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REPOST - Owner Review: Montbell Nupuri 45

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  • Tim Streeb
    Hi Ted, Thanks for your initial help, I look forward to your further thoughts and recommendations. I edited my review to incorporate the other measurement
    Message 1 of 11 , May 21 8:50 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Ted,

      Thanks for your initial help, I look forward to your further thoughts and recommendations. I edited my review to incorporate the other measurement units, so please let me know what you think.

      Thanks!
      Tim

      Montbell Nupuri Pack 45

      Tester
      Name: Tim Streeb
      Age: 26
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6’ 1” (1.85 m)
      Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
      Email address: sole_bgt at yahoo dot com
      City, State, Country: Denver, CO, USA
      Date: 05/09/2006

      Backpacking Background:
      A native of Colorado, I’ve grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing, trail running and skiing all over the state. I started hiking and backpacking as part of my scouting curriculum and fell in love with the adventure, challenge and solitude of exploring the mountains. Now a weekend warrior, I get outside every weekend averaging 100 (161 km) miles of hiking per season.

      While I do consider myself a lightweight backpacker, I’m not what you’d consider an ultralighter. My base weight is typically 15lbs, (6.80 kg) but that’s usually because I carry all the group gear. I am most definitely a gear junkie, and have spent countless hours reading reviews at BPGT.

      A majority of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado, although I have been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then. I also enjoy climbing peaks, and have hiked my fair share of Colorado 14ers. Also, since I’m a huge skier, I enjoy winter hiking and ski-touring.

      Product information:
      a. Manufacturer: Montbell
      b. Year of manufacture: 2005
      c. URL: www.montbell.com
      d. Listed weight 3 lbs 1.6 oz (1.41 kg)
      e. Weight as delivered. 2 lbs 15.5 oz (1.35 kg)
      f. Price: (US) $159

      Product description.
      The Montbell Nupuri 45 is a 2750 cubic inch (45 liter) ultralight backpack intended for multi-day backpacking and climbing trips. The name “Nupuri” means “mountain” in Ainu, the language of the native people living in the Japanese archipelago and the Kuril Islands. The Nupuri 45 (referred to simply as “Nupuri” for this report) is the largest of three packs in Monbell’s Nupuri product line, as the company also offers very similar 25 liter and 35 liter packs.

      A majority of the Nupuri is constructed out of Dyneema® ripstop nylon, a lightweight checkered fabric that is highly resistant to tears and lightweight. The pack comes in one basic color – dark blue – and I was informed by a Montbell sales associate that this was the only color Dyneema fabric is made in (I have my doubts regarding the accuracy of this claim, but I digress). Dyneema is the same material used in many rock climbing products (slings, lightweight harnesses, etc.) as it’s incredibly strong.

      From the Montbell web site:
      “Dyneema is a super-strong polyethylene fiber produced using a patented gel spinning process. This remarkable fiber is up to 15 times stronger than steel and, weight-for-weight, is 40% stronger than competing aramid fibers. It has high energy absorption and low elongation. Dyneema floats on water, and is extremely resistant to abrasion, moisture, UV rays and chemicals. As a result, it has an almost unlimited range of applications, providing maximum strength and security for minimum weight.”

      While a majority of the pack is constructed with Dyneema, Montbell does use some heavy weight Cordura in areas highly susceptible to abrasions, such as the bottom of the main pack body, side water bottle pockets and top of the lid.

      The pack’s suspension is very basic. Rigidity is provided by a .25 in (0.64 cm) thick, removable foam frame sheet that’s relatively flexible. Montbell notes that this frame sheet can be used as an emergency bivy pad, although I’m not confident this claim would serve useful in a real life application due to its very small size. The Nupuri features a padded hip belt and back panel, and anatomically curved, padded shoulder straps with chest strap. One important suspension item to note is that the Nupuri does not have any load lifter straps.

      As for bells and whistles, the Nupuri offers users a surprising amount of useful features for such a lightweight pack. In total, the Nupuri features 10 pockets – two on the hip belt, the main compartment, two Cordura water bottle pockets attached on each side of the main compartment, two smaller pockets attached to the front of the main pack body and a top lid comprised of 3 zippered pockets. The Montbell web site advertises the Nupuri as having “elasticized pockets and compression straps for skis of trekking poles (25, 45)”, although my pack does not have elasticized pockets suitable for carrying skis. This is most likely a typo on Montbell’s site. One big drawback is the pack does not have a hydration bladder sleeve.

      Four side compression straps are used to secure loads, in addition to two trekking pole or ice ax loops with corresponding attachment points. There’s an additional compression strap under the pack’s lid, which I believe is intended to secure climbing ropes. There are also two additional compression straps running vertically on the top of the pack lid, offering additional attachment points for other gear or clothing.

      The Nupuri’s main compartment is top loading, and features a relatively large extension collar with two toggled draw cords. On each side of the main compartment, in-between the side compression straps, the Nupuri has zippered openings intended to allow the user additional access to the pack’s contents. The pack lid is sewn directly onto the main compartment and is not adjustable.

      Field information
      I used the Nupuri for a majority of my 2005 summer backpacking season. For the purposes of this report, I will reference the pack’s performance during an 18 mile (28.98 km) overnight trip in Alaska on the Resurrection Trail in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. The Resurrection Trail is a relatively easy hike, as there’s not a lot of elevation gain, the trail is maintained well and not very rocky. There were several water crossings along the trail, although they were very small streams with little potential for hazard. The weather over the course of our two day hike was overcast and foggy, with spells of light rain. The thick, overgrown temperate rain forest of the Kenai offered plenty of opportunities to attack and snag the pack, and also did an efficient job of transporting any moisture on leaves to the pack and my clothing.

      I thought the Nupuri did a superb job during this trip. With 10 lbs (16.10 km) of food and water, the Nupuri carried my 25 lbs (11.34 kg) load easily and comfortably. The hip belt, while not as beefy as other similar sized packs, did not seem overwhelmed with this load and was very balanced and supportive. The shoulder straps were comfortable as well, although the pack did tend to “pull” a bit due to the lack of load lifter straps. The Dyneema material performed very well, resisting snags of any kind (unlike my clothing) and repelling the light moisture we received easily – I didn’t use any type of pack cover or liner during the hike, and none of my gear got wet during the two days. I appreciated the various pockets on the pack, and utilized the large front half-zip pocket to store my odor-proof food bag. The smaller front pocket held my maps well, while the hip belt pockets comfortable carried my GPS and digital camera.

