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REPOST: OWNER REVIEW - Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight Stove. Comments follow

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  • David H
    Ted, I have the HTML of this, but not sure where to upload this to, or how... Owner Review. Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight Stove Review Date: February 12 2006
    Message 1 of 20 , Mar 2 10:57 AM
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      Ted,

      I have the HTML of this, but not sure where to upload this to, or how...

      Owner Review. Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight Stove
      Review Date: February 12 2006

      • Dave Hostetler
      • 37
      • Male
      • 6' 0" (183 cm)
      • 270 lbs (122 kg)
      • Dbhost-at-mylinuxisp.com
      • League City, Texas (U.S.A.)

      My backpacking started in the scouts, and has been an important part
      of my life since my introduction to it in 1980. Living in Texas with
      an uncooperative spouse made going places to go backpacking difficult.
      Changes in that status have gotten me back on the trails. I consider
      myself a mid weight backpacker, but some definitions fluctuate. My
      base pack weight averages 19 lbs (8.62 kg). My camping experience
      includes camping from the car, canoe camping, and backpacking.

      Product information
      • Manufacturer. Coleman
      • Year of Manufacture. 2005
      • Manufacturer URL. www.coleman.com
      • Weight as claimed by manufacturer. 2.7 oz (77 g).
      • Weight as tested. 2.4 oz (68 g) including stuff sack.

      Physical Description.
      • Stove height (approx) 3.25 in (8.25 cm).
      • Stove width folded (approx) 3 in (7.6 cm).
      • Pot support span 4 in (10.1 cm).
      • Stove height assembled to recommended fuel canister. 6.5 in (16.5
      cm).

      The stove is a simple screw down burner design, atop folding legs,
      atop a small valve / venturi assembly. The fuel control knob is a
      simple wire loop controlling a knob. The whole thing is made from what
      appears to be aluminum, stainless steel, brass, and plastic. Included
      is a small, nylon stuff sack with drawstring and cord lock.

      MSRP: $39.99 US

      Field information
      • Locations of testing. Crater Lake Oregon, Willamette National
      Forest Oregon, Lake Somerville Trailway Texas.
      • Elevations and brief description of testing locations. Crater
      Lake Elevation 8900 ft (2713 m). Wooded mountain, relatively
      challenging trails, never quite got warm. Willamette National Forest
      Elevation (guesstimate) 5000 ft (1524 m). Wooded mountain, mildly
      challenging trails, daytime highs in the low 90s (50 C), warm, but not
      humid. Lake Somerville Elevation Ranges 190 – 496 ft (58 m – 151 m)
      above mean sea level. Easy trails posing little to no challenge beyond
      muddy conditions, and alligators, daytime highs in the upper 90s (50
      C), hot and humid, stove needed very little due to lack of desire for
      anything hot.
      • Crater Lake camping conditions overnight low below freezing,
      light snow. Willamette National Forest camping conditions overnight
      lows low 50s (10 C) clear skies. Lake Somerville camping conditions.
      Overnight lows in the low 70s (21 C), overcast, humid.

      Review of the Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight

      After years of swearing I would never use another stove in favor
      of my old MSR Whisperlite, my aging back won out the argument of
      whether buy lighter gear or not. While the Whisperlite is far from a
      heavy stove, and it has some notable advantages over the canister
      stoves, I chose a canister stove in order to lighten my load, and
      improve the ability to simmer. I read all the reviews I could find,
      borrowed as many stoves as I could, and annoyed the sales staff at all
      the backpacking shops to get information on the various models of
      stoves. And I boiled it down to a Butane / Propane mix burning
      canister stove. But the question was which one?

      Well since I was going for light weight, the lightest advertised
      weight I could find was the Coleman Exponent F1 Ultralight. That is at
      least for a stove that had a controllable, adjustable flame (soda can
      stoves are lighter). The stove's advertised 2.7 oz is feather light.
      There were a fair number of worthy competitors in this market niche,
      all offering light weight, low price, and good performance, however
      the Coleman won out on the factor of weight alone. The Exponent F1
      Ultralight was simply the lightest model I could find.

