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Repost: Owner Review: High Sierra Gulp 1.5 L Hydration pack by Samson

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  • Samson Phan
    High Sierra Gulp 1.5 Liter Hydration Pack Tester Bio Name: Samson Phan Age: 24 Gender: Male Height: 5 10 (1.52 m) Weight: 145 lbs (66 kg) Email address:
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 13, 2006
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      High Sierra Gulp 1.5 Liter Hydration Pack


      Tester Bio
      Name: Samson Phan
      Age: 24
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5' 10" (1.52 m)
      Weight: 145 lbs (66 kg)
      Email address: Sphan@...
      City: Stanford
      State: California
      Country: USA
      Date: September 13, 2006

      Backpacking background: I used to help guide trips with a
      student group at my school, usually on weekends. I've had a
      number of longer excursions, but never for more than a week. We are the type of hikers who brought just about everything with us. I do a lot of car camping, taking hikes from base camp (my car).

      Product Information
      Manufacturer: High Sierra Sport Company
      Year of Manufacturer: 2004
      URL: http://www.highsierrasport.com
      Weight as delivered: 1 lb 12.5 oz. (0.804 kg)

      The main compartment holds a 1.5-liter (51 flow oz) water reservoir. Features include a water reservoir pressure bite valve for hands free use. The insulated water tube cover prevents damage from abrasion of the 2 ft long tube and supposedly prevents freezing. The elastic shock cord allows for attaching extra gear on the outside. A special material called “Vapel Mesh” pads the back and shoulder straps and allows for circulation. Elsewhere, 600-denier Duralite material is used. The pack measures 13" x 8" (33 cm x 20.32 cm). It comes in a variety of colors (Mine was black, the colored ones have
      some highly reflective trim).
      The bladder is made of polyurethane. The reservoir opening is large (about the size of a typical Nalgene opening) and is sized to fit filters. The bladder is light blue, in case anyone is wondering.


      Field information
      I have used this pack snowshoeing, hiking, and backpacking in the Sierra Nevadas. I usually hike mountainous terrain and high elevation 6000-8000 ft (1800 – 2400 m) ASL. The Sierra Nevada, when I hike, can range from upper 90s (30 C)F to below freezing. The common denominator during my initial use has been for trips when all I really need is to carry water with me. I bought this pack because I wanted a way to carry water without having to lug a bottle in my hand and without the bulk of a full size backpack. The internal compartment’s volume is taken up completely by the reservoir when the bladder is full. Some other packs in the same niche have a zipper pocket to hold small items (keys, bars etc.). This pack does not. The external shock cord holds my light jacket very securely.
      Since my 5000+ (82 L) cubic inch backpack doesn’t have a detachable pack, I use this hydration pack when I’m in the backcountry and just want to do short hikes away from my campsite. During the big hike in and out, I use the pack as a protective covering for the bladder, much needed as the bladder material is very vulnerable to punctures. The pack’s weight is comparable to the protective covering found on other bladders.
      While filtering water always seems to need one more hand than I have, the large reservoir opening makes for easier filling with filters that have Nalgene adaptors. The bite valve seems flimsier than models made by other manufacturers and seemed more prone to leakage.
      I like how the pack fits between the shoulder blades and hugs the body. I use it a lot for trail running. When running, it seems to be the optimal place for a pack to reduce the amount of swaying. To furher reduce the amount of swaying, I added a sternum strap. When full, it does have a few pressure points, namely right on the spine. As I drink, though, it becomes more form fitting.
      I used the pack extensively when snowshoeing in the Sierra Nevada. On one particular winter hike, I noticed that I couldn’t feel the pressure points anymore, probably as a result of the few layers. The neoprene tube covering delayed the onset of freezing on most trips.
      Fast forward a few months. During another snowshoe trip, I found that it had sprung a leak at the juncture of the tube and the reservoir. Closer inspection revealed that the plastic fitting that connects the tube and the bladder had a crack in it. Because the surrounding material is highly flexible, fatigue of the material wasn’t the cause of the leak. While the temperature was below freezing, I don’t believe ice had formed and ruptured the joint from the inside because the water remained liquid throughout the trip and had flowed out. The leak was probably as a result of a manufacturing defect. Fortunately, the pack is warranted against manufacturing defects for the life of the product. I sent the damaged bladder back to the manufacturer; two weeks later, I received a new reservoir. While it is unfortunate that it had sprung a leak during my trip, the warranty process was very quick and painless.

      In summary, the Gulp is a great when all I want to carry is a hydration bladder. I liked the large reservoir opening, the inclusion of a tube cover, and the lifetime warranty. The negatives include a lack of a pocket, a flimsy bite valve and the occurrence of a leak.



      ---------------------------------
      Get your own web address for just $1.99/1st yr. We'll help. Yahoo! Small Business.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • rayestrella1
      OK Samson, we are getting there. You missed a few of the edits from my first post. Please check for all of them. Once you ve made these changes, please post
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 13, 2006
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        OK Samson, we are getting there. You missed a few of the edits from
        my first post. Please check for all of them.

