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OWNER REVIEW - (Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo)

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  • Jeremy Drobnick
    Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo Reviewer Information Name: Jeremy Drobnick Age: 30 Gender: Male Height: 6 0 (1.83 Meters) Weight: 190 Pounds (86.36
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 28, 2006
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      Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo

      Reviewer Information

      Name: Jeremy Drobnick
      Age: 30
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6' 0" (1.83 Meters)
      Weight: 190 Pounds (86.36 Kilograms)
      Email address: jeremy.drobnick@...
      City, State, Country: Charlotte, North Carolina, US
      Date: November 28, 2006
      Backpacking Background: I started backpacking eight years ago. What initially started as frequent, relaxed weekend trips has evolved into more aggressive backpacking in increasingly harsh weather conditions, trails, and duration. I love winter camping; the more snow and ice, the better. I am gaining a growing appreciation for lightweight backpacking, but am not afraid to pack on additional weight for extended and/or winter trips. The equipment I use has to be tough; I will treat it well, but expect it to perform to high standards. I usually hike between 50 and 300 miles each year.

      Product Information

      (Note: Purchased from Campmor. Since the Wenzel site does not have specs on this tent, the product information provided below is according to Campmor)

      Manufacturer: Wenzel
      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      Manufacturer URL: http://www.wenzelco.com/
      Listed Weight: 4 lbs. 8 oz. (pkg wgt); 3 lbs. 8 oz. (min wgt)
      Weight as Delivered: 4 lbs min
      Tent Capacity: 1-2
      Tent Dimensions: 4 ft. X 6 ft. 10 in.
      Tent Area: (Sq. Ft.) 25
      Internal Height Front: 3 ft., Rear 2 ft.
      Pack Size: 6 in. X 19 in.
      No. of Poles: 3
      Pole Size / Material: 9.5mm, fiberglass
      No. of Doors: 1
      Hooded Fly: Yes
      No. of Windows: 2
      Floor Material: 1.9 oz. Nylon Taffeta with 600mm Coating
      Wall Material: UV Armor 1.9 oz. polyester 600mm Coating
      Roof Material: UV Armor- 1.9 oz. Polyester with 600mm Coating
      Netting: 40 Denier No-see-um
      Color: Silver Grey Roof/Walls, Black Floor
      Style: Single Wall, Frame Bivy
      Use: 3 season
      MSRP: $30



      Field Information

      As I have “evolved” in my approach to backpacking, I have sought lighter and smaller items to replace my traditionally heavy/bulky items from the days of shorter hikes, and general apathy about the amount of weight on my back. The Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo (hereafter referred to as Wenzel, StarLite or tent) tent was one purchase made as I began to consider this better way of backpacking. I bought the Wenzel in summer of 2005 for three reasons: relatively lightweight, small pack size, and economics.

      When I personally need to make a purchase, I generally approach an unfamiliar arena by seeing what I can get for the least amount of money. Sometimes that approach is beneficial and sometimes it isn’t. Having only owned one tent prior to this one (also a Wenzel tent) and having no problems with it (note: all previous experience was fair-weather camping), I was plenty content to avoid more expensive brand names and see what I could get for $30.

      Sometimes I am destined to learn things the hard way. That would be the case on my StarLite.

      Upon receiving the tent from Campmor, I was disappointed to find that it appeared to be a good deal smaller than anticipated. I went back to the website to double check what I saw. First, the information provided above comes from the product specs table – traditionally on the right side of the page. This is what I had used to make my decision. This data appears to be supported by the graphic of the floor plan – 6’ 10” x 4’. However, in the information bullet points (on the left side of the same page), there is a specific piece of information that bears attention: Floor size tapers from 4 ft. in the front to 3 ft. 1 in. at the rear. The rear of the tent is just 3 feet wide and 2 feet tall!

      As I looked at the tent set up in my living room, I felt somewhat dismayed. Anyone who might have considered using the 1-2 person capacity for 2 persons – including me – would be at a dreadful loss. This tent was absolutely not suitable for anymore than one 6-foot person. I pondered the return-to-Campmor option, but since I had actually paid less than the MSRP during a sale, I rationalized that perhaps I couldn’t expect anything more than what I received. Into the closet it went to wait for a solo trip.