      I was pleasantly surprised at the fact that the actual delivered
      product weighed less than advertised. In backpacking gear this is
      rarely the case.

      In my efforts stove reviewing efforts, I "test fitted" pots to
      various stoves, and found no issues with the Coleman not supporting
      pots, or being wobbly with most pots. However there are some pot
      designs that have a recessed bottom that don't fit this stove
      particularly well. Test fitting the pot a user may either have, or
      will buy, to the stove is important for insuring pot / stove stability.

      Setting the stove up for its initial trial run prior to taking it
      out on the trail at home, I set it up on the back deck, and boiled a
      quart (.95 l) of water in my old American Camper backpackers Stainless
      1L cook pot. Time to boil, while not measured did seem quite rapid.

      Setting the stove up is somewhat awkward the first time it is
      done. The burner head has to be backed off 1 to 2 turns before the pot
      supports can be rotated into position. Once the pot supports are in
      place, the burner head is then tightened down to hold the pot supports
      in place. With the stove assembled, but not on the fuel cylinder, both
      the fuel cylinder, and stove connection should be inspected for debris
      or damage to insure safety. Screw the stove to the cylinder snugly,
      set the assembly down, strike a match, and turn the gas on, and the
      stove comes to life. One item this stove does lack, that impacts its
      usability is a piezo igniter. This can be a positive or a negative.
      Matches, or a lighter must be carried to ignite the gas. And there is
      no added weight, or added complexity or point of failure of the piezo
      igniter.

      The setup was fast and simple. As was the boil time. I honestly
      think the time to boil a liter of water was identical to the white gas
      stove. There was no pre-heating, pumping, or complicated assembly
      involved. During testing, some cold weather startup issues were noted
      as the temperatures dropped below the freezing point, and the winds
      picked up. This behavior was easily overcome by simply turning up the
      control valve a little further than usual.

      Cold temperatures did not seem to impact the way the stove worked, but
      the breeze / wind definitely had an impact on this stove, and made it
      painfully obvious that it had no wind screen.

      What I liked.
      1. Light weight. This is the lightest canister stove I have come
      across yet.
      2. Low Cost.
      3. Ease of use.
      4. Ability to go from extremely low simmer to flamethrower.
      5. Quality of construction. This thing is built really well for
      something so tiny and light.
      6. Pot stability with wider pots than competing stoves due to a
      wider support footprint.
      7. Exceptionally easy to set up and get working in mild to hot
      weather.

      What I disliked.
      1. The finish quickly oxidized after the first use. By the time I
      got back from Oregon, there was a coat of dull aluminum rust on what
      had been polished aluminum. Sealing the surface of the product would
      be a good quality control improvement. However this is a functional
      object, not an art object… No biggie.
      2. I alluded to this earlier, the pot rests are just the wrong
      size for certain pot designs. It is important to match the cook pot to
      the stove pot supports.
      3. Less than obvious setup procedure. Once the user sets it up,
      it is obvious, but the instruction sheet leaves a good deal to be desired.
      4. Lack of windscreen. I am not sure how they could make a
      windscreen for this without taking a chance at overheating and blowing
      up a cylinder, but I bet it could be done. And without adding much weight.

      Summary-
      The stove worked exceptionally well in all conditions except sub
      freezing and windy, and even at that a bit of fussing made it roar to
      life. Fuel cylinders are not readily available in the Houston Texas
      area, and have only been seen by me, or reported to me as being
      available at Oshman's, REI, and several area Wal-Marts. I have never
      seen them at Gander Mountain, but have been told the canisters are
      available there. I have had it reported to me that fuel is much more
      common outside of TX. I did see the fuel cylinders just about
      everywhere I looked when I was in Oregon, campground stores, gas
      stations, discount stores etc… The poor cold weather ignition
      performance of this stove I do not believe was indicative of a flaw
      with this stove, but rather canister stoves in general. I will not be
      parting ways with my trusty old Whisperlite for trips up north during
      cooler times of year, however I look forward to years of enjoyment of
      this stove at lower elevations and warmer temps. This is the stove I
      wish I had owned in Arizona!
    • edwardripleyduggan
      David, Go to the BGT website, http://www.backpackgeartest.org/ If you have previously registered, log-in. If you have not, then register (top two links in menu
      Message 2 of 20 , Mar 2 12:06 PM
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        David,

        Go to the BGT website,

        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/

        If you have previously registered, log-in. If you have not, then
        register (top two links in menu on left).