        Once you've made these changes, please post the HTML version of your
        review, including any pictures (which are always a welcome addition),
        to the Test area of the site. You can find it at the very end of the
        list of review categories after you log in to backpackgeartest.org,
        or you can click this link:

        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/

        After successfully uploading it view the test version in your
        browser to make sure it looks good and all links work as expected.
        Remember that what you see here is what the rest of the world will
        see. If you have trouble with this or questions about posting, I
        encourage you to ask questions at our companion Yahoo! support group
        at:

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTFileUploadHelp/

        Let me know here when you are happy with the test version. (REPOST
        again please.) I will take a look at it and we will go from there.

        Almost done!

        Ray



        ***High Sierra Gulp 1.5 Liter Hydration Pack

        EDIT: this is great, just add Owner Review underneath it somewhere.



        ***It comes in a variety of colors (Mine was black, the colored ones
        have
        some highly reflective trim).

        EDIT: do you mean it "is" black? Do you still have it?

        ***I have used this pack snowshoeing, hiking, and backpacking in the
        Sierra
        Nevadas.

        EDIT: no "s" in Nevada


        ***The Sierra Nevada, when I hike, can range from upper 90s (30 C)F
        to below freezing.

        EDIT: from "the" upper 90s F (30 C) to below freezing.



        ***The common denominator during my initial use has been for trips
        when all I really need is to carry water with me.

        Edit: this does not read right to me. How about something like, "I
        bought this to use on trips that all I really need to carry is some
        water."


        ***To furher reduce the amount of swaying,

        EDIT: further
      • Samson Phan
        Hi Ray, Thanks for working with me. After some tweaks, it s good to go! thanks again sam
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 7, 2006
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          Hi Ray,
          Thanks for working with me. After some tweaks, it's good to go!
          thanks again

          sam

          --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "rayestrella1"
          <rayestrella@...> wrote:
          >
          > OK Samson, we are getting there. You missed a few of the edits from
          > my first post. Please check for all of them.
          >
          > Once you've made these changes, please post the HTML version of your
          > review, including any pictures (which are always a welcome addition),
          > to the Test area of the site. You can find it at the very end of the
          > list of review categories after you log in to backpackgeartest.org,
          > or you can click this link:
          >
          > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/
          >
          > After successfully uploading it view the test version in your
          > browser to make sure it looks good and all links work as expected.
          > Remember that what you see here is what the rest of the world will
          > see. If you have trouble with this or questions about posting, I
          > encourage you to ask questions at our companion Yahoo! support group
          > at:
          >
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTFileUploadHelp/
          >
          > Let me know here when you are happy with the test version. (REPOST
          > again please.) I will take a look at it and we will go from there.
          >
          > Almost done!
          >
          > Ray
          >
          >
          >
          > ***High Sierra Gulp 1.5 Liter Hydration Pack
          >
          > EDIT: this is great, just add Owner Review underneath it somewhere.
          >
          >
          >
          > ***It comes in a variety of colors (Mine was black, the colored ones
          > have
          > some highly reflective trim).
          >
          > EDIT: do you mean it "is" black? Do you still have it?
          >
          > ***I have used this pack snowshoeing, hiking, and backpacking in the
          > Sierra
          > Nevadas.
          >
          > EDIT: no "s" in Nevada
          >
          >
          > ***The Sierra Nevada, when I hike, can range from upper 90s (30 C)F
          > to below freezing.
          >
          > EDIT: from "the" upper 90s F (30 C) to below freezing.
          >
          >
          >
          > ***The common denominator during my initial use has been for trips
          > when all I really need is to carry water with me.
          >
          > Edit: this does not read right to me. How about something like, "I
          > bought this to use on trips that all I really need to carry is some
          > water."
          >
          >
          > ***To furher reduce the amount of swaying,
          >
          > EDIT: further
          >
        • rayestrella1
          Hello Samson, You still have some issues with your HTML. It has a lot of extra spaces that make the review very hard to read. The font is quite small too but I
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 8, 2006
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            Hello Samson,

            You still have some issues with your HTML. It has a lot of extra spaces
            that make the review very hard to read. The font is quite small too but
            I can live with that.

            Please look at it once you load it to the test folder to make sure that
            it looks right. Sometimes it changes on you during the upload.

            We have a help forum if you need assistance with it.

            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BGTFileUploadHelp/?yguid=209560176

            Let me know when it is ready, and keep your spirits up. We will get it
            yet.

            Ray
          • Samson Phan
            Ray, I finally got the OR for the GUlp posted. I did not load it in the right area, then I was emailing the wrong address. Thanks for your patience and
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 1, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Ray,
              I finally got the OR for the GUlp posted. I did not load it in the right area, then I was emailing the wrong address. Thanks for your patience and understanding of my inability to use computers


              BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com wrote: A forum for posting impressions and eval A forum for posting impressions and eval
              Messages In This Digest (4 Messages)
              1.
              Re: APPLICATION TO TEST-VALANDRE CLASSIC 700 From: sololight2001
              2.
              REPOST: OWNER REVIEW: Yaktrax Pro - Jo Ann Moffi From: Jo
              3.
              EDIT: OR - CERRO TORRE GECKO 65L Internal Frame Backpack - Christens From: nazdarovye
              4.
              Owner Review - SmartWool Tee - Ray Estrella From: rayestrella1
              View All Topics | Create New Topic
              Messages
              1.
              Re: APPLICATION TO TEST-VALANDRE CLASSIC 700 Posted by: "sololight2001" cyr@... sololight2001 Tue Oct 31, 2006 3:16 am (PST) Thanks. I goofed on the posting and missed the test call....oops...
              Pat

