Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Questions for Steve Miller - OR DIAMOND STRIKE ANYWHERE MATCHES

Expand Messages
  • chcoa
    Thank you Steve. I new I had seen you in the queue before, but I have been know to mix up names so I wanted to double check. jamie ... L ... have ... but I
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 27, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you Steve. I new I had seen you in the queue before, but I
      have been know to mix up names so I wanted to double check.

      jamie

      --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Steven H. Miller
      <metaphorce@...> wrote:
      >
      > Jamie:
      >
      > This is my second OR. The first was the Therm-a-Rest Expedition
      L
      > mattress. It seems I'm listed as "steven miller" and that may
      have
      > foiled your search.
      >
      > http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Sleep%20Gear/
      > Pads%20and%20Air%20Mattresses/Therm-a-Rest%20Expedition%20L/
      > Owner%20Review%20by%20steven%20miller/
      >
      > Thanks for en-queuing me.
      >
      > SteveM
      >
      >
      > On Feb 27, 2006, at 4:07 PM, chcoa wrote:
      >
      > > Steve,
      > > Is this your 1st or 2nd OR?  I thought you had posted another
      but I
      > > do not see it when I search for it under your name on BGT. 
      > > Additionally, the original message of this OR has been
      deleted. 
      > > Since I missed that one, I'm posting your Revised version as the
      > > original - it has been added to the queue.
      > >
      > > Jamie D
      > > Edit Admin Officer
      > >
      > > --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Steven H. Miller
      > > <metaphorce@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Andy:
      > > >
      > > > Sorry, I forgot to spell-check after adding the revision.
      > > >
      > > > Just so you don't think I'm trying to abuse the patience of
      > > volunteer
      > > > editors,
      > > > please be aware that  I did look through it for MS Word
      spelling
      > > > flags(the red underlines), and caught most of them.  I missed
      > > three. 
      > > > But you're totally right, I didn't run spell check again. 
      You got
      > > me.
      > > >
      > > > Here is the re-revised OR:
      > > >
      > > > OWNER REVIEW - Diamond Strike Anywhere Large Kitchen Matches
      > > >
      > > > Name: Steven H.  Miller
      > > > Age: 52
      > > > Gender: Male
      > > > Height: 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
      > > > Weight: 175 lb (79 kg)
      > > > Email address: metaphorce@
      > > > City: Pacific Palisades, CA
      > > > Date: Feb. 23, 2006
      > > >
      > > > Backpacking Background:  I began backpacking in the early
      1980's,
      > > > trekking in the mountains and deserts of California.  I
      stopped
      > > > backpacking after I got married in the late 80's.  Now my
      sons are
      > > 10
      > > > and 13, and I've had to resurrect my equipment, my skills, and
      > > many
      > > > long-neglected muscles.  I recently took my first
      backpacking (as
      > > > opposed to car-camping) trip in 20 years.  I tend towards
      short
      > > tenting
      > > > trips, pack too much and end up carrying over 40 lb. in the
      desert
      > > > (including water). I'm looking for ways to cut it down without
      > > > sacrificing creature comforts.
      > > >
      > > > PRODUCT INFORMATION: Diamond Brands, Incorporated
      > > > Year of manufacture: 2005
      > > > Website: http://www.diamondbrands.com/
      > > > Listed weight: Not given
      > > > Weight as delivered: 0.01 oz / 0.22 gr (averaged)
      > > > Measured Width (shaft): 0.125 in / 3.2 mm
      > > > Measured Width (head): 0.15 in / 3.7 mm
      > > > Measured Length: 2.32 in / 59 mm
      > > > MSRP: N/A. (Typically sold in boxes of 250.   I bought a
      three-
      > > pack of
      > > > these boxes - 750 matches total - at my local supermarket for
      > > $2.99. 
      > > > That's less than $0.004 per match.)
      > > > These matches cannot be legally sold in some states such as
      > > Michigan
      > > > and Minnesota.
      > > >
      > > > PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:
      > > >
      > > > A Diamond Strike Anywhere Large Kitchen Match is a simple fire
      > > starting
      > > > device.  It has no moving parts.  It is a wooden match made
      of a
      > > stick
      > > > of Aspen wood with one tip dipped in a chemical paste.  The
      wood
      > > (or
      > > > "splint) is very light-colored.  The match head is red with a
      > > white dot
      > > > on the end of it.  (The white dot distinguishes "strike
      anywhere"
      > > > matches from the all-red-head matches which can only be
      ignited by
      > > > scraping on the special striking surface included with the
      > > packaging.) 
      > > > The main fuel ingredient of the match-head is sulfur, but
      there
      > > are
      > > > actually over twenty ingredients that serve to bind the match
      head
      > > > together, keep it burning, and control the ignition and burn-
