
        Tetons in summer 2006. The temperatures averaged around 45 F (7 C) at
        night but dropped to about 30 F (-1 C) when we hiked up to higher
        elevation, where there was snow on the ground. I have also taken it on
        numerous trips around Florida, backpacking and car camping, where
        temperatures have reached 90 F (32 C) and rarely drop below 50 F (10
        C). I used the bag during a four-day trip to Georgia in the fall,
        where it was consistently damp and drizzly and temperatures were
        around 45 F (7 C) at night. I have used it in my 2-person backpacking
        tent on my own and sharing, and in my bivy bag.



        Review
        The first thing I noticed about this bag is how light it is. Compared
        to my synthetic, 4+ season bag the difference is incredible. It also
        packs really small, without having to fight with the stuff sack or use
        compression straps. I like the fact that it came in a large bag for
        storage too, so that the down doesn't lose its fluffiness.

        The bag is rated for 3 seasons, down to 25 F (-4 C). I have used it in
        temperatures from 90 F (32 C) to about 30 F (-1 C). With my feet
        sticking out of the zip at the end I have not found it too hot, even
        in Florida in the summer. I have however had some problems with
        getting cold. Because it is designed for women, there is extra padding
        at the feet and this really has made a difference. The problem for me
        is my bottom - I tend to sleep on my side and my bottom ends up
        touching the bag near the bottom of the zip and has got so cold it has
        gone numb in the past! This happened one night in the Grand Tetons,
        when I was sharing a tent and temperatures got down to 30 F (-1 C),
        and a couple of times when I have been sleeping on my own in my
        2-person backpacking tent in Floridian winter, at temperatures of
        around 40 F (4 C). I haven't noticed it when I am sleeping in my bivy
        bag. I don't know if this is a problem with the sleeping bag, or a
        peculiarity of mine, but I have not found it with other bags, and I
        have plenty of padding in that area! For me it's an acceptable
        trade-off because my feet have always got really cold really quickly
        until I bought this bag, and I find it easier to warm up my bottom
        than my feet.

        I'm not sure how much difference the half-zip makes in weight but it
        actually suits me really well because I have a habit of catching zips
        and there is less zip to catch, plus less draft tube that can let air
        in. I don't use a mummy style sleeping bag as a quilt because of the
        footbox, so the half zip is not a problem there. They list features
        like ground-level side seams and slant-baffle construction but I don't
        really have a reference to know if those improve heat retention.

        I initially thought that the number of loops was a bit over-kill, but
        I found I have used them more than I realised. I initially used the
        loops 1/3 and 2/3 of the way down to strap my bag to my pad, until I
        realised that the shell of the bag is much less slippery than my old
        one and doesn't need it. The foot loops are great for hanging up the
        bag to air when I get back from a trip. Kelty says that some of the
        loops are designed to allow the bag to be used as a liner, but I
        haven't tested that. One complaint I have is that the hood cordlock is
        attached to an outside loop and I have not found a way to pull the
        hood tight without my hand sticking out. This is a bit awkward, and
        leaves a gap where cold can get in.

        The bag is really soft and feels fairly padded. Over the 2 years I
        have had it the down does not seem to have lost much loft. The shell
        of the bag rustles much less than my old synthetic bag, which I really
        like because I tend to be the last to bed and move around a lot in my
        sleep. I initially worried about getting a down bag because of how
        long it takes to dry off and become usable again if it gets wet. I
        have kept the bag in the stuff sack in a plastic bag whenever I am
        outside, and have not noticed any moisture issues even in damp,
        drizzly fog. I (reluctantly because of the moisture issue) took the
        bag on a 3 day kayaking trip but the dry bag did its job perfectly. I
        have therefore not tested the performance when wet yet (and hopefully
        never will!) but my tent has ended up with quite a lot of moisture in
        it during rain storms and the moisture-wicking synthetic shell seems
        to have kept all of the damp out of the down.