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Leesa J" <leesaj@...> wrote:
              >
              > Patrick,
              >
              > You sent this to the wrong list - it needs to go to
              > backpackgeartesters@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Leesa
              >


              Back to top
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              Messages in this topic (3)

              2.
              REPOST: OWNER REVIEW: Yaktrax Pro - Jo Ann Moffi Posted by: "Jo" jomoffi@... jomoffi Tue Oct 31, 2006 2:17 pm (PST) Hi Steve,

              Thanks for the edits. After I post the OR, I was thinking I could
              have elaborated a bit on the trail useage, but I figured it would be
              better to wait for the edit to occur first.

              The edited version is also in the test folder:
              http://snipurl.com/10wm4

              I have made the edits you indicated, and I have a couple of comments
              of my own:

              YakTrax Pro on Merrell Boots
              ***EDIT: I suggest removing this line and noting which boots you used
              in the body of your review.

              --- Comment: That was just the marker for a picture. It only shows
              up when the picture is not available. It does not appear in the HTML
              version in the test folder. I have removed them from this post, but
              they will still be available for those people who cannot see the
              images on the website.

              Putting on the Yaktrax Pro:

              To get the Yaktrax Pro on, put the toe of the shoe under the Velcro
              strap and into the toe end of the rubber 'frame'. Then, while
              grasping the thickened portion at the back if the Yaktrax Pro, push
              the toe of the shoe into the rubber frame at the same time as
              stretching the Yaktrax Pro over the heel of the shoe. This is easily
              accomplished when wearing the shoe. Getting the force to push the
              shoe and stretch the Yaktrax Pro at the same time when not wearing the
              shoe is a challenge I have yet to master. Once the Yaktrax Pro is on
              the shoe, go around the edge of the shoe and pull up on the outer
              edges of the rubber webbing so that it is around the entire outside
              perimeter of the shoe. The toe end of the Yaktrax Pro has a distinct
              mesh pattern that allows for easy centering at the toe of the shoe and
              the heel end of the Yaktrax has a thickened tab for ease of pulling on
              and off and centering at the heel of the shoe. Once the Yaktrax Pro is
              satisfactorily situated, tighten the Velcro strap across the top of
              the shoe.

              ***EDIT QUESTION: Is this your personal description, or Yaktrax's? If
              the former, personalize it a bit to make that clear; if the latter,
              consider removing this and restating your own experience.

              --- Comment: This is entirely my own description here. Yaktrax
              provides no instruction on how to get them on other than to stretch
              them over the bottom of the shoe and fasten the velcro. :) I'm not
              sure what you mean by personalizing it, there is an 'I' statement in
              there, and this is generally my writing style, analytical and
              technical writing with concise descriptions. If you can expand here, I
              will do what I can to make it more personal.

              Thanks again for the edit Steve!

              Jo Ann
              -----------------------------
              Yaktrax Pro
              Owner Review
              October 15, 2006

              Name: Jo Ann Moffi
              Age: 33
              Gender: Female
              Height: 5' 6" (168 cm)
              Weight: 175 lb (79 kg)
              Shoe Size: US 8 women's
              Email address: jomoffi AT gmail DOT com
              City, State, Country: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada

              Backpacking Background:

              I was introduced to backpacking about 15 years ago when I met my
              husband. We have been backpacking, canoe camping, car camping, hiking,
              and participating in all sorts of outdoor activities ever since. We
              live in a border town (US & Canada), so we spend lots of time in both
              countries for our outdoor excursions. My most recent foray has been
              into Adventure Racing. When making a decision on gear, I like to go
              lightweight and practical. I don't like to carry around extraneous
              bits and pieces.

              Product Information:

              Manufacturer: Yaktrax, Inc.
              Manufacture Date: 2005
              URL: http://yaktrax.com
              Style: Yaktrax Pro
              MSRP: $29.95
              Size: Small (Available in unisex sizing Small, Medium, Large, and
              Extra Large)
              Color: Black
              Weight: 154 to 156 g (5.1 to 5.5 oz) depending on size
              Warranty: Full 90 day warranty should anything happen to the Yaktrax
              or if satisfaction is not complete.

              The Yaktrax Pro are made with rubber webbing covered with metal coils.
              The coils are made from 1.4 mm (0.06 in) steel and the rubber is
              touted to be heavy duty, natural rubber. The rubber webbing forms two
              large 'X' patterns on the bottom of the shoe and one smaller 'X' at
              the toe that are covered in the steel coils. Yaktrax, Inc. calls this
              system the SkidLock coiled design that provides 360 degrees of
              traction. The remainder of the rubber webbing around the edge of the
              Yaktrax Pro is not covered in coils. The Yaktrax Pro has a Velcro
              strap that goes across the top of the shoe. This is one of the
              differences between the Yaktrax Walker and the Yaktrax Pro, the other
              being a more durable rubber blend.