      After the trip, I was surprised to find how easily the pack cleaned up. The continual light moisture we received created a very muddy environment to hike and camp in, and during the course of our time on the trail, the pack became considerably dirty. A simple wiping with a warm wash cloth was all it took to remove a majority of the dirt.

      Summary:
      Dislikes:
      As a total gear junkie, I constantly strive to find perfect equipment for every application. While I’ve been incredibly pleased with the Nupuri’s performance, I do think there are several areas that could be improved on.

      I have some slight criticism in Montbell’s use of the heavier Cordura in areas such as the lid and side pockets. As the Nupuri is intended to be a lightweight pack, I do not see a need for this level of reinforcement in these areas. Also, Montbell touts the Dyneema fabric as being stronger than Cordura, so I’m not sure why any Cordura is used on the Nupuri. By replacing the Cordura areas with Dyneema, I think the Nupuri would be a lighter and stronger pack overall.

      My second issue with the Nupuri is the lack of load-lifter straps. Overall the suspension on the pack is great, but the lack of load-lifters can make the pack “pull” backwards a bit while hiking with moderately heavy loads.

      Lastly, I’d like to see a hydration bladder sleeve and port incorporated into the pack. I tend to believe that hydration systems are ubiquitous these days, and do not see why such features are not built into the Nupuri.

      Likes:
      To me, the biggest selling point of the Nupuri is the incredible strength-to-weight ration. The Dyneema fabric has impressed me during every test I’ve put it through, from thick bushwhacking to rock climbing. After an entire summer of backpacking I have yet to rip or cut the material, and there is still absolutely no sign of abrasion – something I’ve never seen before after a season of use, especially from ultralight gear. I suspect this pack will hold up to years of abuse from rock climbing and bushwhacking.

      Also, I really appreciate the Nupuri’s intuitive, functional design as I always look for the simplest piece of gear to take care of a specific task. The pack’s not over-built with heavy, useless features, and everything included on the Nupuri has a beautiful, simple functionality. Montbell prides itself on the “function is beauty” philosophy, and the Nupuri is a clear illustration of this concept.

      In a nutshell:
      Montbell’s Nupuri 45 backpack is a nearly ideal piece of gear for those looking for a lightweight, mid-sized pack that’s significantly more durable than similar-weight competitors’ packs.



      ---------------------------------
      Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different. Just radically better.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • edwardripleyduggan
      Hello Tim, Thanks very much. You have generally done a good job with the conversions--thanks. Given that this is a pack review, and these can be tricky, you
      Message 2 of 11 , May 23 7:04 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello Tim,

        Thanks very much. You have generally done a good job with the
        conversions--thanks.

        Given that this is a pack review, and these can be tricky, you have
        done extremely well detailing the features and use characteristics.
        There are edits below, but they are not that numerous. Please
        incorporate these. I'd like you to upload a "test" version of the HTML
        to the folder at

        http://tinyurl.com/7p4t6

        You will need to log in to BGT first. A photo of the pack would be
        helpful (don't forget the ALT attribute on the image, or it won't load
        into the folder). I'd appreciate a "REPOST" of the corrected text to
        this list also, but (assuming the HTML is in good order) you are
        nearly complete on this review.

        Best,

        Ted

        BGT OR Editor



        >
        > Montbell Nupuri Pack 45

        EDIT: The firm is very inconsistent in its naming, even in its own
        literature, but BGT has settled on the "Mont Bell" version for the
        current test series we are doing for them. The title of the review
        should appear as

        Owner Review Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack

        Date: May [date of submission], 2006

        Please change the firm's name (use search and replace) where it
        appears in the report. This is no fault of yours!

        >
        > Tester
        > Name: Tim Streeb
        > Age: 26
        > Gender: Male
        > Height: 6' 1" (1.85 m)
        > Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
        > Email address: sole_bgt at yahoo dot com
        > City, State, Country: Denver, CO, USA
        > Date: 05/09/2006

        EDIT: Remove date from here

        >
        > Backpacking Background:
        > A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
        trail running and skiing all over the state. I started hiking and
        backpacking as part of my scouting curriculum and fell in love with
        the adventure, challenge and solitude of exploring the mountains. Now
        a weekend warrior, I get outside every weekend averaging 100 (161 km)
        miles of hiking per season.
        >
        > While I do consider myself a lightweight backpacker, I'm not what
        you'd consider an ultralighter. My base weight is typically 15lbs,
        (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I carry all the group gear. I am
        most definitely a gear junkie, and have spent countless hours reading
        reviews at BPGT.
        >
        > A majority of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado,
        although I have been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then.
        I also enjoy climbing peaks, and have hiked my fair share of Colorado
        14ers. Also, since I'm a huge skier, I enjoy winter hiking and
        ski-touring.

        EDIT: The bio section is intended to give a brief section of 100 words
        or less, intended to give the reader a sense of how closely your use
        matches their own. My suggestion (using the most relevant lines, taken
        from your text above):

        "A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
        trail running and skiing all over the state. I get outside every
        weekend averaging 100 (161 km) miles of hiking per season. A majority
        of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado, although I have
        been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then. I also enjoy
        climbing peaks, and I enjoy winter hiking and ski-touring. My base
        weight is typically 15 lbs, (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I
        carry all the group gear."

        You have a few extra words left (11) so you can elaborate on anything
        you feel needs it, but this really has all the information a reader
        requires to get a sense of your use.

        As an aside, the preferred abbreviation is lb, for single or plural,
        though you will see both versions (lb, lbs) on the site.


        >
        > While a majority of the pack is constructed with Dyneema, Montbell
        does use some heavy weight Cordura in areas highly susceptible to
        abrasions

        ### EDIT: "abrasion" [either is essentially correct, the singular more
        standard]

        , such as the bottom of the main pack body, side water bottle pockets
        and top of the lid.
        >
        > The pack's suspension is very basic. Rigidity is provided by a
        .25 in (0.64 cm) thick, removable foam frame sheet that's relatively
        flexible. Montbell notes that this frame sheet can be used as an
        emergency bivy pad, although I'm not confident this claim would serve
        useful in a real life application due to its very small size.

        ### EDIT: I'd suggest giving the frame sheet dimensions so the buyer
        can decide. Even a very small sheet of closed cell foam insulation can
        give some protection in an emergency bivy. I use a pack (Cold Cold
        World Valdez) which has a similar feature.