        Summary
        The Kelty Women's Light Year Down sleeping bag is a small,
        light-weight 3 season sleeping bag that appears to have suffered
        little from 2 years of use and many outings. The right-opening
        half-zip has kept weight down and warmth in while a foot zip has kept
        me cool in hotter weather. Extra padding at the foot and torso really
        keeps me warm, although when the temperatures drop below 40 F (4 C) my
        bottom sometimes gets cold. My only other complaint is that the hood
        cordlock is on the outside which means that the tightest the hood can
        be pulled is with a hand sticking out. Overall a really nice
        backpacking sleeping bag, but not quite warm enough for me at the
        lower end of the rated temperature range.

        Pros:
        Light
        Packs small
        Half-zip
        Foot zip for ventilation

        Cons:
        My bottom gets cold in this bag at low temperatures
        Cannot pull the hood as tight as I would like
      • pamwyant
        Kelty Women s Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag Owner Review - Sophie Pearson Sophie, Excellent job providing the extra information! I have only a few simple
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 13 8:08 PM
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          Kelty Women's Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag Owner Review - Sophie
          Pearson

          Sophie,

          Excellent job providing the extra information! I have only a few
          simple edits for you to address in this version. Once you've made
          the corrections, please Repost again to the list and reload the HTML
          version to the test folder one more time so that I can re-check it
          before issuing final approval. You're nearly there!

          Pam


          Manufacturer My bag
          Minimum temperature 20 F (-7 C) 25 F (-4 C)
          Length 80 in (2.03 m) 79 in (2.00 m)
          Width at shoulder 59 in (1.50 m) 50 in (1.27 m)
          Width at foot 13 in (0.33 m)
          Weight 2lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
          Weight in stuff sack 2 lb 9 oz (1.20 kg) 2 lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
          Stuff sack diameter 9 in (0.23 m) 7 in (0.18 m)
          Stuff sack length 16 in (0.41 m) 14 in (0.36 m)
          Storage bag diameter 12.5 in (0.32 m)
          Storage bag height 20 in (0.51 m)

          ### EDIT: Some of your information is still not correct. As called
          for in the prior edit, the manufacturer website specifies: Stuffed
          diameter: 7" / 18 cm Stuffed length: 14" / 36 cm. Also, the
          manufacturer does not list whether the weight includes the stuff
          sack. Normally sleeping bag weight is for the sleeping bag only, so
          that should be changed to sleeping bag weight, unless you have
          confirmation from Kelty that they have included the stuff sack in the
          weight also. Finally, your weight in stuff sack and weight of bag
          alone is the same. That is one light stuff sack – can I get one?
          <grin> Double check your weight and make sure you have the right one
          in each spot please.

          It is backed by a grey and white patterened fabric zipper guard.

          ### EDIT: spelling of "patterned"

          There is a velcro strip across the top of the zip to secure the bag
          shut.

          ### EDIT: If you know that the fastener is brand name Velcro, it
          should be capitalized. If you cannot confirm that it is Velcro
          brand, you should use "hook and loop fastener" instead.

          They list features like ground-level side seams and slant-baffle
          construction but I don't
          really have a reference to know if those improve heat retention.

          ### Edit/comment: This sounds a little odd. At the least you need
          to use "Kelty's website lists features…" instead of the
          generic `they'. What I would prefer to see is for you to re-word to
          something simple like this: "Kelty uses ground-level seams and slant-
          baffle construction in this bag, features which are supposed to
          increase heat retention.


          I initially thought that the number of loops was a bit over-kill, but
          I found I have used them more than I realised.

          ### EDIT: Spelling of "realized"

          I initially used the
          loops 1/3 and 2/3 of the way down to strap my bag to my pad, until I
          realised that the shell of the bag is much less slippery than my old
          one and doesn't need it.