              Yaktrax, Inc. claims the Yaktrax Pro gives instant traction,
              confidence and safety on ice and packed snow, enabling the user to
              walk and run as if ice and packed snow were dry surfaces. Yaktrax,
              Inc. indicates the Yaktrax Pro can be worn in temperatures as low as
              -40.55 C (-41 F).

              Yaktrax Pro Features (according to the Yaktrax, Inc. website):
              • Easy On/Off
              • Walk Naturally
              • Spikeless/Ultralight
              • Helps Reduce the Risk of Falls & Injuries

              Putting on the Yaktrax Pro:

              To get the Yaktrax Pro on, put the toe of the shoe under the Velcro
              strap and into the toe end of the rubber 'frame'. Then, while
              grasping the thickened portion at the back if the Yaktrax Pro, push
              the toe of the shoe into the rubber frame at the same time as
              stretching the Yaktrax Pro over the heel of the shoe. This is easily
              accomplished when wearing the shoe. Getting the force to push the
              shoe and stretch the Yaktrax Pro at the same time when not wearing the
              shoe is a challenge I have yet to master. Once the Yaktrax Pro is on
              the shoe, go around the edge of the shoe and pull up on the outer
              edges of the rubber webbing so that it is around the entire outside
              perimeter of the shoe. The toe end of the Yaktrax Pro has a distinct
              mesh pattern that allows for easy centering at the toe of the shoe and
              the heel end of the Yaktrax has a thickened tab for ease of pulling on
              and off and centering at the heel of the shoe. Once the Yaktrax Pro is
              satisfactorily situated, tighten the Velcro strap across the top of
              the shoe.

              I have worn the Yaktrax Pro on my running shoes and hiking boots. My
              normal shoe size is 7.5 to 8.5. I chose a size small based on the
              manufacturer's size guide. The sizing was accurate for my shoes.

              Field Information

              Location or locations where the shoes were worn:
              In and around Sault Ste Marie, Ontario and surrounding Algoma region.

              Description of Location(s):
              Around town on ice and snow covered sidewalks and streets, snow and
              ice covered trails, some muddy trails. Local trails included:

              * 5 km (3.11 mi) trail along the Sault Ste. Marie Canal system,
              including St. mary's Island and Whitefish Island. Trails are
              reasonably well marked, some are only there because they are well
              frequented. These trails are not maintained in the winter and travel
              on them is at your own risk. Many feet traverse these trails so they
              are easy to find. The trails here are flat, with the occasional water
              crossing (ice crossing in winter).
              * Hiawatha Highlands trails including the Crystal Creek Trail
              system, Lookout Trail system, and Red Pine Trail system.
              Approximately 40 km (24.84 mi) of trail through Boreal Forest. Trails
              are well marked and regularly maintained. In the winter, they are
              groomed for use as cross country ski trails, both skate skiing and
              classic skiing. Walking on the trails is prohibited from late
              November to late March/early April. The trails are somewhat hilly on
              the Red Pine Trail and the Crystal Creek Trail systems.
              * Fort Creek Conservation area is approximately 77 hectares (191
              acres) with trails snaking randomly throughout. This area gets a fair
              amount of use in winter, but the trails are not maintained.

              From about January until March, I primarily used the Yaktrax on snow
              covered sidewalks and streets. I wore them on the trails at the Sault
              Ste. Marie Canal and the Fort Creek Conservation area periodically
              from January until March. Once the trails were no longer ski-able at
              Hiawatha Highlands, I also started heading out there for weekly outings.

              Weather Conditions:
              Bitter cold January and February averaging -10 C (18 F), March
              averaging -4 C (7.2 F). Snowfall coverage in January and February
              averages 50 cm (19.69 in). Active weather included snow flurries,
              blowing snow, overcast, and sunny days.

              Product Review

              My original reason for purchase of the Yaktrax was for running on ice
              and snow around town. After several near wipe outs in slippery
              conditions, I ordered the Yaktrax Pro from an online retailer,
              sight-unseen. The Yaktrax arrived in a plastic wrapped package with
              instructions. The instructions gave a brief outline on how to put on
              the Yaktrax Pro, care, and use guidelines.

              The Yaktrax Pro are fairly easy to get on and off while indoors.
              However, once outside, getting the Yaktrax Pro on and off with cold
              fingers and (usually) wet/snowy shoes or boots is not a pleasant
              experience. Removing the Yaktrax Pro with gloves and/or mittens is
              possible it is easy enough to just rip open the Velcro strap and pull
              on the tab at the back of the Yaktrax Pro in a downward direction.
              The rubber just springs off the shoe. Putting them on is not easily
              accomplished without removing gloves, and is impossible without
              removing mittens. If the gloves are not bulky, putting on the Yaktrax
              Pro is just like doing it with ungloved hands. Too much dexterity is
              required of the fingers to make it possible to stretch the rubber over
              the shoe with mittens on. This is the nature of winter though, and I
              certainly don't expect any different. The design of the Yaktrax is
              intentionally tight to ensure the Yaktrax Pro do not come off during
              walking and running. It would be extremely difficult to design a
              removable traction device without this issue.