        >
        > As for bells and whistles, the Nupuri offers users a surprising
        amount of useful features for such a lightweight pack. In total, the
        Nupuri features 10 pockets – two on the hip belt, the main
        compartment, two Cordura water bottle pockets attached on each side of
        the main compartment, two smaller pockets attached to the front of the
        main pack body and a top lid comprised of 3 zippered pockets. The
        Montbell web site advertises the Nupuri as having "elasticized pockets
        and compression straps for skis of

        ### EDIT: "or"

        trekking poles (25, 45)

        ### EDIT: what units?

        ", although my pack does not have elasticized pockets suitable for
        carrying skis. This is most likely a typo on Montbell's site. One
        big drawback is the pack does not have a hydration bladder sleeve.
        >

        >
        > Field information
        > I used the Nupuri for a majority of my 2005 summer backpacking
        season. For the purposes of this report, I will reference the pack's
        performance during an 18 mile (28.98 km)

        ### EDIT: round up to 29 km

        overnight trip in Alaska on the Resurrection Trail in the Kenai
        National Wildlife Refuge. The Resurrection Trail is a relatively easy
        hike, as there's not a lot of elevation gain, the trail is maintained
        well and not very rocky. There were several water crossings along the
        trail, although they were very small streams with little potential for
        hazard. The weather over the course of our two day hike was overcast
        and foggy, with spells of light rain. The thick, overgrown temperate
        rain forest of the Kenai offered plenty of opportunities to attack and
        snag the pack, and also did an efficient job of transporting any
        moisture on leaves to the pack and my clothing.
        >
        > I thought the Nupuri did a superb job during this trip. With 10
        lbs (16.10 km)

        ### EDIT: (4.5 kg)

        of food and water, the Nupuri carried my 25 lbs (11.34 kg)

        ### EDIT: (11.3 kg)

        load easily and comfortably. The hip belt, while not as beefy as
        other similar sized packs, did not seem overwhelmed with this load and
        was very balanced and supportive. The shoulder straps were
        comfortable as well, although the pack did tend to "pull" a bit due to
        the lack of load lifter straps. The Dyneema material performed very
        well, resisting snags of any kind (unlike my clothing) and repelling

        ### EDIT: "repelled"

        the light moisture we received easily – I didn't use any type of pack
        cover or liner during the hike, and none of my gear got wet during the
        two days. I appreciated the various pockets on the pack, and utilized
        the large front half-zip pocket to store my odor-proof food bag. The
        smaller front pocket held my maps well, while the hip belt pockets
        comfortable carried my GPS and digital camera.


        >
        > I have some slight criticism in Montbell's use of the heavier
        Cordura in areas such as the lid and side pockets. As the Nupuri is
        intended to be a lightweight pack, I do not see a need for this level
        of reinforcement in these areas. Also, Montbell touts the Dyneema
        fabric as being stronger than Cordura, so I'm not sure why any Cordura
        is used on the Nupuri. By replacing the Cordura areas with Dyneema, I
        think the Nupuri would be a lighter and stronger pack overall.

        ### COMMENT: Dyneema is highly resistant to impact damage, in my
        experience. I have several packs that use it. It's also pretty good
        with abrasion, but (based on my experience) Cordura probably has an
        edge in that department. I'm not asking you to change this--it's a
        fair statement of opinion--just throwing in my two cents.



        >
        > My second issue with the Nupuri is the lack of load-lifter straps.
        Overall the suspension on the pack is great, but the lack of
        load-lifters can make the pack "pull" backwards a bit while hiking
        with moderately heavy loads.
        >
        > Lastly, I'd like to see a hydration bladder sleeve and port
        incorporated into the pack. I tend to believe that hydration systems
        are ubiquitous these days, and do not see why such features are not
        built into the Nupuri.
        >
        > Likes:
        > To me, the biggest selling point of the Nupuri is the incredible
        strength-to-weight ration. The Dyneema fabric has impressed me during
        every test I've put it through, from thick bushwhacking to rock
        climbing. After an entire summer of backpacking I have yet to rip or
        cut the material, and there is still absolutely no sign of abrasion –
        something I've never seen before after a season of use, especially
        from ultralight gear. I suspect this pack will hold up to years of
        abuse from rock climbing and bushwhacking.
        >
        > Also, I really appreciate the Nupuri's intuitive, functional
        design as I always look for the simplest piece of gear to take care of
        a specific task. The pack's not over-built with heavy, useless
        features, and everything included on the Nupuri has a beautiful,
        simple functionality. Montbell prides itself on the "function is
        beauty" philosophy, and the Nupuri is a clear illustration of this
        concept.
        >
        > In a nutshell:
        > Montbell's Nupuri 45 backpack is a nearly ideal piece of gear for
        those looking for a lightweight, mid-sized pack that's significantly
        more durable than similar-weight competitors' packs.

        EDIT: I may be being over-fussy here, but "that's significantly more
        durable than similar-weight competitors' packs." is both projecting a
        bit (unless you have tried all the competition), and it smacks of the
        "shoot-out" style of review. Just end the sentence with a period after
        "pack" and let the reader make the call based on what you have written.




        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different.
        Just radically better.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • edwardripleyduggan
        Tim--I failed to highlight a couple of edits with ###. One was the bio edit. Please keep your eyes open for these.
        Message 3 of 11 , May 23 7:08 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          Tim--I failed to highlight a couple of edits with ###. One was the bio
          edit. Please keep your eyes open for these.
        • Tim Streeb
          Thanks for your edits, Ted. They re very helpful and easy to understand. I m working on another draft of this OR now, and will submit the revised review and
          Message 4 of 11 , May 25 8:44 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for your edits, Ted. They're very helpful and easy to understand. I'm working on another draft of this OR now, and will submit the revised review and post an HTML version with photos in the next few days.

            Just wanted to keep you updated with my progress. Thanks again,

            Tim Streeb

            edwardripleyduggan <erd@...> wrote:
            Hello Tim,

            Thanks very much. You have generally done a good job with the
            conversions--thanks.

            Given that this is a pack review, and these can be tricky, you have
            done extremely well detailing the features and use characteristics.
            There are edits below, but they are not that numerous. Please
            incorporate these. I'd like you to upload a "test" version of the HTML
            to the folder at

            http://tinyurl.com/7p4t6

            You will need to log in to BGT first. A photo of the pack would be
            helpful (don't forget the ALT attribute on the image, or it won't load
            into the folder). I'd appreciate a "REPOST" of the corrected text to
            this list also, but (assuming the HTML is in good order) you are
            nearly complete on this review.

