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REPOST: OWNER REVIEW: MSR Missing Link tent (Johanna Turner)

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  • Johanna
    MSR Missing Link Tent Name: Johanna Turner Age: 33 Gender: Female Height: 5 8 Weight: 125lbs Email address: immunity_idol@yahoo.com City, State, Country: Los
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 10, 2007
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      MSR Missing Link Tent

      Name: Johanna Turner
      Age: 33
      Gender: Female
      Height: 5'8"
      Weight: 125lbs
      Email address: immunity_idol@...
      City, State, Country: Los Angeles, California, USA

      Date: December 10, 2007

      Backpacking Background: I have been hiking and backpacking since college. I have
      recently gotten into canyoneering. I typically hike 8-12 miles (13-19 km) on a day hike
      every weekend, and often once or twice during the week. I plan several backpacking trips
      during the summer, which are generally two to five days in length. I also car camp many
      times during the whole year. I consider myself an ultralight backpacker. My total pack
      weight, including food, for 3 days is around 20 pounds (9 kg). The only terrain I don't hike
      in is snow.

      Manufacturer: Mountain Safety Research (MSR)
      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      Manufacturer URL: http://www.msrcorp.com/
      Listed Weight: Minimum Weight: 3 lbs (1.36 kg)
      Packaged Weight: 3lbs 7oz (1.56 kg)
      *weight does not include trekking poles
      Weight as delivered: Tent with stuff sack: 2lb 15 oz (1.3kg)
      Stakes in stuff sack: 3.2 oz (91 grams)
      Total weight as delivered: 3 lb, 2.2oz (1.42 kg)
      Product Description: The MSR Missing Link is a two person, three season, single wall tent.
      It is made of bright orange silicon coated ripstop nylon. It comes in a matching orange
      stuff sack, with six small aluminum stakes. Trekking poles are typically used as the main
      support, though any pole of the right length (or even sticks) can be used. I had some
      carbon fiber poles made, since I don't use trekking poles. There is one door, and a large
      awning. A strip of mesh runs along the top front and bottom rear of the tent. The door has
      a mesh layer as well as a waterproof layer, which can be zipped or unzipped.

      Field information: I have used this tent in many different locations, mostly in forest and
      mountain areas of Southern California, in spring, summer, and fall, over a period of two
      and a half years. These include:

      Sequoia National Forest (open, flat, soft dirt terrain, with daytime temps averaging 75
      degrees Fahrenheit (24 Celsius) for a high, and 40 degrees (4.4 Celsius) for the low).

      Goddard Canyon, in Kings Canyon National Park (open, rocky terrain with winds of 10 to
      30 mph (16 to 48 kph and temps averaging 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18 degrees Celsius)
      for a high, and 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-6.5 degrees Celsius) for the low).

      Joshua Tree National Park (sharp gravel terrain with some light drizzle overnight, temps
      averaging 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 Celsius) for a high, and 40 degrees (4.4 Celsius) for
      the low).

      My first experience pitching the tent, which was in Sequoia National Forest, revealed a few
      things. The Missing Link saves weight by eliminating poles. This means it must be staked
      out carefully and securely. It didn't take more than 5 minutes to get the tent up, but I
      needed to adjust the stakes and tie line lengths quite a bit to get the tent nice and tight.
      The instructions printed on the stuff sack were detailed and helpful. The aluminum stakes
      are thin and small. They are easy to push into soft soil. If I placed a stake at one end, then
      pulled on the tent to place a stake at the opposite end, I could pull the first stake right out
      and have to start over. I have since worked out the science of it, and it now goes up
      quickly. I usually find some good sized rocks to put on top of the stakes to keep them
      secure. The length of the guy lines makes for a real tripping hazard, even with the
      reflective cordage MSR provided. After a few near face plants, I decided to simply stay
      away from the sides of the tent altogether. I also needed a large area to set up, since the
      guy lines extend so far out.

      I found that although the six stakes provided are enough to pitch the tent, eight stakes
      would be ideal. I used some small sticks instead – one to prop up the back flap, and
      improve airflow, and another to stake out a rear guyline that pulls the back of the tent out,
      creating more room inside.