          ### Spelling of "realized"
        • Sophie
          Dear Pam, Thanks for the edits. Sorry, thought I had changed those sizes etc. The stuff sack is less than 1 oz, hence the weight not changing. Hope I got them
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 14 11:33 PM
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            Dear Pam,
            Thanks for the edits. Sorry, thought I had changed those sizes etc.
            The stuff sack is less than 1 oz, hence the weight not changing. Hope
            I got them this time!
            Cheers,
            Sophie



            http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%20Kelty%20Womens%20Light%20Year%2025%20Bag%20-%20S%20Pearson/

            Kelty Women's Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag
            Owner Review
            July 8, 2008

            Reviewer Information
            Name: Sophie Pearson
            Age: 26
            Gender: Female
            Height: 5' 8" (1.71 m)
            Weight: 179 lb (81 kg)
            Sleeping bag length: Long
            Email address: sophiep3 at gmail dot com
            Location: Tampa, Florida USA

            Backpacking Background
            I first started backpacking as a teenager in England. I did a
            month-long trip in the Arctic but most of my backpacking experience
            has been weekend to 10-day trips, in a range of terrains and climates.
            I am a volcanologist so also do day hikes carrying loaded packs over
            intense terrain. Nowadays I am nearly always in sub-tropical or
            tropical climates. I am heading more and more towards ultralight
            packing, and unless I am sharing I use a bivy rather than a tent. I
            try to pack under 20 lb (9 kg) for long weekend trips but have carried
            over 50 lb (23 kg).

            Product Information bag
            Manufacturer: Kelty
            Year of manufacture: 2006
            URL: www.kelty.com
            MSRP: $190
            The bag they now make is specified to a lower temperature and has
            slightly different dimensions but the design is identical.

            Manufacturer My bag
            Minimum temperature 20 F (-7 C) 25 F (-4 C)
            Length 80 in (2.03 m) 79 in (2.00 m)
            Width at shoulder 59 in (1.50 m) 50 in (1.27 m)
            Width at foot 13 in (0.33 m)
            Weight 2 lb 9 oz (1.20 kg) 2lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
            Weight in stuff sack 2 lb 2 oz (0.96 kg)
            Stuff sack diameter 7 in (0.18 m) 7 in (0.18 m)
            Stuff sack length 14 in (0.36 m) 14 in (0.36 m)
            Storage bag diameter 12.5 in (0.32 m)
            Storage bag height 20 in (0.51 m)

            Product Description
            The Kelty Women's Light Year is a 3 season down sleeping bag designed
            specifically for women. It has 650-fill goose down, with extra padding
            at the feet and torso, and a synthetic polyester shell. It has
            slant-baffle construction and ground-level side seams to minimize heat
            loss. The outside top is light blue (the newer ones are yellow) and
            the bottom and inside are grey. The bag is mummy style and has 2
            pull-cords around the head opening. The one across the front of the
            bag is yellow and black string, the one around the top of the hood is
            a 0.25 in (0.65 cm) wide flat black ribbon cord. They both go through
            the same cordlock but can be pulled separately. The cordlock is
            attached to a loop on the outside of the bag about 2 in (5cm) from the
            opening. The opening zip is on the right side from the inside and
            reaches half-way down, to about level with the hips. It is backed by a
            grey and white patterned fabric zipper guard. There is a hook and loop
            fastener across the top of the zip to secure the bag shut. The zippers
            have the yellow and black string attached to them to make them easier
            to pull. There is also a zip running along the bottom of the bag.
            There are 2 loops on the outside of the bag near the head and 2 near
            the feet made from the outer fabric of the bag. There are also 2 on
            the inside attached to the liner. On either side of the foot zip are
            similar but larger loops to hang the bag. There are also 4 loops made
            of grey ribbon cord about 1/3 and 2/3 down the sides of the bag. The
            bag comes with a large orange cotton bag for storage, and a much
            smaller black stuff sack for packing.