            Best,

            Ted

            BGT OR Editor



            >
            > Montbell Nupuri Pack 45

            EDIT: The firm is very inconsistent in its naming, even in its own
            literature, but BGT has settled on the "Mont Bell" version for the
            current test series we are doing for them. The title of the review
            should appear as

            Owner Review Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack

            Date: May [date of submission], 2006

            Please change the firm's name (use search and replace) where it
            appears in the report. This is no fault of yours!

            >
            > Tester
            > Name: Tim Streeb
            > Age: 26
            > Gender: Male
            > Height: 6' 1" (1.85 m)
            > Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
            > Email address: sole_bgt at yahoo dot com
            > City, State, Country: Denver, CO, USA
            > Date: 05/09/2006

            EDIT: Remove date from here

            >
            > Backpacking Background:
            > A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
            trail running and skiing all over the state. I started hiking and
            backpacking as part of my scouting curriculum and fell in love with
            the adventure, challenge and solitude of exploring the mountains. Now
            a weekend warrior, I get outside every weekend averaging 100 (161 km)
            miles of hiking per season.
            >
            > While I do consider myself a lightweight backpacker, I'm not what
            you'd consider an ultralighter. My base weight is typically 15lbs,
            (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I carry all the group gear. I am
            most definitely a gear junkie, and have spent countless hours reading
            reviews at BPGT.
            >
            > A majority of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado,
            although I have been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then.
            I also enjoy climbing peaks, and have hiked my fair share of Colorado
            14ers. Also, since I'm a huge skier, I enjoy winter hiking and
            ski-touring.

            EDIT: The bio section is intended to give a brief section of 100 words
            or less, intended to give the reader a sense of how closely your use
            matches their own. My suggestion (using the most relevant lines, taken
            from your text above):

            "A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
            trail running and skiing all over the state. I get outside every
            weekend averaging 100 (161 km) miles of hiking per season. A majority
            of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado, although I have
            been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then. I also enjoy
            climbing peaks, and I enjoy winter hiking and ski-touring. My base
            weight is typically 15 lbs, (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I
            carry all the group gear."

            You have a few extra words left (11) so you can elaborate on anything
            you feel needs it, but this really has all the information a reader
            requires to get a sense of your use.

            As an aside, the preferred abbreviation is lb, for single or plural,
            though you will see both versions (lb, lbs) on the site.


            >
            > While a majority of the pack is constructed with Dyneema, Montbell
            does use some heavy weight Cordura in areas highly susceptible to
            abrasions

            ### EDIT: "abrasion" [either is essentially correct, the singular more
            standard]

            , such as the bottom of the main pack body, side water bottle pockets
            and top of the lid.
            >
            > The pack's suspension is very basic. Rigidity is provided by a
            .25 in (0.64 cm) thick, removable foam frame sheet that's relatively
            flexible. Montbell notes that this frame sheet can be used as an
            emergency bivy pad, although I'm not confident this claim would serve
            useful in a real life application due to its very small size.

            ### EDIT: I'd suggest giving the frame sheet dimensions so the buyer
            can decide. Even a very small sheet of closed cell foam insulation can
            give some protection in an emergency bivy. I use a pack (Cold Cold
            World Valdez) which has a similar feature.

            >
            > As for bells and whistles, the Nupuri offers users a surprising
            amount of useful features for such a lightweight pack. In total, the
            Nupuri features 10 pockets – two on the hip belt, the main
            compartment, two Cordura water bottle pockets attached on each side of
            the main compartment, two smaller pockets attached to the front of the
            main pack body and a top lid comprised of 3 zippered pockets. The
            Montbell web site advertises the Nupuri as having "elasticized pockets
            and compression straps for skis of

            ### EDIT: "or"

            trekking poles (25, 45)

            ### EDIT: what units?

            ", although my pack does not have elasticized pockets suitable for
            carrying skis. This is most likely a typo on Montbell's site. One
            big drawback is the pack does not have a hydration bladder sleeve.
            >

            >
            > Field information
            > I used the Nupuri for a majority of my 2005 summer backpacking
            season. For the purposes of this report, I will reference the pack's
            performance during an 18 mile (28.98 km)

            ### EDIT: round up to 29 km

            overnight trip in Alaska on the Resurrection Trail in the Kenai
            National Wildlife Refuge. The Resurrection Trail is a relatively easy
            hike, as there's not a lot of elevation gain, the trail is maintained
            well and not very rocky. There were several water crossings along the
            trail, although they were very small streams with little potential for
            hazard. The weather over the course of our two day hike was overcast
            and foggy, with spells of light rain. The thick, overgrown temperate
            rain forest of the Kenai offered plenty of opportunities to attack and
            snag the pack, and also did an efficient job of transporting any
            moisture on leaves to the pack and my clothing.
            >
            > I thought the Nupuri did a superb job during this trip. With 10
            lbs (16.10 km)

            ### EDIT: (4.5 kg)

            of food and water, the Nupuri carried my 25 lbs (11.34 kg)

            ### EDIT: (11.3 kg)

            load easily and comfortably. The hip belt, while not as beefy as
            other similar sized packs, did not seem overwhelmed with this load and
            was very balanced and supportive. The shoulder straps were
            comfortable as well, although the pack did tend to "pull" a bit due to
            the lack of load lifter straps. The Dyneema material performed very
            well, resisting snags of any kind (unlike my clothing) and repelling

            ### EDIT: "repelled"

            the light moisture we received easily – I didn't use any type of pack
            cover or liner during the hike, and none of my gear got wet during the
            two days. I appreciated the various pockets on the pack, and utilized
            the large front half-zip pocket to store my odor-proof food bag. The
            smaller front pocket held my maps well, while the hip belt pockets
            comfortable carried my GPS and digital camera.


            >
            > I have some slight criticism in Montbell's use of the heavier
            Cordura in areas such as the lid and side pockets. As the Nupuri is
            intended to be a lightweight pack, I do not see a need for this level
            of reinforcement in these areas. Also, Montbell touts the Dyneema
            fabric as being stronger than Cordura, so I'm not sure why any Cordura
            is used on the Nupuri. By replacing the Cordura areas with Dyneema, I
            think the Nupuri would be a lighter and stronger pack overall.

            ### COMMENT: Dyneema is highly resistant to impact damage, in my
            experience. I have several packs that use it. It's also pretty good
            with abrasion, but (based on my experience) Cordura probably has an
            edge in that department. I'm not asking you to change this--it's a
            fair statement of opinion--just throwing in my two cents.