        Go to

        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/

        This is "Owner Reviews" if you are browsing the category menu after
        log-in.

        Click "Upload File" in top yellow bar.

        Follow the directions from there (clicking the "Browse" button will
        let you indicate the path to your HTM or HTML file).

        BTW, final upload after approval is by exactly the same process,
        except that you need to click the "Owner Review" button to indicate
        the type of upload.

        Please let me know on this list when this is up, and I'll look it over.

        Ted.
      • edwardripleyduggan
        Hi Dave, You are in good shape on the HTML, except that the Coleman link needs to be made clickable (to the URL indicated in your text, please, not the
        Message 3 of 20 , Mar 3 8:34 AM
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          Hi Dave,

          You are in good shape on the HTML, except that the Coleman link needs
          to be made clickable (to the URL indicated in your text, please, not
          the redirect to home.asp that the Coleman site defaults to--we always
          link to the main page, as redirects can change). Once you have done
          that, you may upload to

          http://tinyurl.com/rf9xt

          Don't forget to mark the "Owner Review" radio button.

          Pleasant working with you. I look forward to seeing your next OR.

          Best

          Ted
        • edwardripleyduggan
          Dave--not a big deal, but propane and butane are still capitalized in the HTML. Truly, these are don t need capitalizing. It doesn t interfere with your
          Message 4 of 20 , Mar 3 9:00 AM
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            Dave--not a big deal, but propane and butane are still capitalized in
            the HTML. Truly, these are don't need capitalizing. It doesn't
            interfere with your meaning, and if you are more comfortable with them
            that way, that's ultimately OK by me. However, it is, strictly
            speaking, incorrect. If they were trade names, that would be a
            different story, e.g. Velcro, Flagyl (to take two at random) but
            chemical names are no different from any other noun in taking lower
            case when in the body of a sentence.

            Ted.
          • David H
            Ted, The changes you asked for have been included in the HTML, and the new file has been uploaded. Photos are pending a trip this upcoming weekend. (I want to
            Message 5 of 20 , Mar 6 7:53 AM
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              Ted,

              The changes you asked for have been included in the HTML, and the new
              file has been uploaded. Photos are pending a trip this upcoming
              weekend. (I want to photograph it in use).

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "edwardripleyduggan"
              <erd@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dave--not a big deal, but propane and butane are still capitalized in
              > the HTML. Truly, these are don't need capitalizing. It doesn't
              > interfere with your meaning, and if you are more comfortable with them
              > that way, that's ultimately OK by me. However, it is, strictly
              > speaking, incorrect. If they were trade names, that would be a
              > different story, e.g. Velcro, Flagyl (to take two at random) but
              > chemical names are no different from any other noun in taking lower
              > case when in the body of a sentence.
              >
              > Ted.
              >
            • edwardripleyduggan
              Great! Upload as indicated when ready. Test your layout with the images in the test folder first. Images should not exceed (at the outside) 600 px; 450 px is
              Message 6 of 20 , Mar 6 10:27 AM
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                Great! Upload as indicated when ready. Test your layout with the
                images in the test folder first. Images should not exceed (at the
                outside) 600 px; 450 px is better, IMHO.

                Best,

                Ted.


                --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "David H" <dbhost3006@...> wrote:
                >
                > Ted,
                >
                > The changes you asked for have been included in the HTML, and the new
                > file has been uploaded. Photos are pending a trip this upcoming
                > weekend. (I want to photograph it in use).
                >
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