      Seven months passed and in January 2006 the first opportunity arose to make use of my StarLite. I headed to the Smoky Mountains (NP) on a winter trip. The forecast in Bryson City, NC was 30% chance of showers and mid-30s. I planned to head to Gregory Bald – roughly 4000ft higher in elevation (5000ft) – where I had a good chance of snow. While this tent was clearly not a winter tent with its fiberglass poles, I figured a few inches of snow would be no problem (considering the short length of the poles).

      Upon arrival at the bald the wind was blowing hard, it was near freezing and nearing dusk, but there wasn’t a cloud in the sky. So much for the chance of precipitation – or so I thought. The tent setup was fairly easy – four stakes, three poles and four guy ropes. The wind had little impact on the tent with the low profile.

      All was well until 10pm that night when I woke to the sound of steadily falling rain. The temperature remained just above freezing and a very, very cold cloud cover engulfed the mountain. As I listened, I heard an echo-drip to the raindrops on the tent. I flipped on my flashlight to investigate. To my utter horror, I watched tiny droplets of water soaking through the seam down the center ridge of the tent above me, and falling onto my sleeping bag. I looked around further and found to my amazement and disgust that each and every single seam on the entire tent was absorbing rain and spewing a fountain of water into the tent.

      Additionally, as the weight of the rain bore down on the tent, the center of the tent sank down and matted against my sleeping bag like a wet blanket. The two guy ropes on the side of the tent did little more than contribute to this sagging process. Upon trying to stabilize the tent several hours later, the upper front fabric pocket (for the poles) ripped and I was left with further leakage and sagging.

      The whole experience was quite illuminating, and while it gave me the opportunity to test the waterproof-ness of many articles of my camping equipment (more stories for another time), it qualified hands-down as the single most miserable camping/backpacking experience of my life. Needless to say I have a new appreciation for the value of a quality-made tent. At least in the category of tents, I have revised my economic approach. Money may not be able to buy happiness, but spending some extra cash can certainly buy a dry patch of fabric and avoid the fallout of a saturating experience on an unexpectedly rainy January weekend in the Smokies.

      Postscript: In an effort to validate whether or not the seams simply needed to be sealed, I decided to submit myself to another potential round of torture. I purchased and applied liberal coats of seam sealer – 3 external coats and 2 internal coats to be exact – to every seam on the tent. Four weeks later, I went back to the Smokies with my father and faced another weekend of winter weather. He, too, had purchased the same model tent (before my previously-described experience) and now sealed the seams on his tent. Once again, the results were terrible. While the leaking was less (maybe just because it rained less), everything in my tent was thoroughly soaked. My father’s tent performed slightly better (better sealed or inconsistent results from the factory?) but still let an unacceptable amount of water into the tent.

      Post-postscript: For those of you who are new to backpacking and find yourselves impressed with all the fancy names (i.e. 1.9 oz. Nylon Taffeta with 600mm Coating) for tent fabrics, consider this fair warning. Not all tents are created equal. And features such as factory taped seams and bathtub floors are critical in wet weather. While more expensive tents may also leak, my experience with this tent is that it arguably keeps out about as much water as a sieve.



      Summary

      Based upon my experience, the Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo is unacceptable for inclement weather and is truly a solo tent, rather than the 1-2 capacity listed on a popular reseller’s website.

      Pros –

      Relatively lightweight
      Small pack profile
      Economic savings
      Possibly a good choice in drier climates
      Cons –

      Not for inclement weather or situations where there is a chance of inclement weather
      Materials (i.e. seams, fabrics) are not suitable for any moderately rough treatment; this is a fair-weather, light-treatment shelter
      Floor size tapers
      Middle of tent sags; guy ropes do not help (even in fair weather)
      Getting in and out of tent is difficult due to front guy rope
      Rear “window” of tent is a triangle about 3” height x 4” width
      Not freestanding
      No bathtub floor
      No factory-taped seams
      Somewhat claustrophobic without more window coverage (only about 2sq ft of window)
      Single-wall design



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    • chcoa
      PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 2006
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        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner
        Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. Do
        not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our
        Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an
        official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response
        from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this
        timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben@....

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask
        that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our
        experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved
        and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.
        This way we can work with you on addressing any standard BGT policy
        edits which you can incorporate into your second and subsequent
        reviews before submission.