            >
            > My second issue with the Nupuri is the lack of load-lifter straps.
            Overall the suspension on the pack is great, but the lack of
            load-lifters can make the pack "pull" backwards a bit while hiking
            with moderately heavy loads.
            >
            > Lastly, I'd like to see a hydration bladder sleeve and port
            incorporated into the pack. I tend to believe that hydration systems
            are ubiquitous these days, and do not see why such features are not
            built into the Nupuri.
            >
            > Likes:
            > To me, the biggest selling point of the Nupuri is the incredible
            strength-to-weight ration. The Dyneema fabric has impressed me during
            every test I've put it through, from thick bushwhacking to rock
            climbing. After an entire summer of backpacking I have yet to rip or
            cut the material, and there is still absolutely no sign of abrasion –
            something I've never seen before after a season of use, especially
            from ultralight gear. I suspect this pack will hold up to years of
            abuse from rock climbing and bushwhacking.
            >
            > Also, I really appreciate the Nupuri's intuitive, functional
            design as I always look for the simplest piece of gear to take care of
            a specific task. The pack's not over-built with heavy, useless
            features, and everything included on the Nupuri has a beautiful,
            simple functionality. Montbell prides itself on the "function is
            beauty" philosophy, and the Nupuri is a clear illustration of this
            concept.
            >
            > In a nutshell:
            > Montbell's Nupuri 45 backpack is a nearly ideal piece of gear for
            those looking for a lightweight, mid-sized pack that's significantly
            more durable than similar-weight competitors' packs.

            EDIT: I may be being over-fussy here, but "that's significantly more
            durable than similar-weight competitors' packs." is both projecting a
            bit (unless you have tried all the competition), and it smacks of the
            "shoot-out" style of review. Just end the sentence with a period after
            "pack" and let the reader make the call based on what you have written.




            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different.
            Just radically better.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >







            To read our reviews, please visit http://www.backpackgeartest.org/



            SPONSORED LINKS
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          • Tim Streeb
            Hi Ted, Below is a repost of my owner review of the Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack. I ve incorporated all of your comments and edits, and will be uploading an
            Message 5 of 11 , May 30 12:10 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Ted,

              Below is a repost of my owner review of the Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack. I've incorporated all of your comments and edits, and will be uploading an HTML version with pictures to the test folder shortly.

              Thanks again for all your help, and please let me know what next steps need to be taken after I post the HTML version.

              - Tim Streeb

              Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack

              Date of Submission:

              Tester
              Name: Tim Streeb
              Age: 26
              Gender: Male
              Height: 6’ 1” (1.85 m)
              Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
              Email address: sole_bgt at yahoo dot com
              City, State, Country: Denver, CO, USA

              Backpacking Background:
              A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing, trail running and skiing all over the state. I get outside every weekend averaging 100 (161 km) miles of hiking per season. A majority of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado, although I have been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then. I also enjoy climbing peaks, and I enjoy winter hiking and ski-touring. My base weight is typically 15 lbs, (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I carry all the group gear."

              Product information:
              a. Manufacturer: Mont Bell
              b. Year of manufacture: 2005
              c. URL: www.montbell.com
              d. Listed weight 3 lbs 1.6 oz (1.41 kg)
              e. Weight as delivered. 2 lbs 15.5 oz (1.35 kg)
              f. Price: (US) $159

              Product description.
              The Mont Bell Nupuri 45 is a 2750 cubic inch (45 liter) ultralight backpack intended for multi-day backpacking and climbing trips. The name “Nupuri” means “mountain” in Ainu, the language of the native people living in the Japanese archipelago and the Kuril Islands. The Nupuri 45 (referred to simply as “Nupuri” for this report) is the largest of three packs in Mont Bell’s Nupuri product line, as the company also offers very similar 25 liter and 35 liter packs.
              A majority of the Nupuri is constructed out of Dyneema® ripstop nylon, a lightweight checkered fabric that is highly resistant to tears and lightweight. The pack comes in one basic color – dark blue – and I was informed by a Mont Bell sales associate that this was the only color Dyneema fabric is made in (I have my doubts regarding the accuracy of this claim, but I digress). Dyneema is the same material used in many rock climbing products (slings, lightweight harnesses, etc.) as it’s incredibly strong. From the Mont Bell web site:

              “Dyneema is a super-strong polyethylene fiber produced using a patented gel spinning process. This remarkable fiber is up to 15 times stronger than steel and, weight-for-weight, is 40% stronger than competing aramid fibers. It has high energy absorption and low elongation. Dyneema floats on water, and is extremely resistant to abrasion, moisture, UV rays and chemicals. As a result, it has an almost unlimited range of applications, providing maximum strength and security for minimum weight.”

              While a majority of the pack is constructed with Dyneema, Mont Bell does use some heavy weight Cordura in areas highly susceptible to abrasion, such as the bottom of the main pack body, side water bottle pockets and top of the lid.

              The pack’s suspension is very basic. Rigidity is provided by a 22 in (56 cm) by 10 in (25.40 cm) by .25 in (0.64 cm) thick, removable foam frame sheet that’s relatively flexible, and Mont Bell notes that this frame sheet can be used as an emergency bivy pad. The Nupuri features a padded hip belt and back panel, and anatomically curved, padded shoulder straps with chest strap. One important suspension item to note is that the Nupuri does not have any load lifter straps.

              As for bells and whistles, the Nupuri offers users a surprising amount of useful features for such a lightweight pack. In total, the Nupuri features 10 pockets – two on the hip belt, the main compartment, two Cordura water bottle pockets attached on each side of the main compartment, two smaller pockets attached to the front of the main pack body and a top lid comprised of 3 zippered pockets. The Mont Bell web site advertises the Nupuri as having “elasticized pockets and compression straps for skis or trekking poles”, although my pack does not have elasticized pockets suitable for carrying skis. This is most likely a typo on Mont Bell’s site. One big drawback is the pack does not have a hydration bladder sleeve.

              Four side compression straps are used to secure loads, in addition to two trekking pole or ice ax loops with corresponding attachment points. There’s an additional compression strap under the pack’s lid, which I believe is intended to secure climbing ropes. There are also two additional compression straps running vertically on the top of the pack lid, offering additional attachment points for other gear or clothing.

              The Nupuri’s main compartment is top loading, and features a relatively large extension collar with two toggled draw cords. On each side of the main compartment, in-between the side compression straps, the Nupuri has zippered openings intended to allow the user additional access to the pack’s contents. The pack lid is sewn directly onto the main compartment and is not adjustable.