      The tent is very roomy inside. At 5'8" (172 cm), I have about a foot of usable room at both
      my head and feet, where I can store shoes, my pack, or other items. The floor has a
      trapezoid shape, so a second person would have less room. The floor length at the back
      of the tent, near the door, is 11 ft (3.35 m) The floor length at the front of the tent is 6 ft
      (1.83 m). The mesh door is large, and zips all the way down to the floor, giving a nice airy
      feeling with a good view. Since there was no threat of rain, I didn't stake out the awning,
      but instead folded it back over the top of the tent. This way, I didn't need to duck under it
      to get in or out of the tent. I can also sit up with plenty of headroom, and imagined easily
      sitting there playing cards with someone and being very comfortable. Changing clothes
      inside is not a colossal struggle involving contortionist moves. There were a few
      mosquitoes, and none got through the mesh to bother me inside.

      The humidity on this trip was low, and with no rain, I didn't have to zip up the waterproof
      nylon part of the door. Probably because of these two factors, I didn't get any
      condensation inside. In the morning, I was in direct sun, and it quickly got too warm to be
      comfortable.

      Packing up was simple and fast. The Missing Link rolls right up to a nice compact size –
      larger than a Nalgene bottle, but smaller than a typical sleeping bag in a stuff sack.

      California weather is so great, I've never been able to rigorously test the waterproofness of
      my Missing Link in the field. It's an important part of any tent, so I set it up in the
      backyard one day during a heavy winter rainstorm, and left it out there overnight. We got
      about two inches (5 cm) of rain that day and night, and in the morning there were a few
      drops of water in the corners of the tent, on the floor. I didn't do any seam sealing on my
      own, so this was a test of how it performs straight from the factory. The tent had gotten a
      little saggy from the constant pounding. They guy lines had stretched, as had the fabric of
      the tent.

      I have had this tent in windy conditions with 30mph (48 kph) gusts, and it did fall over on
      me a couple of times, until I found some nice heavy rocks to keep those little stakes in the
      ground where they belong. Then the tent was tight enough that there wasn't a lot of
      annoying flapping noise either. In windy conditions, it also helps to orient the sloped back
      side of the tent toward the wind, rather than the flat front.

      Summary: The MSR Missing Link is a comfortable, reliable tent for three season
      backpacking. The extra care and finesse it takes to pitch it is an easy trade off for the
      roominess and light weight. The thin fabric is surprisingly strong, and has survived several
      trips on abrasive decomposed granite, sharp pine needles, and lots of tension on the
      guylines, with no noticeable wear and tear. I like the design of this tent, and would
      recommend it to backpackers who don't mind taking a few extra minutes of setup.
    • rayestrella1
      Hi Johanna, All right, looking good. I have a few more edits after which you can repost here; You can also put a HTML copy in the Owner Review Test Folder. It
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 10, 2007
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        Hi Johanna,

        All right, looking good. I have a few more edits after which you can
        repost here; You can also put a HTML copy in the Owner Review Test
        Folder. It is found at the end of the list of reviews on the main
        page or here;

        http://tinyurl.com/4mfwa

        The free BGT Report Writer for HTML creation may be found here;

        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=RR&page=1

        If you require assistance with your upload, please ask in our Yahoo!
        support group,

        BGTFileUploadHelp @

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTFileUploadHelp/?yguid=209560176


        Please let me have a link to the review or at least the name once you
        have it uploaded.

        Ray



        ***Weight: 125lbs

        EDIT: needs a space at the number 125 lb and a metric conversion.
        (All weights, measurements and distances need conversions)



        ***Weight as delivered: Tent with stuff sack: 2lb 15 oz (1.3kg)

        EDIT: need a space at 1.3 kg



        ***Total weight as delivered: 3 lb, 2.2oz (1.42 kg)

        EDIT: need a space at 2.2 oz



        ***Sequoia National Forest (open, flat, soft dirt terrain, with
        daytime temps averaging 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 Celsius) for a
        high, and 40 degrees (4.4 Celsius) for the low).

        EDIT: you have three set of parenthesis in the same group. Maybe;
        Sequoia National Forest which has open, flat, soft dirt terrain, with
        daytime temps averaging 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 Celsius) for a
        high, and 40 degrees (4 Celsius) for the low.

        And the Celsius should be rounded up or down like I did in the
        example. Same things with the other locations please.



        ***and another to stake out a rear guyline that pulls the back of the
        tent out,

        EDIT: all your other spellings are "guy line" which is correct. This
        one should match.