        If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community!
        The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints,
        to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely
        manner. Once these first two Owner Reviews have been approved and
        you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to
        start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance
        with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to
        Jennifer P, the mentor coordinator, at (jennifer.pope@...).

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group.
        These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered
        carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your
        review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
        will usually result in a better review, as well as making things
        easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject
        line of your re-submitted review, if you take this route or make any
        changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit
        Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups
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        If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR, the entire
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        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Edit Administration Manager
      • edwardripleyduggan
        Dear Jeremy, Please don t misunderstand--BGT has no problem with negative reviews. Despite the various edits, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this. However, the
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 7, 2006
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          Dear Jeremy,

          Please don't misunderstand--BGT has no problem with negative reviews.
          Despite the various edits, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this.
          However, the problem I see here is that your use constitutes one trip
          in one example of the tent, predictably disastrous because unsealed,
          and another trip in a sealed version. Even counting this as two uses,
          this is really under our usage criteria. It hardly seems fair to
          subject you to a third round of torture!

          With the second trip, it's unclear to me if the leakage was again
          along the seams, or elsewhere. Or was it an unacceptably high level of
          condensation? In any case, in addition to the usage criteria, you
          don't have anything on ease and method of setup, and much other
          information that is standard in a tent review.

          I will consult first with my editorial colleagues, but I feel it
          likely, with some regret, that we must reject this review on the usage
          criterion. I will get back to you on this, but I'm virtually certain
          that this will be the consensus.

          At the same time, I do think you write amusingly, and I would love to
          see you as part of the BGT team. I'd like to suggest that, working
          with a mentor, you submit an OR for another piece of gear. It doesn't
          have to work well, but it should have more than two uses in the field.
          To get assigned a mentor, contact Jennifer Pope

          jennifer.pope@...

          our esteemed head of the mentor program. I don't think it will take
          much to get you on track. Please do go over my edits, and (if you have
          not done so) take a look at

          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=BecomeTester&page=1

          Best,

          Ted

          BGT OR EDITOR



          >
          > Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo

          ### EDIT:

          Heading should be



          Owner Review
          Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo
          Date: November 28, 2006


          >
          > Reviewer Information
          >
          > Name: Jeremy Drobnick
          > Age: 30
          > Gender: Male
          > Height: 6' 0" (1.83 Meters)
          > Weight: 190 Pounds (86.36 Kilograms)

          ### EDIT: since you use abbreviations elsewhere (as we prefer) please
          use them above, e.g.
          Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
          Weight: 190 lbs (86.36 kg)



          > Email address: jeremy.drobnick@...
          > City, State, Country: Charlotte, North Carolina, US
          > Date: November 28, 2006

          ### EDIT: Date may now be removed from here

          > Backpacking Background: I started backpacking eight years ago.
          What initially started as frequent, relaxed weekend trips has evolved
          into more aggressive backpacking in increasingly harsh weather
          conditions, trails, and duration. I love winter camping; the more
          snow and ice, the better. I am gaining a growing appreciation for
          lightweight backpacking, but am not afraid to pack on additional
          weight for extended and/or winter trips. The equipment I use has to
          be tough; I will treat it well, but expect it to perform to high
          standards. I usually hike between 50 and 300 miles each year.

          ### EDIT: If you could list your packweight, before consumables, this
          would be helpful for readers (please put in both lb and kg). Also, "50
          and 300 miles" needs to have a conversion after it: (80 to 480 km)

          >
          > Product Information
          >
          > (Note: Purchased from Campmor. Since the Wenzel site does not
          have specs on this tent, the product information provided below is
          according to Campmor)

          ### EDIT: This is a problem. I would prefer that you omit all the data
          except that which you have measures, unless you can get confirmation
          from Wenzel or by measurement. In other words, omit listed weight,
          tent dimensions, tent area, internal height and pack size. All of
          these, BTW, would need metric conversions. The only exception would be
          the fabric specs. There should be no mention of a retailer, be it REI,
          Campmor or whatever, in the review.