              Field information
              I used the Nupuri for a majority of my 2005 summer backpacking season. For the purposes of this report, I will reference the pack’s performance during an 18 mile (29 km) overnight trip in Alaska on the Resurrection Trail in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. The Resurrection Trail is a relatively easy hike, as there’s not a lot of elevation gain, the trail is maintained well and not very rocky. There were several water crossings along the trail, although they were very small streams with little potential for hazard. The weather over the course of our two day hike was overcast and foggy, with spells of light rain. The thick, overgrown temperate rain forest of the Kenai offered plenty of opportunities to attack and snag the pack, and also did an efficient job of transporting any moisture on leaves to the pack and my clothing.

              I thought the Nupuri did a superb job during this trip. With 10 lbs (4.5 kg) of food and water, the Nupuri carried my 25 lbs (11.3 kg) load easily and comfortably. The hip belt, while not as beefy as other similar sized packs, did not seem overwhelmed with this load and was very balanced and supportive. The shoulder straps were comfortable as well, although the pack did tend to “pull” a bit due to the lack of load lifter straps. The Dyneema material performed very well, resisting snags of any kind (unlike my clothing) and repelled the light moisture we received easily – I didn’t use any type of pack cover or liner during the hike, and none of my gear got wet during the two days. I appreciated the various pockets on the pack, and utilized the large front half-zip pocket to store my odor-proof food bag. The smaller front pocket held my maps well, while the hip belt pockets comfortable carried my GPS and digital camera.

              After the trip, I was surprised to find how easily the pack cleaned up. The continual light moisture we received created a very muddy environment to hike and camp in, and during the course of our time on the trail, the pack became considerably dirty. A simple wiping with a warm wash cloth was all it took to remove a majority of the dirt.

              Summary:
              Dislikes:
              As a total gear junkie, I constantly strive to find perfect equipment for every application. While I’ve been incredibly pleased with the Nupuri’s performance, I do think there are several areas that could be improved on.

              I have some slight criticism in Mont Bell’s use of the heavier Cordura in areas such as the lid and side pockets. As the Nupuri is intended to be a lightweight pack and already uses the very strong Dyneema fabric for a majority of the pack, I do not see a need for this level of reinforcement (and thus weight) in these areas.

              My second issue with the Nupuri is the lack of load-lifter straps. Overall the suspension on the pack is great, but the lack of load-lifters can make the pack “pull” backwards a bit while hiking with moderately heavy loads.

              Lastly, I’d like to see a hydration bladder sleeve and port incorporated into the pack. I tend to believe that hydration systems are ubiquitous these days, and do not see why such features are not built into the Nupuri.

              Likes:
              To me, the biggest selling point of the Nupuri is the incredible strength-to-weight ration. The Dyneema fabric has impressed me during every test I’ve put it through, from thick bushwhacking to rock climbing. After an entire summer of backpacking I have yet to rip or cut the material, and there is still absolutely no sign of abrasion – something I’ve never seen before after a season of use, especially from ultralight gear. I suspect this pack will hold up to years of abuse from rock climbing and bushwhacking.

              Also, I really appreciate the Nupuri’s intuitive, functional design as I always look for the simplest piece of gear to take care of a specific task. The pack’s not over-built with heavy, useless features, and everything included on the Nupuri has a beautiful, simple functionality. Mont Bell prides itself on the “function is beauty” philosophy, and the Nupuri is a clear illustration of this concept.

              In a nutshell:
              Mont Bell’s Nupuri 45 backpack is a nearly ideal piece of gear for those looking for a durable and lightweight mid-sized pack.





              ---------------------------------
              Do you Yahoo!?
              Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Tim Streeb
              Hi Ted, Just a quick follow up - I posted my HTML owner review with working images to the test folder you specified below. What are the next steps? Do I post
              Message 6 of 11 , May 30 8:27 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Ted,

                Just a quick follow up - I posted my HTML owner review with working images to the test folder you specified below. What are the next steps? Do I post my review to a public folder? Am I finished with this review, or do I need some sort of final approval?

                Thanks, Ted. As always, I appreciate your help!

                - Tim Streeb

                edwardripleyduggan <erd@...> wrote:
                Hello Tim,

                Thanks very much. You have generally done a good job with the
                conversions--thanks.

                Given that this is a pack review, and these can be tricky, you have
                done extremely well detailing the features and use characteristics.
                There are edits below, but they are not that numerous. Please
                incorporate these. I'd like you to upload a "test" version of the HTML
                to the folder at

                http://tinyurl.com/7p4t6

                You will need to log in to BGT first. A photo of the pack would be
                helpful (don't forget the ALT attribute on the image, or it won't load
                into the folder). I'd appreciate a "REPOST" of the corrected text to
                this list also, but (assuming the HTML is in good order) you are
                nearly complete on this review.

                Best,

                Ted

                BGT OR Editor



                >
                > Montbell Nupuri Pack 45

                EDIT: The firm is very inconsistent in its naming, even in its own
                literature, but BGT has settled on the "Mont Bell" version for the
                current test series we are doing for them. The title of the review
                should appear as

                Owner Review Mont Bell Nupuri 45 Backpack

                Date: May [date of submission], 2006

                Please change the firm's name (use search and replace) where it
                appears in the report. This is no fault of yours!

                >
                > Tester
                > Name: Tim Streeb
                > Age: 26
                > Gender: Male
                > Height: 6' 1" (1.85 m)
                > Weight: 190 lbs (86 kg)
                > Email address: sole_bgt at yahoo dot com
                > City, State, Country: Denver, CO, USA
                > Date: 05/09/2006

                EDIT: Remove date from here

                >
                > Backpacking Background:
                > A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
                trail running and skiing all over the state. I started hiking and
                backpacking as part of my scouting curriculum and fell in love with
                the adventure, challenge and solitude of exploring the mountains. Now
                a weekend warrior, I get outside every weekend averaging 100 (161 km)
                miles of hiking per season.
                >
                > While I do consider myself a lightweight backpacker, I'm not what
                you'd consider an ultralighter. My base weight is typically 15lbs,
                (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I carry all the group gear. I am
                most definitely a gear junkie, and have spent countless hours reading
                reviews at BPGT.
                >
                > A majority of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado,
                although I have been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then.
                I also enjoy climbing peaks, and have hiked my fair share of Colorado
                14ers. Also, since I'm a huge skier, I enjoy winter hiking and
                ski-touring.