              I used the Yaktrax Pro while hiking on snow packed trails. Most days
              I wore a small waist pack for water carrying, a couple of times on
              longer walks with my nephews, I would carry a backpack for water and
              extra 'kid' paraphernalia like mitts, hats, snacks, etc. The Yaktrax
              Pro performed similarly to ice and snow packed roads. When hiking up
              snow packed and ice covered hills, the Yaktrax Pro performed just as
              well as on flat land. I would hike between 5 km (3.11 mi) and 10 km
              (6.21 mi), depending on my time availability for the day.

              When used on muddy trails, the Yaktrax does slip a bit until they hit
              a more solid surface to bite into. They still perform better than a
              naked shoe in muddy conditions. Yaktrax, Inc. does not advocate using
              their product in these conditions.

              I also used the Yaktrax Pro for most of my winter runs last year. I
              ran mostly in town on snow and ice covered sidewalks and streets. The
              Yaktrax Pro performed exceptionally well. Not once can I recall
              slipping, even when running on glare ice. It takes a bit to have the
              confidence to run/walk on such surfaces without instinct kicking in
              and changing your stride. Once I was sure I wasn't going to be
              slipping, I actually came to enjoy those slippery patches just for the
              chance to 'test' the Yaktrax Pro!

              As the winter progressed and the weather started turning warmer, it
              was a bit more of a challenge running in the Yaktrax Pro on sidewalks
              and roads. Yaktrax, Inc. does not recommend wearing the Yaktrax Pro on
              any hard surface like pavement, concrete, gravel, tile, linoleum, etc.
              There were times when I was running partially in the snowbank to avoid
              the melted spots on the sidewalks. On longer portions of trail and
              sidewalk that we clear of ice and snow I would remove the Yaktrax Pro
              and put them back on later if necessary.

              The Yaktrax Pro saw about 12-15 km (7.45-9.32 mi) of running per week,
              plus 5-10 km (3.11-6.21 mi) of hiking per week over the course of four
              months. There was no evidence of wear on the rubber, and some mild
              wear on the metal coils. The coils were shiny when I purchased the
              Yaktrax Pro and they are dull now.

              As a final note, when I was pulling these out for the first time this
              year, the steel coils had some rust on them. After wearing them on
              one outing, the rust is now gone.

              Most desirable features:
              - Exceptional traction on ice and packed snow.
              - Stay on both my hiking boots and running shoes without slipping.

              Least desirable features:
              - Not easy to get on with cold fingers.

              Summary
              The Yaktrax Pro provide exceptional traction on ice and snow while
              hiking, running, walking, etc. They will be my traction device of
              choice for many years to come. An excellent product!


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              Messages in this topic (1)

              3.
              EDIT: OR - CERRO TORRE GECKO 65L Internal Frame Backpack - Christens Posted by: "nazdarovye" nazdarovye@... nazdarovye Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:25 pm (PST) Hi Ryan -

              Thanks for the OR on the Gecko 65 pack, and your patience in waiting
              for an edit.

              I've provided edits and comments below - as usual, make the
              corrections and post a revised version here with "REVISED" included in
              your message subject line.

              I note that you gave experiences of your son or his friend with the
              pack (I ask for clarification below). Generally reviews should be your
              own experiences only, though if it was your son, in this case it can
              squeak by.

              Also, you asked whether the pack might be considered as winter gear
              for the current call, mentioning the ice axe loops and some other
              features. However, I don't believe you addressed those in your review;
              have you used those features, or used the pack for winter camping and
              mountaineering?

              Regards,
              Steve

              [EDITS FOLLOW:]

              CERRO TORRE GECKO 65L

              ***EDIT: As far as I can see on the site (which is mostly in Korean),
              the name is "Gecko 65", without the "L"; can you verify and correct as
              needed throughout your review?

              URL http://www.cerrotorreusa.com

              ***EDIT: This resolves to a Korean site now. Is the product still
              manufactured and available in the U.S.?

              Listed Volume 3,966 cubic inches (64,991 cubic cm)

              ***EDIT NOTE: Or, simply, "65 L"; you could also use "cu in" as an
              abbreviation for cubic inches

              Material of Construction lightweight 420D ripstop fabric and 1000D kodra

              ***EDIT: "Kodra"

              An external pocket, with a waterproof zipper, for pencils, keys, maps,
              etc"A"
              slanted hip belt that splits in two; one to go above the top of the
              hip and one
              to go below to allow flexible movementIce axe loopsA small pocket on
              the hip
              belt for a compass, lip balm, knife, etc.Dual ski loopsA mesh pocket
              on each
              side of the pack along the hips; great for water bottlesZippers running
              vertically down each side for easy access to items in the packTwo rows
              of nylon
              daisy chain to attach items to the outside of the packHydration
              compatible,
              including port on the right shoulder, just above the strapA separate
              sleeping
              bag compartment at the bottom of the packWell-ventilated mesh back
              panelMonkey-fist zipper pulls on the sleeping bag compartmentThe upper
              portion
              of the pack is notched out to conform to the contour of the
              headDrawstrings
              inside pack at the top, and just above the sleeping bag
              compartmentFrame is
              adjustable to accommodate small (18" or 46 cm) to large (21" or
              53 cm) torsosSeveral adjustable cinch straps to secure load increase
              comfort

              ***EDIT: This entire paragraph came across missing something - line
              returns, bullet points, spaces - that would have separated sentences.
              There's also a superfluous set of quotation marks on what appears to
              be the start of the second sentence. Please edit to clean it up if
              it's not clear in HTML.