            Field Information
            I first got this bag for a 10-day trip to Yellowstone and the Grand
            Tetons in summer 2006. The temperatures averaged around 45 F (7 C) at
            night but dropped to about 30 F (-1 C) when we hiked up to higher
            elevation, where there was snow on the ground. I have also taken it on
            numerous trips around Florida, backpacking and car camping, where
            temperatures have reached 90 F (32 C) and rarely drop below 50 F (10
            C). I used the bag during a four-day trip to Georgia in the fall,
            where it was consistently damp and drizzly and temperatures were
            around 45 F (7 C) at night. I have used it in my 2-person backpacking
            tent on my own and sharing, and in my bivy bag.

            Review
            stuffed The first thing I noticed about this bag is how light it is.
            Compared to my synthetic, 4+ season bag the difference is incredible.
            It also packs really small, without having to fight with the stuff
            sack or use compression straps. I like the fact that it came in a
            large bag for storage too, so that the down doesn't lose its fluffiness.

            The bag is rated for 3 seasons, down to 25 F (-4 C). I have used it in
            temperatures from 90 F (32 C) to about 30 F (-1 C). With my feet
            sticking out of the zip at the end I have not found it too hot, even
            in Florida in the summer. I have however had some problems with
            getting cold. Because it is designed for women, there is extra padding
            at the feet and this really has made a difference. The problem for me
            is my bottom - I tend to sleep on my side and my bottom ends up
            touching the bag near the bottom of the zip and has got so cold it has
            gone numb in the past! This happened one night in the Grand Tetons,
            when I was sharing a tent and temperatures got down to 30 F (-1 C),
            and a couple of times when I have been sleeping on my own in my
            2-person backpacking tent in Floridian winter, at temperatures of
            around 40 F (4 C). I haven't noticed it when I am sleeping in my bivy
            bag. I don't know if this is a problem with the sleeping bag, or a
            peculiarity of mine, but I have not found it with other bags, and I
            have plenty of padding in that area! For me it's an acceptable
            trade-off because my feet have always got really cold really quickly
            until I bought this bag, and I find it easier to warm up my bottom
            than my feet.

            I'm not sure how much difference the half-zip makes in weight but it
            actually suits me really well because I have a habit of catching zips
            and there is less zip to catch, plus less draft tube that can let air
            in. I don't use a mummy style sleeping bag as a quilt because of the
            footbox, so the half zip is not a problem there. The bag has
            ground-level seams and slant-baffle construction that are supposed to
            increase heat retention, but I can't really tell if they help.

            I initially thought that the number of loops was a bit over-kill, but
            I found I have used them more than I realized. I initially used the
            loops 1/3 and 2/3 of the way down to strap my bag to my pad, until I
            realized that the shell of the bag is much less slippery than my old
            one and doesn't need it. The foot loops are great for hanging up the
            bag to air when I get back from a trip. Kelty says that some of the
            loops are designed to allow the bag to be used as a liner, but I
            haven't tested that. One complaint I have is that the hood cordlock is
            attached to an outside loop and I have not found a way to pull the
            hood tight without my hand sticking out. This is a bit awkward, and
            leaves a gap where cold can get in.

            The bag is really soft and feels fairly padded. Over the 2 years I
            have had it the down does not seem to have lost much loft. The shell
            of the bag rustles much less than my old synthetic bag, which I really
            like because I tend to be the last to bed and move around a lot in my
            sleep. I initially worried about getting a down bag because of how
            long it takes to dry off and become usable again if it gets wet. I
            have kept the bag in the stuff sack in a plastic bag whenever I am
            outside, and have not noticed any moisture issues even in damp,
            drizzly fog. I (reluctantly because of the moisture issue) took the
            bag on a 3 day kayaking trip but the dry bag did its job perfectly. I
            have therefore not tested the performance when wet yet (and hopefully
            never will!) but my tent has ended up with quite a lot of moisture in
            it during rain storms and the moisture-wicking synthetic shell seems
            to have kept all of the damp out of the down.