                EDIT: The bio section is intended to give a brief section of 100 words
                or less, intended to give the reader a sense of how closely your use
                matches their own. My suggestion (using the most relevant lines, taken
                from your text above):

                "A native of Colorado, I've grown up hiking, backpacking, climbing,
                trail running and skiing all over the state. I get outside every
                weekend averaging 100 (161 km) miles of hiking per season. A majority
                of my hiking is done at high elevation in Colorado, although I have
                been known to do a few extravagant trips now and then. I also enjoy
                climbing peaks, and I enjoy winter hiking and ski-touring. My base
                weight is typically 15 lbs, (6.80 kg) but that's usually because I
                carry all the group gear."

                You have a few extra words left (11) so you can elaborate on anything
                you feel needs it, but this really has all the information a reader
                requires to get a sense of your use.

                As an aside, the preferred abbreviation is lb, for single or plural,
                though you will see both versions (lb, lbs) on the site.


                >
                > While a majority of the pack is constructed with Dyneema, Montbell
                does use some heavy weight Cordura in areas highly susceptible to
                abrasions

                ### EDIT: "abrasion" [either is essentially correct, the singular more
                standard]

                , such as the bottom of the main pack body, side water bottle pockets
                and top of the lid.
                >
                > The pack's suspension is very basic. Rigidity is provided by a
                .25 in (0.64 cm) thick, removable foam frame sheet that's relatively
                flexible. Montbell notes that this frame sheet can be used as an
                emergency bivy pad, although I'm not confident this claim would serve
                useful in a real life application due to its very small size.

                ### EDIT: I'd suggest giving the frame sheet dimensions so the buyer
                can decide. Even a very small sheet of closed cell foam insulation can
                give some protection in an emergency bivy. I use a pack (Cold Cold
                World Valdez) which has a similar feature.

                >
                > As for bells and whistles, the Nupuri offers users a surprising
                amount of useful features for such a lightweight pack. In total, the
                Nupuri features 10 pockets – two on the hip belt, the main
                compartment, two Cordura water bottle pockets attached on each side of
                the main compartment, two smaller pockets attached to the front of the
                main pack body and a top lid comprised of 3 zippered pockets. The
                Montbell web site advertises the Nupuri as having "elasticized pockets
                and compression straps for skis of

                ### EDIT: "or"

                trekking poles (25, 45)

                ### EDIT: what units?

                ", although my pack does not have elasticized pockets suitable for
                carrying skis. This is most likely a typo on Montbell's site. One
                big drawback is the pack does not have a hydration bladder sleeve.
                >

                >
                > Field information
                > I used the Nupuri for a majority of my 2005 summer backpacking
                season. For the purposes of this report, I will reference the pack's
                performance during an 18 mile (28.98 km)

                ### EDIT: round up to 29 km

                overnight trip in Alaska on the Resurrection Trail in the Kenai
                National Wildlife Refuge. The Resurrection Trail is a relatively easy
                hike, as there's not a lot of elevation gain, the trail is maintained
                well and not very rocky. There were several water crossings along the
                trail, although they were very small streams with little potential for
                hazard. The weather over the course of our two day hike was overcast
                and foggy, with spells of light rain. The thick, overgrown temperate
                rain forest of the Kenai offered plenty of opportunities to attack and
                snag the pack, and also did an efficient job of transporting any
                moisture on leaves to the pack and my clothing.
                >
                > I thought the Nupuri did a superb job during this trip. With 10
                lbs (16.10 km)

                ### EDIT: (4.5 kg)

                of food and water, the Nupuri carried my 25 lbs (11.34 kg)

                ### EDIT: (11.3 kg)

                load easily and comfortably. The hip belt, while not as beefy as
                other similar sized packs, did not seem overwhelmed with this load and
                was very balanced and supportive. The shoulder straps were
                comfortable as well, although the pack did tend to "pull" a bit due to
                the lack of load lifter straps. The Dyneema material performed very
                well, resisting snags of any kind (unlike my clothing) and repelling

                ### EDIT: "repelled"

                the light moisture we received easily – I didn't use any type of pack
                cover or liner during the hike, and none of my gear got wet during the
                two days. I appreciated the various pockets on the pack, and utilized
                the large front half-zip pocket to store my odor-proof food bag. The
                smaller front pocket held my maps well, while the hip belt pockets
                comfortable carried my GPS and digital camera.


                >
                > I have some slight criticism in Montbell's use of the heavier
                Cordura in areas such as the lid and side pockets. As the Nupuri is
                intended to be a lightweight pack, I do not see a need for this level
                of reinforcement in these areas. Also, Montbell touts the Dyneema
                fabric as being stronger than Cordura, so I'm not sure why any Cordura
                is used on the Nupuri. By replacing the Cordura areas with Dyneema, I
                think the Nupuri would be a lighter and stronger pack overall.

                ### COMMENT: Dyneema is highly resistant to impact damage, in my
                experience. I have several packs that use it. It's also pretty good
                with abrasion, but (based on my experience) Cordura probably has an
                edge in that department. I'm not asking you to change this--it's a
                fair statement of opinion--just throwing in my two cents.



                >
                > My second issue with the Nupuri is the lack of load-lifter straps.
                Overall the suspension on the pack is great, but the lack of
                load-lifters can make the pack "pull" backwards a bit while hiking
                with moderately heavy loads.
                >
                > Lastly, I'd like to see a hydration bladder sleeve and port
                incorporated into the pack. I tend to believe that hydration systems
                are ubiquitous these days, and do not see why such features are not
                built into the Nupuri.
                >
                > Likes:
                > To me, the biggest selling point of the Nupuri is the incredible
                strength-to-weight ration. The Dyneema fabric has impressed me during
                every test I've put it through, from thick bushwhacking to rock
                climbing. After an entire summer of backpacking I have yet to rip or
                cut the material, and there is still absolutely no sign of abrasion –
                something I've never seen before after a season of use, especially
                from ultralight gear. I suspect this pack will hold up to years of
                abuse from rock climbing and bushwhacking.
                >
                > Also, I really appreciate the Nupuri's intuitive, functional
                design as I always look for the simplest piece of gear to take care of
                a specific task. The pack's not over-built with heavy, useless
                features, and everything included on the Nupuri has a beautiful,
                simple functionality. Montbell prides itself on the "function is
                beauty" philosophy, and the Nupuri is a clear illustration of this
                concept.
                >
                > In a nutshell:
                > Montbell's Nupuri 45 backpack is a nearly ideal piece of gear for
                those looking for a lightweight, mid-sized pack that's significantly
                more durable than similar-weight competitors' packs.