          >
          > Manufacturer: Wenzel
          > Year of Manufacture: 2005
          > Manufacturer URL: http://www.wenzelco.com/
          > Listed Weight: 4 lbs. 8 oz. (pkg wgt); 3 lbs. 8 oz. (min wgt)
          > Weight as Delivered: 4 lbs min

          ### EDIT: Please provide a metric equivalent in kg. Also, specify what
          you mean by "min" in this case. What's included in this weight?

          > Tent Capacity: 1-2
          > Tent Dimensions: 4 ft. X 6 ft. 10 in.
          > Tent Area: (Sq. Ft.) 25
          > Internal Height Front: 3 ft., Rear 2 ft.
          > Pack Size: 6 in. X 19 in.
          > No. of Poles: 3
          > Pole Size / Material: 9.5mm, fiberglass
          > No. of Doors: 1
          > Hooded Fly: Yes
          > No. of Windows: 2
          > Floor Material: 1.9 oz. Nylon Taffeta with 600mm Coating
          > Wall Material: UV Armor 1.9 oz. polyester 600mm Coating
          > Roof Material: UV Armor- 1.9 oz. Polyester with 600mm Coating
          > Netting: 40 Denier No-see-um
          > Color: Silver Grey Roof/Walls, Black Floor
          > Style: Single Wall, Frame Bivy

          ### EDIT: small point, but the words don't have to be capitalized in
          this manner. The first in each line, maybe.


          > Use: 3 season
          > MSRP: $30

          ### EDIT: MSRP: US$30

          >
          >
          >
          > Field Information
          >
          > As I have "evolved" in my approach to backpacking, I have sought
          lighter and smaller items to replace my traditionally heavy/bulky
          items from the days of shorter hikes, and general apathy about the
          amount of weight on my back.

          ### EDIT: I'd drop the "and general apathy about the amount of weight
          on my back." Alternatively, put that thought as a separate sentence.

          The Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight Solo (hereafter referred to as
          Wenzel, StarLite or tent) tent was one purchase made as I began to
          consider this better way of backpacking. I bought the Wenzel in
          summer of 2005 for three reasons: relatively lightweight, small pack
          size, and economics.
          >
          > When I personally need to make a purchase, I generally approach an
          unfamiliar arena by seeing what I can get for the least amount of
          money. Sometimes that approach is beneficial and sometimes it isn't.
          Having only owned one tent prior to this one (also a Wenzel tent) and
          having no problems with it (note: all previous experience was
          fair-weather camping), I was plenty content to avoid more expensive
          brand names and see what I could get for $30.
          >
          > Sometimes I am destined to learn things the hard way. That would
          be the case on my StarLite.
          >
          > Upon receiving the tent from Campmor,

          ### EDIT: drop "from Campmor."

          I was disappointed to find that it appeared to be a good deal smaller
          than anticipated. I went back to the website to double check what I
          saw. First, the information provided above comes from the product
          specs table – traditionally on the right side of the page. This is
          what I had used to make my decision. This data appears to be
          supported by the graphic of the floor plan – 6' 10" x 4'. However, in
          the information bullet points (on the left side of the same page),
          there is a specific piece of information that bears attention: Floor
          size tapers from 4 ft. in the front to 3 ft. 1 in. at the rear. The
          rear of the tent is just 3 feet wide and 2 feet tall!

          ### EDIT: Because of the exclusion of the Campmor data, the paragraph
          above is going to have to refer to your own measurements. Sorry about
          this.

          >
          > As I looked at the tent set up in my living room, I felt somewhat
          dismayed. Anyone who might have considered using the 1-2 person
          capacity for 2 persons – including me – would be at a dreadful loss.
          This tent was absolutely not suitable for anymore than one 6-foot
          person. I pondered the return-to-Campmor option,

          ### EDIT: returning it to the retailer,

          but since I had actually paid less than the MSRP during a sale, I
          rationalized that perhaps I couldn't expect anything more than what I
          received. Into the closet it went to wait for a solo trip.
          >
          > Seven months passed and in January 2006 the first opportunity
          arose to make use of my StarLite. I headed to the Smoky Mountains
          (NP) on a winter trip. The forecast in Bryson City, NC was 30% chance
          of showers and mid-30s. I planned to head to Gregory Bald – roughly
          4000ft higher in elevation (5000ft)

          ### EDIT: metric equivalents, please. Space between measurement and
          unit. Also temperature needs to be stated as "mid-30s F (around -1 C)"
          F and C DO get capitalized because the units are based on names.