            Summary
            The Kelty Women's Light Year Down sleeping bag is a small,
            light-weight 3 season sleeping bag that appears to have suffered
            little from 2 years of use and many outings. The right-opening
            half-zip has kept weight down and warmth in while a foot zip has kept
            me cool in hotter weather. Extra padding at the foot and torso really
            keeps me warm, although when the temperatures drop below 40 F (4 C) my
            bottom sometimes gets cold. My only other complaint is that the hood
            cordlock is on the outside which means that the tightest the hood can
            be pulled is with a hand sticking out. Overall a really nice
            backpacking sleeping bag, but not quite warm enough for me at the
            lower end of the rated temperature range.

            Pros:
            Light
            Packs small
            Half-zip
            Foot zip for ventilation

            Cons:
            My bottom gets cold in this bag at low temperatures
            Cannot pull the hood as tight as I would like
          • pamwyant
            Hi Sophie, with the changes, your report is approved and you may upload to this folder: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Sleep%20Gear/Sleeping%
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 16 7:52 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Sophie, with the changes, your report is approved and you may
              upload to this folder:

              http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Sleep%20Gear/Sleeping%
              20Bags/Kelty%20Light%20Year%2025%20Down%20Bag/

              OR: http://tinyurl.com/6hst2w

              You will need to be logged in to upload. Please be sure to select
              the 'Owner Review' button, and to delete your report copy in the test
              folder.

              If this is your second approved review (which I believe it is) and
              you have submitted a Tester Agreement which has been acknowledged,
              you are now eligible to participate in the testing process by
              applying for tests. Further details at

              http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=BecomeTester&page=9

              If you haven't already, you will also need to join:

              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/backpackgeartesters/

              This is where everything related to Tests and Testing takes place.
              When you first join, you will be on moderation, so if you post right
              away, don't be surprised if it doesn't show up immediately.

              One thing I do want to mention is that you may not see test calls for
              a few weeks, as our test call crew is on a brief hiatus as
              manufacturer's get ready for the big outdoor gear show coming up in
              August. There is one test call that has just been extended to
              Friday, so if you hurry you might get an application in for that.
              The information is in message #47287 on the above referenced yahoo
              group.

              Please don't stop writing Owner Reviews. While you are waiting on
              test calls to resume after the Outdoor Retailer show, this would be a
              good time to get an extra one or two in. The more Owner
              Reviews you write, the better you will get at report writing and
              this won't go unnoticed when Test Moderators are choosing testers.
              Also, most months we have a call for Owner Reviews in certain
              categories. Getting an approved Owner Review completed for the
              monthly call gives the reviewer a "Brownie Point" which can help in
              test selection. This month's call is for items either in the
              Personal Hygiene, Health and Safety, or Books categories.

              Congratulations on completing your second Owner Review!