        ***The floor length at the back of the tent, near the door, is 11 ft
        (3.35 m) The floor length at the front of the tent is 6 ft (1.83 m).

        EDIT: you need a period after (3.35 m)



        ***I have had this tent in windy conditions with 30mph (48 kph)
        gusts,

        EDIT: need a space at 30 mph



        *** has survived several trips on abrasive decomposed granite, sharp
        pine needles, and lots of tension on the guylines, with no
        noticeable wear and tear.

        EDIT: guy lines
      • Johanna
        Hi Ray. Thanks for your help in editing. Here is my upload: http://tinyurl.com/34fxv8 Let me know what you think. It s my first one, obviously, so it s
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 23, 2007
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          Hi Ray. Thanks for your help in editing. Here is my upload:

          http://tinyurl.com/34fxv8

          Let me know what you think. It's my first one, obviously, so it's nothing too fancy. Still, I
          think it looks pretty good.

          -Johanna

          --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "rayestrella1" <rayestrella@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Johanna,
          >
          > All right, looking good. I have a few more edits after which you can
          > repost here; You can also put a HTML copy in the Owner Review Test
          > Folder. It is found at the end of the list of reviews on the main
          > page or here;
          >
          > http://tinyurl.com/4mfwa
          > Please let me have a link to the review or at least the name once you
          > have it uploaded.
          >
          > Ray
        • Jamie D.
          Hi Johanna, The uploaded version looks nice. I like the layout. Unfortunately, your MSR link is not correct, at least I don t think so. It s sent me to
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 23, 2007
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            Hi Johanna,

            The uploaded version looks nice. I like the layout. Unfortunately,
            your MSR link is not correct, at least I don't think so. It's sent
            me to Modern Systems Research Inc., I don't they sell ourdoor
            gear. :)

            Merry Christmas!
            Jamie D

            --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Johanna"
            <immunity_idol@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Ray. Thanks for your help in editing. Here is my upload:
            >
            > http://tinyurl.com/34fxv8
            >
            > Let me know what you think. It's my first one, obviously, so it's
            nothing too fancy. Still, I
            > think it looks pretty good.
            >
            > -Johanna
          • Johanna
            Whoops - thanks for catching that Jamie! Merry Christmas to you & your family. -Johanna
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 23, 2007
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              Whoops - thanks for catching that Jamie! Merry Christmas to you & your family.

              -Johanna

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Jamie D." <jdeben@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Johanna,
              >
              > The uploaded version looks nice. I like the layout. Unfortunately,
              > your MSR link is not correct, at least I don't think so. It's sent
              > me to Modern Systems Research Inc., I don't they sell ourdoor
              > gear. :)
              >
              > Merry Christmas!
              > Jamie D
              >
            • Johanna
              Here is the link with the corrected MSR web address. Sorry for the multiple postings on this! http://tinyurl.com/2g4hj3
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 23, 2007
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                Here is the link with the corrected MSR web address. Sorry for the multiple postings on this!

                http://tinyurl.com/2g4hj3
              • Jamie D.
                Hi Johanna, Thanks for the Christmas cheer. I hope your day was a wonderful one. As for your new link, the words are correct, but it is still sending the
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 30, 2007
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                  Hi Johanna,

                  Thanks for the Christmas cheer. I hope your day was a wonderful one.
                  As for your new link, the words are correct, but it is still sending
                  the clicker to the other "non-msr corp" site. Take another look.

                  Jamie

                  --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Johanna" <immunity_idol@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Here is the link with the corrected MSR web address. Sorry for the
                  multiple postings on this!
                  >
                  > http://tinyurl.com/2g4hj3
                  >
                • rayestrella1
                  Hi Johanna, Your review looks good. I see two problems. Once they are fixed post a new HTML to the Owner Reviews test folder (not the Tests test folder) so
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 3, 2008
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                    Hi Johanna,

                    Your review looks good. I see two problems. Once they are fixed post a
                    new HTML to the "Owner Reviews" test folder (not the "Tests" test
                    folder) so I can check the link. Let me know here once it is up.

                    Ray


                    EDIT: your manufacturer link does not go to msrcorp.com like it should.

                    ***The tent is very roomy inside. At 5'8" (172 cm), I have about a foot
                    of usable room at both my head and feet

                    EDIT: you need a metric conversion number for the "foot" also
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