          – where I had a good chance of snow. While this tent was clearly not
          a winter tent with its fiberglass poles, I figured a few inches of
          snow would be no problem (considering the short length of the poles).
          >
          > Upon arrival at the bald the wind was blowing hard, it was near
          freezing and nearing dusk, but there wasn't a cloud in the sky. So
          much for the chance of precipitation – or so I thought. The tent
          setup was fairly easy – four stakes, three poles and four guy ropes.
          The wind had little impact on the tent with the low profile.
          >
          > All was well until 10pm that night when I woke to the sound of
          steadily falling rain. The temperature remained just above freezing
          and a very, very cold cloud cover engulfed the mountain. As I
          listened, I heard an echo-drip to the raindrops on the tent. I
          flipped on my flashlight to investigate. To my utter horror, I
          watched tiny droplets of water soaking through the seam down the
          center ridge of the tent above me, and falling onto my sleeping bag.
          I looked around further and found to my amazement and disgust that
          each and every single seam on the entire tent was absorbing rain and
          spewing a fountain of water into the tent.

          ### EDIT: A comment here. Most tents (including some that are
          expensive) need seam-sealing. This is pretty standard procedure. I
          would not have expected a tent in this price range to be seam-sealed,
          nor would I assume any tent to be seam sealed unless explicitly
          stated. Though somewhere, in the recesses of a closet, I own one that
          I use for car camping with my kids, I am no fan of Wenzel tents.
          However, it's unreasonable to expect that an unsealed tent would not leak.

          >
          > Additionally, as the weight of the rain bore down on the tent, the
          center of the tent sank down and matted against my sleeping bag like a
          wet blanket. The two guy ropes on the side of the tent did little
          more than contribute to this sagging process. Upon trying to
          stabilize the tent several hours later, the upper front fabric pocket
          (for the poles) ripped and I was left with further leakage and sagging.

          ### EDIT: This seems to be fair criticism. It sounds like the fabric
          saturated, and that is a valid issue.
          >
          > The whole experience was quite illuminating, and while it gave me
          the opportunity to test the waterproof-ness of many articles of my
          camping equipment (more stories for another time), it qualified
          hands-down as the single most miserable camping/backpacking experience
          of my life.

          ### COMMENT: I bet!

          Needless to say I have a new appreciation for the value of a
          quality-made tent. At least in the category of tents, I have revised
          my economic approach. Money may not be able to buy happiness, but
          spending some extra cash can certainly buy a dry patch of fabric and
          avoid the fallout of a saturating experience on an unexpectedly rainy
          January weekend in the Smokies.
          >
          > Postscript: In an effort to validate whether or not the seams
          simply needed to be sealed, I decided to submit myself to another
          potential round of torture. I purchased and applied liberal coats of
          seam sealer – 3 external coats and 2 internal coats to be exact – to
          every seam on the tent. Four weeks later, I went back to the Smokies
          with my father and faced another weekend of winter weather. He, too,
          had purchased the same model tent (before my previously-described
          experience) and now sealed the seams on his tent. Once again, the
          results were terrible. While the leaking was less (maybe just because
          it rained less), everything in my tent was thoroughly soaked. My
          father's tent performed slightly better (better sealed or inconsistent
          results from the factory?) but still let an unacceptable amount of
          water into the tent.

          ### EDIT: This, perhaps, should have been the experience you were
          reviewing. If a tent leaks after sealing, that's a bad business.