              My 0 F (-18 C) rated Halofill mummy bag did not fit well.

              ***EDITS: "Hollofil" if you're referring to the trademarked DuPont
              insulation; can you provide rough dimensions for the sleeping bag in
              rolled/stuffed form?

              The ventilated mesh back of the pack prevented my back for being totally
              soaked with sweat.

              ***EDIT: "from being"

              The weather conditions during his
              trip were ideal: clear skies, calm winds, and temperatures from the
              mid 50 F in
              the early morning hours to the upper 90 F in late afternoon (10 C – 32 C).

              ***EDITS: "mid 50s F" and "upper 90s F"

              Tye lent his backpack to a friend who did not have one.

              ***EDIT: do you mean the Cerro Torre, or another pack? If the latter,
              and it was your son using the Cerro Torre, remove this prelude as it's
              a bit confusing and irrelevant to the review; if you mean the former,
              and it was your son's friend using the Cerro Torre, then I'd say
              eliminate all of what follows and stick with your own experiences.

              Therefore, each day, using a 5mm static rope through the
              shoulder straps, Tye would hang the pack up10 feet (3 m) in a tree and
              4 feet
              (1.2 m) out from the trunk.

              ***EDITS: consider adding an imperial equivalent for the rope (though
              I can see that this could be an exception to the normal requirement -
              your call); add a space between number and measure at "5 mm" and at
              "up 10"; use "ft" for consistency of abbreviation for feet.

              The Palisades Creek Trail to the lower and upper Palisades Lakes is
              located
              approximately 50 miles (80 km) southeast of Idaho Falls Idaho and
              nearly 60
              miles (97 km) west of Jackson Hole Wyoming. The Upper Palisades Lake
              is about
              6,800 feet (2,071 m) above sea level.

              ***EDIT COMMENT: Consider using "mi" and "ft" for consistency here and
              elsewhere where you spell out measures

              Daytime temperatures were in the 90's F
              (30's C).

              ***EDITS: "90s" and "30s"

              Daytime temperatures were in the 70's F (20's C) and
              nighttime temperatures were most likely in the low 40's F (4 – 9 C).
              On this
              trip, my pack weight was about 22 lb (10 kg).

              ***EDITS: "70s" "20s" and "40s"

              The capacity of the pack is ideal for shorter treks, but for longer
              outings, I
              would like to have the larger Gecko 80 which is 33.75" x 14" x 10.5"
              (86 cm x 36
              cm x 27 cm) weighs 6 lb 10 oz (3 kg) and has a capacity of 4,882 cu. in.
              (80,001 cu cm) or another larger pack.

              ***EDITS: "80 L" is probably as accurate and useful a measure; add an
              em dash or parenthesis after "Gecko 80" and before "or another pack"
              to separate that parenthetical clause with the measures

              The zippers and cinch straps, and buckles are
              in excellent condition.

              ***EDIT SUGGESTION: "zippers, cinch straps and buckles"

              -------------
              My Likes:
              -------------
              Zippers running vertically down each sideSeveral durable cinch straps
              to secure
              load and increase comfortWell-ventilated mesh back panel"A" slanted
              shape hip
              beltTop cover of pack has a zippered pocketFrame is adjustable for
              small (18" or
              46 cm) to large (21" or 53 cm) torsosSmall zippered pocket on the hip
              belt

              -----------------
              My Dislikes:
              -----------------
              For longer outings, I would prefer a pack with more capacityWish top
              pocket
              detached for use as a fanny pack

              ***EDITS: These sections have the same problem with sentences running
              together and superfluous quotation marks as the first main paragraph;
              please fix as needed in HTML if this is not a "Yahooism"

              [END OF EDITS]


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              Messages in this topic (3)

              4.
              Owner Review - SmartWool Tee - Ray Estrella Posted by: "rayestrella1" rayestrella@... rayestrella1 Tue Oct 31, 2006 10:10 pm (PST) It is very slow here. I figured I would spark some action. HTML may
              be found here;

              http://tinyurl.com/ygp4ao

              SmartWool Lightweight Short-sleeved Tee

              Owners Review
              November 3, 2006

              Tester Information
              Name: Raymond Estrella
              Age: 46
              Gender: Male
              Height: 6' 3" (193 cm)
              Weight: 210 lb (95 kg)
              Email address: rayestrella@...
              City: Huntington Beach
              State: California
              Country: USA

              Backpacking Background

              I have been backpacking for over 30 years, all over the state of
              California, and also in Washington, Minnesota, Nevada, Arizona, and
              Idaho. I hike year-round, mostly in the Sierra Nevada, and average
              400 to 500+ miles (640 – 800+ km) per year. As I start my 4th
              decade of backpacking I am making the move to lightweight gear, and
              smaller volume packs. I start early and hike hard so as to enjoy the
              afternoons exploring. I usually take a freestanding tent and enjoy
              hot meals at night. Many of my trips are taken with my brother-in-
              law Dave.