              Pam

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Sophie" <sophiep3@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Dear Pam,
              > Thanks for the edits. Sorry, thought I had changed those sizes etc.
              > The stuff sack is less than 1 oz, hence the weight not changing.
              Hope
              > I got them this time!
              > Cheers,
              > Sophie
              >
              >
              >
              > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR%20-%
              20Kelty%20Womens%20Light%20Year%2025%20Bag%20-%20S%20Pearson/
              >
              > Kelty Women's Light Year 25 Down Sleeping Bag
              > Owner Review
              > July 8, 2008
              >
              > Reviewer Information
              > Name: Sophie Pearson
              > Age: 26
              > Gender: Female
              > Height: 5' 8" (1.71 m)
              > Weight: 179 lb (81 kg)
              > Sleeping bag length: Long
              > Email address: sophiep3 at gmail dot com
              > Location: Tampa, Florida USA
              >
              > Backpacking Background
              > I first started backpacking as a teenager in England. I did a
              > month-long trip in the Arctic but most of my backpacking experience
              > has been weekend to 10-day trips, in a range of terrains and
              climates.
              > I am a volcanologist so also do day hikes carrying loaded packs over
              > intense terrain. Nowadays I am nearly always in sub-tropical or
              > tropical climates. I am heading more and more towards ultralight
              > packing, and unless I am sharing I use a bivy rather than a tent. I
              > try to pack under 20 lb (9 kg) for long weekend trips but have
              carried
              > over 50 lb (23 kg).
              >
              > Product Information bag
              > Manufacturer: Kelty
              > Year of manufacture: 2006
              > URL: www.kelty.com
              > MSRP: $190
              > The bag they now make is specified to a lower temperature and has
              > slightly different dimensions but the design is identical.
              >
              > Manufacturer My bag
              > Minimum temperature 20 F (-7 C) 25 F (-4 C)
              > Length 80 in (2.03 m) 79 in (2.00 m)
              > Width at shoulder 59 in (1.50 m) 50 in (1.27 m)
              > Width at foot 13 in (0.33 m)
              > Weight 2 lb 9 oz (1.20 kg) 2lb 1 oz (0.94 kg)
              > Weight in stuff sack 2 lb 2 oz (0.96 kg)
              > Stuff sack diameter 7 in (0.18 m) 7 in (0.18 m)
              > Stuff sack length 14 in (0.36 m) 14 in (0.36 m)
              > Storage bag diameter 12.5 in (0.32 m)
              > Storage bag height 20 in (0.51 m)
              >
              > Product Description
              > The Kelty Women's Light Year is a 3 season down sleeping bag
              designed
              > specifically for women. It has 650-fill goose down, with extra
              padding
              > at the feet and torso, and a synthetic polyester shell. It has
              > slant-baffle construction and ground-level side seams to minimize
              heat
              > loss. The outside top is light blue (the newer ones are yellow) and
              > the bottom and inside are grey. The bag is mummy style and has 2
              > pull-cords around the head opening. The one across the front of the
              > bag is yellow and black string, the one around the top of the hood
              is
              > a 0.25 in (0.65 cm) wide flat black ribbon cord. They both go
              through
              > the same cordlock but can be pulled separately. The cordlock is
              > attached to a loop on the outside of the bag about 2 in (5cm) from
              the
              > opening. The opening zip is on the right side from the inside and
              > reaches half-way down, to about level with the hips. It is backed
              by a
              > grey and white patterned fabric zipper guard. There is a hook and
              loop
              > fastener across the top of the zip to secure the bag shut. The
              zippers
              > have the yellow and black string attached to them to make them
              easier
              > to pull. There is also a zip running along the bottom of the bag.
              > There are 2 loops on the outside of the bag near the head and 2 near
              > the feet made from the outer fabric of the bag. There are also 2 on
              > the inside attached to the liner. On either side of the foot zip are
              > similar but larger loops to hang the bag. There are also 4 loops
              made
              > of grey ribbon cord about 1/3 and 2/3 down the sides of the bag. The
              > bag comes with a large orange cotton bag for storage, and a much
              > smaller black stuff sack for packing.
              >
              > Field Information
              > I first got this bag for a 10-day trip to Yellowstone and the Grand
              > Tetons in summer 2006. The temperatures averaged around 45 F (7 C)
              at
              > night but dropped to about 30 F (-1 C) when we hiked up to higher
              > elevation, where there was snow on the ground. I have also taken it
              on
              > numerous trips around Florida, backpacking and car camping, where
              > temperatures have reached 90 F (32 C) and rarely drop below 50 F (10
              > C). I used the bag during a four-day trip to Georgia in the fall,
              > where it was consistently damp and drizzly and temperatures were
              > around 45 F (7 C) at night. I have used it in my 2-person
              backpacking
              > tent on my own and sharing, and in my bivy bag.
              >
              > Review
              > stuffed The first thing I noticed about this bag is how light it is.