          >
          > Post-postscript: For those of you who are new to backpacking and
          find yourselves impressed with all the fancy names (i.e. 1.9 oz. Nylon
          Taffeta with 600mm Coating) for tent fabrics, consider this fair
          warning. Not all tents are created equal. And features such as
          factory taped seams and bathtub floors are critical in wet weather.
          While more expensive tents may also leak, my experience with this tent
          is that it arguably keeps out about as much water as a sieve.
          >
          >
          >
          > Summary
          >
          > Based upon my experience, the Wenzel StarLite Tent - Ultralight
          Solo is unacceptable for inclement weather and is truly a solo tent,
          rather than the 1-2 capacity listed on a popular reseller's website.
          >
          > Pros –
          >
          > Relatively lightweight
          > Small pack profile
          > Economic savings
          > Possibly a good choice in drier climates
          > Cons –
          >
          > Not for inclement weather or situations where there is a chance
          of inclement weather
          > Materials (i.e. seams, fabrics) are not suitable for any
          moderately rough treatment; this is a fair-weather, light-treatment
          shelter
          > Floor size tapers
          > Middle of tent sags; guy ropes do not help (even in fair weather)
          > Getting in and out of tent is difficult due to front guy rope
          > Rear "window" of tent is a triangle about 3" height x 4" width
          > Not freestanding
          > No bathtub floor
          > No factory-taped seams
          > Somewhat claustrophobic without more window coverage (only about
          2sq ft of window)
          > Single-wall design
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Check out the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta - Fire up a more powerful
          email and get things done faster.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • edwardripleyduggan
          Jeremy, Just to confirm, the owner review isn t acceptable in its present form. The main point is not enough use. Also, unless Wenzel neglected to state that
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 7, 2006
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            Jeremy,

            Just to confirm, the owner review isn't acceptable in its present
            form. The main point is not enough use. Also, unless Wenzel neglected
            to state that seam sealing was required in the accompanying
            literature, that disastrous first trip is not what we would consider
            fair use of the product (the point I made in my edit of that section).
            It's such a standard procedure, unless the literature informs one that
            the seams are taped. Few are.

            Please don't be too discouraged. At least a couple of us got a chuckle
            out of your vivid account, and that speaks to the fact that your
            writing style is lively and interesting. Again, get a little
            mentoring, draw up a new OR (not a tent or pack--these are technically
            demanding), and you'll be ready to roll. Try to choose something that
            is still in manufacture, too. Good luck!

            Ted.
          • jeremy.drobnick
            Ted - Thanks for your feedback. Looks like I bit off more than I could chew this first round. While I did actually use the tent a third time (I did not
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 7, 2006
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              Ted -

              Thanks for your feedback.

              Looks like I bit off more than I could chew this first round. While
              I did actually use the tent a third time (I did not mention it in
              the review due to perceived space constraints), it sounds like there
              are several other reasons not to attempt a revision on this product
              (no longer manufactured, seams not taped/fair use, etc).

              Back to the drawing board. I will get a mentor as suggested and
              give it another shot, with another product.

              Thanks again.
              JD




              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "edwardripleyduggan"
              <erd@...> wrote:
              >
              > Jeremy,
              >
              > Just to confirm, the owner review isn't acceptable in its present
              > form. The main point is not enough use. Also, unless Wenzel
              neglected
              > to state that seam sealing was required in the accompanying
              > literature, that disastrous first trip is not what we would
              consider
              > fair use of the product (the point I made in my edit of that
              section).
              > It's such a standard procedure, unless the literature informs one
              that
              > the seams are taped. Few are.
              >
              > Please don't be too discouraged. At least a couple of us got a
              chuckle
              > out of your vivid account, and that speaks to the fact that your
              > writing style is lively and interesting. Again, get a little
              > mentoring, draw up a new OR (not a tent or pack--these are
              technically
              > demanding), and you'll be ready to roll. Try to choose something
              that
              > is still in manufacture, too. Good luck!
              >
              > Ted.
              >
            • edwardripleyduggan
              Jeremy, Thank you for taking my edit and suggestions gracefully! I really don t think you will have too much trouble getting a good OR together, especially
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 7, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Jeremy,

                Thank you for taking my edit and suggestions gracefully! I really
                don't think you will have too much trouble getting a good OR together,
                especially with the help of a monitor.

                Best,

                Ted.


                --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "jeremy.drobnick"
                <jeremy.drobnick@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ted -
                >
                > Thanks for your feedback.
                >
                > Looks like I bit off more than I could chew this first round. While
                > I did actually use the tent a third time (I did not mention it in
                > the review due to perceived space constraints), it sounds like there
                > are several other reasons not to attempt a revision on this product
                > (no longer manufactured, seams not taped/fair use, etc).
                >
                > Back to the drawing board. I will get a mentor as suggested and
                > give it another shot, with another product.
                >
                > Thanks again.
                > JD
                >
                >
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