              The product

              Manufacturer: SmartWool
              Web site: www.smartwool.com
              Product: Lightweight Short-sleeve Tee
              Style #: 14-610
              Size: Extra Large
              Year manufactured: 2005
              MSRP: $60.00 (US)
              Weight listed: N/A Weight measured 9 oz ( g)
              Color reviewed: Green
              Warranty: 100% Guarantee

              Product Description

              The SmartWool Lightweight Short-sleeved Tee (hereafter called the
              SmartWool or shirt) is a loose cut t-shirt aimed at outdoorsy types.
              It is made of "100% superfine SmartWool" according to the
              manufacturer, yet inside the shirt near the bottom side is a tag
              that identifies it as 100% Merino wool. On the back of said tag are
              the laundering instructions. They are as follows. Machine wash cold,
              tumble dry low, iron low. DO NOT DRY CLEAN. (I'm a guy, brushing old
              mud from my boots is as close to dry cleaning as I get, they needn't
              worry.) The material is much softer to the touch than cotton but not
              as slick feeling as nylon. I like it.

              I bought my shirt(s) in a size XL to accommodate my height. It is a
              bit baggy on me because of it. The shirts are not offered in Tall
              sizes although I wish they were. It looks like any other t-shirt at
              first glance, (usually the only one I get from most people,
              especially female glancers) but upon more careful inspection it
              reveals itself to be quite a nice piece of work.

              The stitching is some of the best I have ever seen on a t-shirt. (At
              $60.00 US for a tee maybe it better be.) All of the shoulder, arm
              and side seams are sewn with a serge stitch to create both a flat
              and extremely strong seam. I have had many shirts pull apart at the
              shoulder seams from my massive pipes…I mean my heavy backpacks. This
              shirt is still looking good as far as that is concerned. It has
              frayed along the edges of the seams where my shoulder straps have
              rubbed them incessantly, but none have pulled loose. The hems at the
              end of the sleeves and body look from the outside to have two rows
              of stitching, but upon examination inside it is seen that the two
              rows are done at the same time and interlock with each other it
              seems like every other stitch. This would seem to give it some
              redundancy in the event of cutting one of the threads so as not to
              have it run.

              The collar is an example of sewing marvel to me in itself. I made a
              t-shirt in school. The collar was the hardest part and the seam of
              it, while looking good from the outside (my mom was amazed),
              protruded inside where my delicate neck could feel it. (Ever read
              the Princess and the Pea?) The collar on the SmartWool is sewn with
              the same double-run as the hems, but they add an extra fold of
              material folded over again to both the collar and body before
              stitching them together. This results in a seam that looks kind of
              like it has split piping. It ends up being very strong and has
              retained its shape very well, not drooping like many of my shirts
              (and house plants) do.

              Field Conditions

              The SmartWool shirts have been used in San Jacinto State Park and
              Wilderness, San Gorgonio Wilderness and many areas of the eastern
              Sierra Nevada. The lowest elevation seen with them on my back was
              400' (122 m) in Palm Springs California, the highest being on
              Forrester Pass at 13,180' (4017 m). The coldest temperature
              encountered was 28 F (-2 C) near White Mountain, the warmest many
              90+ F (33 C) days in the regional parks of Southern CA. They have
              been worn in cactus covered desert locales, low elevation scrub and
              hardwood areas, pine forests and treeless rock up high. They have
              been rained on, hailed on and mostly sun baked in my pursuit of
              backpacking miles and hiker chicks. (So far miles-thousands, hiker
              chicks-0)

              Observations

              I bought my two SmartWool t-shirts, one short and one long sleeved,
              in late summer of 2005 as part of a move to find the best material
              to combat odor. With the 2005/06 winter season approaching I
              decided to search out some new to me articles of clothing to fight
              the funk. (Winter in my opinion is much worse for clothing-retained
              odor as I am trapped in layers quite often, along with the
              impossibility of washing on the trail.) I purchased three silver-
              incorporating pieces, one more chemical antibacterial treated item
              (I have many), and the SmartWool shirts.

              One concern about them was how they would feel. I always thought of
              wool being itchy like my old hiking socks from the 80s and wool
              button up shirts of the same period. I decided to try it because of
              how soft and non-itchy the company's socks are, of which I have 19
              pairs of varying thicknesses and heights. I was pleased with the
              soft feel of the material. It is softer to touch than cotton.

              When I first got the SmartWool shirts home I washed them. I washed
              them in cold water as recommended and then took them out to air dry.
              They smelled horrible! I think this is what it smells like in New
              Zealand when it rains, a wet sheep. I was thinking there is no way I
              am going to be able to wear this thing hiking. I sweat hard,
              especially while climbing which factors largely into almost all of
              my backpacking trips. After they dried the smell went away, but I
              was still concerned about how they would fare on the trail. It is
              hard enough finding hiking partners without adding Eau-de-sheep to
              my repertoire of olfactory offenses.