              > Compared to my synthetic, 4+ season bag the difference is
              incredible.
              > It also packs really small, without having to fight with the stuff
              > sack or use compression straps. I like the fact that it came in a
              > large bag for storage too, so that the down doesn't lose its
              fluffiness.
              >
              > The bag is rated for 3 seasons, down to 25 F (-4 C). I have used it
              in
              > temperatures from 90 F (32 C) to about 30 F (-1 C). With my feet
              > sticking out of the zip at the end I have not found it too hot, even
              > in Florida in the summer. I have however had some problems with
              > getting cold. Because it is designed for women, there is extra
              padding
              > at the feet and this really has made a difference. The problem for
              me
              > is my bottom - I tend to sleep on my side and my bottom ends up
              > touching the bag near the bottom of the zip and has got so cold it
              has
              > gone numb in the past! This happened one night in the Grand Tetons,
              > when I was sharing a tent and temperatures got down to 30 F (-1 C),
              > and a couple of times when I have been sleeping on my own in my
              > 2-person backpacking tent in Floridian winter, at temperatures of
              > around 40 F (4 C). I haven't noticed it when I am sleeping in my
              bivy
              > bag. I don't know if this is a problem with the sleeping bag, or a
              > peculiarity of mine, but I have not found it with other bags, and I
              > have plenty of padding in that area! For me it's an acceptable
              > trade-off because my feet have always got really cold really quickly
              > until I bought this bag, and I find it easier to warm up my bottom
              > than my feet.
              >
              > I'm not sure how much difference the half-zip makes in weight but it
              > actually suits me really well because I have a habit of catching
              zips
              > and there is less zip to catch, plus less draft tube that can let
              air
              > in. I don't use a mummy style sleeping bag as a quilt because of the
              > footbox, so the half zip is not a problem there. The bag has
              > ground-level seams and slant-baffle construction that are supposed
              to
              > increase heat retention, but I can't really tell if they help.
              >
              > I initially thought that the number of loops was a bit over-kill,
              but
              > I found I have used them more than I realized. I initially used the
              > loops 1/3 and 2/3 of the way down to strap my bag to my pad, until I
              > realized that the shell of the bag is much less slippery than my old
              > one and doesn't need it. The foot loops are great for hanging up the
              > bag to air when I get back from a trip. Kelty says that some of the
              > loops are designed to allow the bag to be used as a liner, but I
              > haven't tested that. One complaint I have is that the hood cordlock
              is
              > attached to an outside loop and I have not found a way to pull the
              > hood tight without my hand sticking out. This is a bit awkward, and
              > leaves a gap where cold can get in.
              >
              > The bag is really soft and feels fairly padded. Over the 2 years I
              > have had it the down does not seem to have lost much loft. The shell
              > of the bag rustles much less than my old synthetic bag, which I
              really
              > like because I tend to be the last to bed and move around a lot in
              my
              > sleep. I initially worried about getting a down bag because of how
              > long it takes to dry off and become usable again if it gets wet. I
              > have kept the bag in the stuff sack in a plastic bag whenever I am
              > outside, and have not noticed any moisture issues even in damp,
              > drizzly fog. I (reluctantly because of the moisture issue) took the
              > bag on a 3 day kayaking trip but the dry bag did its job perfectly.
              I
              > have therefore not tested the performance when wet yet (and
              hopefully
              > never will!) but my tent has ended up with quite a lot of moisture
              in
              > it during rain storms and the moisture-wicking synthetic shell seems
              > to have kept all of the damp out of the down.
              >
              > Summary
              > The Kelty Women's Light Year Down sleeping bag is a small,
              > light-weight 3 season sleeping bag that appears to have suffered
              > little from 2 years of use and many outings. The right-opening
              > half-zip has kept weight down and warmth in while a foot zip has
              kept
              > me cool in hotter weather. Extra padding at the foot and torso
              really
              > keeps me warm, although when the temperatures drop below 40 F (4 C)
              my
              > bottom sometimes gets cold. My only other complaint is that the hood
              > cordlock is on the outside which means that the tightest the hood
              can
              > be pulled is with a hand sticking out. Overall a really nice
              > backpacking sleeping bag, but not quite warm enough for me at the
              > lower end of the rated temperature range.
              >
              > Pros:
              > Light
              > Packs small
              > Half-zip
              > Foot zip for ventilation
              >
              > Cons:
              > My bottom gets cold in this bag at low temperatures
              > Cannot pull the hood as tight as I would like
              >
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