                EDIT: I may be being over-fussy here, but "that's significantly more
                durable than similar-weight competitors' packs." is both projecting a
                bit (unless you have tried all the competition), and it smacks of the
                "shoot-out" style of review. Just end the sentence with a period after
                "pack" and let the reader make the call based on what you have written.




                >
                >
                >
                > ---------------------------------
                > Sneak preview the all-new Yahoo.com. It's not radically different.
                Just radically better.
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >







                To read our reviews, please visit http://www.backpackgeartest.org/



                SPONSORED LINKS
                Survival guide High Hiking Tester Alaska hiking Alaska outdoors

                ---------------------------------
                YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


                Visit your group "BackpackGearTest" on the web.

                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                BackpackGearTest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                ---------------------------------




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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • edwardripleyduggan
                Hello Tim, Thanks very much. I was waiting for the HTML version, which looks good. My only edits are to ask you to change Date of Submission: 5-30-2006 to a
                Message 7 of 11 , May 31 6:08 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hello Tim,

                  Thanks very much. I was waiting for the HTML version, which looks
                  good. My only edits are to ask you to change "Date of Submission:
                  5-30-2006" to a simple "Review Date: 5-30-2006."

                  Also, take a look at your link to the Montbell site, which currently
                  points back to the OR. It's showing as
                  "http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/Mont%20Bell%20Nupuri%2045%20Backpack/www.montbell.com"
                  rather than "www.montbell.com." Easily fixed.

                  Otherwise you are in great shape. Once those two small edits are done,
                  please upload to:

                  http://tinyurl.com/o8upn

                  and you will be all set. Please remember to mark the "Owner Review"
                  button.

                  Thanks for your co-operation. I think this is an excellent first OR
                  and I look forward to seeing your next.

                  Best,

                  Ted.


                  --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Tim Streeb <sole_bgt@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Ted,
                  >
                  > Just a quick follow up - I posted my HTML owner review with
                  working images to the test folder you specified below. What are the
                  next steps? Do I post my review to a public folder? Am I finished
                  with this review, or do I need some sort of final approval?
                  >
                  > Thanks, Ted. As always, I appreciate your help!
                  >
                  > - Tim Streeb
                  >
                • Tim Streeb
                  Awesome! I went ahead and posted the corrected HTML to the folder below. Thanks again for all your help, Ted! As a lifetime backpacker, gear junkie and
                  Message 8 of 11 , May 31 9:51 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Awesome! I went ahead and posted the corrected HTML to the folder below. Thanks again for all your help, Ted! As a lifetime backpacker, gear junkie and writer by profession, BGT is the perfect venue for me to contribute to the greater community. I'm super excited to have my first review posted and look forward to submitting many more.

                    Thanks again! My second OR will be posted shortly.

                    - Tim Streeb

                    edwardripleyduggan <erd@...> wrote:
                    Hello Tim,

                    Thanks very much. I was waiting for the HTML version, which looks
                    good. My only edits are to ask you to change "Date of Submission:
                    5-30-2006" to a simple "Review Date: 5-30-2006."

                    Also, take a look at your link to the Montbell site, which currently
                    points back to the OR. It's showing as
                    "http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/Mont%20Bell%20Nupuri%2045%20Backpack/www.montbell.com"
                    rather than "www.montbell.com." Easily fixed.

                    Otherwise you are in great shape. Once those two small edits are done,
                    please upload to:

                    http://tinyurl.com/o8upn

                    and you will be all set. Please remember to mark the "Owner Review"
                    button.

                    Thanks for your co-operation. I think this is an excellent first OR
                    and I look forward to seeing your next.

                    Best,

                    Ted.


                    --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Tim Streeb <sole_bgt@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Ted,
                    >
                    > Just a quick follow up - I posted my HTML owner review with
                    working images to the test folder you specified below. What are the
                    next steps? Do I post my review to a public folder? Am I finished
                    with this review, or do I need some sort of final approval?
                    >
                    > Thanks, Ted. As always, I appreciate your help!
                    >
                    > - Tim Streeb
                    >





                    To read our reviews, please visit http://www.backpackgeartest.org/



                    SPONSORED LINKS
                    Survival guide High Hiking Tester Alaska hiking Alaska outdoors

                    ---------------------------------
                    YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


                    Visit your group "BackpackGearTest" on the web.

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    BackpackGearTest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


                    ---------------------------------





                    ---------------------------------
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail Beta.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • edwardripleyduggan
                    Tim -- a pleasure. Final HTML version looks good. We re glad to have you on board. I like much of M B s gear myself, though I have yet to try a pack. Best,
                    Message 9 of 11 , May 31 11:27 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Tim -- a pleasure. Final HTML version looks good. We're glad to have
                      you on board. I like much of M B's gear myself, though I have yet to
                      try a pack.

                      Best,

                      Ted.

                      --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Tim Streeb <sole_bgt@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Awesome! I went ahead and posted the corrected HTML to the folder
                      below. Thanks again for all your help, Ted! As a lifetime
                      backpacker, gear junkie and writer by profession, BGT is the perfect
                      venue for me to contribute to the greater community. I'm super
                      excited to have my first review posted and look forward to submitting
                      many more.
                      >
                      > Thanks again! My second OR will be posted shortly.
                      >
                      > - Tim Streeb
                      >
                    • Roger Caffin
                      ... Actually, could you make that either May-30, 2006 or 30-May-3006, as many of us use a different date format and get confused over which is month and which
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 1, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        > My only edits are to ask you to change "Date of Submission:
                        > 5-30-2006" to a simple "Review Date: 5-30-2006."

                        Actually, could you make that either May-30, 2006 or 30-May-3006, as many of us use a different date format and get
                        confused over which is month and which is day. Spelling out the month sorts that out completely. (OK, no confusion in
                        this case, obviously).

                        Cheers
                        Roger Caffin
                        BGT Editor
                      • Andrew Priest
                        ... Oh now, another writer :-) Andrew
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 1, 2006
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                          At 12:51 AM 1/06/2006, you wrote:
                          >Awesome! I went ahead and posted the corrected HTML to the folder
                          >below. Thanks again for all your help, Ted! As a lifetime
                          >backpacker, gear junkie and writer by profession,

                          Oh now, another writer :-)

                          Andrew
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