              So I took them on a couple of day hikes where they proved themselves
              to be a non-smelly garment. What is more it seemed that they do not
              hold odors too much. The next use really tested this quality out. It
              was another day-hike at the end of October with a twist. The Cactus
              to Clouds hike was called the 5th hardest day hike in America by
              Backpacking Magazine, climbing from 400' (122 m) elevation in Palm
              Springs to the top of San Jacinto at 10,834' (3302 m) in a distance
              of 17 miles (27 km). With the 5 miles back from the peak to the Palm
              Springs Arial Tramway for a ride back down it is a 23 mile (37 km)
              hike that climbs almost constantly for a total of 10,700' (3261 m)
              of gain. I wore both SmartWool shirts starting off at 4:40 AM. By
              5:00 AM I was sweating hard enough to lose the long-sleeve shirt.
              Within another hour the short-sleeved shirt was soaked, a state that
              it would stay in for most the day. As I got above 9,000' (2743 m)
              the wind was getting pretty cold so the long shirt went back on. I
              was still sweating and soaked it also. We took a rest when we
              attained the summit. I had to put a rain coat over both to keep from
              getting too chilled through the wet wool. I lost the coat on the
              quick descent to the tram station. As we were having a well deserved
              beer (OK, two…) while waiting for the tram both shirts were
              noticeably drying out while I sat there. And I noticed that I did
              not smell a fraction as bad as my hiking partner. I had to attribute
              that to the SmartWools as I bet I had sweated at least a quart (1 L)
              that day into my shirts.

              I continued to wear the Smartwools off and on during the spring and
              summer of 2006, always being impressed with the inherent ability of
              the wool to actually win the battle of the B.O. Then I decided to do
              a torture test to the short sleeved shirt as I was planning on
              writing this review.

              I am in the habit of bringing extra shirt, socks and underwear on
              all multi-day backpacking trips. At the end of a hard days hiking I
              try to find a lake to dip in to rinse off the days dirt and sweat.
              Then while I drip-dry I rinse out the days clothing and spread it to
              dry back in camp. Often the drying process will have to be completed
              on my pack during the next days hiking. On my recent four-day trip
              from Onion Valley to Horseshoe Meadow via Cottonwood Pass (east-side
              Sierra Nevada) I decided to wear the short sleeved shirt every day
              without benefit of rinsing out between wearing. I did bring the long
              sleeved SmartWool also but only wore it in camp to let the short
              sleeved shirt have a chance to at least dry out off of my back. Over
              the course of the trip I put in 58 miles (93 km) and 11,100' (3383
              m) of elevation gain in temps that got as high as 90 F (32 C) down
              near Horseshoe. The shirt was soaked every day of the hike. Here is
              a shot at the top of Forrester Pass. The shirt is pretty much solid
              soaked. It is actually a lighter color than it seems.

              By the end of the second day it was getting salt lines on the front
              of it where my backpack's shoulder straps ride. By the last day it
              had salt marks over the whole chest area. (Did I mention that I
              sweat a bit?)

              At the end of the trip I purposely wadded it up and tossed it on the
              extra bed in my room in Lone Pine CA. (Dave had to bail mid-hike.)
              The next day after having a night to get back to normal (if I can
              ever be called normal) I unwadded it and gave it a good wiff. And
              another. I was major impressed. There was no pungent body odor even
              under the arms. It smelled dirty to be sure but was not "funky", or
              sharp.

              On the down side the shirt seem to be a little less durable than my
              other shirts. A little snag on the long sleeved shirt resulted in a
              tear in the sleeve near the wrist. And the short sleeved shirt is
              pilling on the back where my hipbelt rides and the shoulders, along
              with the edges of the seams as mentioned earlier.

              The results of my experience with these has me determined to try
              some thicker models this winter. Stay tuned for the results.

              Pros: Excellent wicking ability, quick drying, superb odor control.

              Cons: Expensive, not as durable as other materials, does not come in
              tall sizes.



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              Samson Phan
              10286 East Annadale
              Sanger, CA 93657-9725
              samsonphan@...


              ---------------------------------
              Check out the New Yahoo! Mail - Fire up a more powerful email and get things done faster.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • chcoa
              Hi Samson, To where did you upload it? If has not come over on the recently uploaded list and I could ot find it with a BGT search? jamie d Edit Admin Manager
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 2, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Samson,

                To where did you upload it? If has not come over on the recently
                uploaded list and I could ot find it with a BGT search?

                jamie d
                Edit Admin Manager

                --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Samson Phan <samsonphan@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Ray,
                > I finally got the OR for the GUlp posted. I did not load it in the
                right area, then I was emailing the wrong address. Thanks for your
                patience and understanding of my inability to use computers
                >
              • rayestrella1
                ... Hi Samson, I still do not see it. Did you put it in the High Sierra Sports Gulp folder? Ray
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 3, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  >Ray,
                  >I finally got the OR for the GUlp posted. I did not load it in the
                  >right area, then I was emailing the wrong address. Thanks for your
                  >patience and understanding of my inability to use computers

                  Hi Samson, I still do not see it. Did you put it in the High Sierra
                  Sports Gulp folder?

                  Ray
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.