      rate.
      > > >
      > > > The matches are packaged in a cardboard slide-drawer box. 
      Two
      > > sides of
      > > > the outer slide-case are surfaced with a textured coating in a
      > > pattern
      > > > of tiny hexagons, designed to facilitate striking the
      match.  
      > > However,
      > > > as the name implies, these matches can be lit by striking on a
      > > wide
      > > > variety of other surfaces.
      > > >
      > > > The match is ignited by gently and briskly scraping the white
      tip
      > > > across a slightly rough surface.  When done correctly, the
      match
      > > head
      > > > sparks and then bursts into flame.  Generally, a surface
      that is
      > > hard
      > > > and has a fine texture is ideal for striking.  Scraping on
      really
      > > > smooth surfaces such as polished stainless steel will not
      create
      > > enough
      > > > friction to ignite the match.  Very rough surfaces will often
      > > scrape
      > > > the chemical igniter (the white dot) right off the match
      head...
      > > > without igniting.
      > > >
      > > > The match flame can be easily extinguished by blowing on it
      hard,
      > > by
      > > > giving it a vigorous shake, or by snuffing it in water or
      almost
      > > > anything else damp.  In the case of campfires, the match can
      also
      > > be
      > > > thrown into the campfire without being extinguished, where it
      will
      > > be
      > > > consumed by flames.
      > > >
      > > > "Product Features" as listed on the package:
      > > >
      > > >      * Easy to Light
      > > >      * Strong, sturdy splint
      > > >      * Safe, non-toxic head
      > > >      * Burns clean with minimal smoke
      > > >      * Ideal for lighting candles, stoves, grills,
      fireplaces,
      > > campfires
      > > > and more
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > By some standards, these matches might be considered very low-
      > > tech, but
      > > > that's not necessarily a bad thing.  Considering the place
      of fire
      > > in
      > > > human history, matches are a fairly sophisticated invention,
      > > meeting
      > > > one of the oldest human needs in an extremely easy,
      accessible and
      > > > inexpensive way.  A caveman would have sacrificed half a
      village
      > > to get
      > > > his hands on this kind of technology, but we can buy hundreds
      of
      > > them
      > > > at any supermarket for about the price of a burger.   They
      were
      > > fairly
      > > > revolutionary when they were invented over a hundred years
      ago,
      > > and
      > > > they still do exactly what they were designed for, just as
      well as
      > > they
      > > > ever did.
      > > >
      > > > FIELD INFORMATION
      > > > LOCATIONS:
      > > > Car Camping: Sawmill Mountain in Angeles National Forest 5200
      ft /
      > > 1600
      > > > m.
      > > > Hidden Falls campground in Mountain Home State Forest 6200
      ft /
      > > 1900 m.
      > > > Wheeler Gorge Campground in Los Padre National Forest 1800
      ft /
      > > 550 m.
      > > > White Tank campground 3800 ft / 1150 m and Jumbo Rocks
      campground 
      > > 4400
      > > > ft / 1350 m, both in Joshua Tree National Park.
      > > > Backpacking: Pinto Basin in Joshua Tree National Park 1500
      ft /450
      > > m
      > > > -1600 ft / 500 m.
      > > >
      > > > DESCRIPTION OF LOCATIONS:
      > > > Sawmill Mountain is a dry campsite shaded by California live
      oaks
      > > and
      > > > long-needled pine trees.  It can be very windy, and has
      several
      > > signs
      > > > warning of high fire danger.  Fires are only allowed in
      designated
      > > > fire-rings.
      > > >
      > > > Mountain Home State Demonstration Forest is a redwood forest
      in
      > > the
      > > > southern part of Sequoia National Forest, just south of
      Sequoia
      > > > National Park.  The campsites at Hidden Falls are some
      distance
      > > from
      > > > the parking lot, ranged along the rim of a rock gorge
      featuring a
      > > > series of dramatic waterfalls.
      > > >
      > > > Wheeler Gorge is a narrow gorge in the Coastal Range north of
      > > Ojai,
      > > > California.  The campsites are along a stream, and most have
      lots
      > > of
      > > > shade-trees.
      > > >
      > > > Joshua Tree National Park is a desert park on the interface
      of the
      > > > Mojave and Sonoran deserts, offering several different kinds
      of
      > > terrain
      > > > at varying elevations.  Jumbo Rocks and White Tank
      campgrounds are
      > > in
      > > > the high desert, in an area of small loping hills and enormous
      > > rough
      > > > rock outcroppings.  Pinto Basin is flat desert and very
      sandy.  It
      > > is
      > > > completely unsheltered from wind.
      > > >
      > > > WEATHER CONDITIONS:
      > > > Sawmill Mountain was dry and windy when we visited there in
      mid-
      > > Summer.
      > > >   Temperature at night dropped to about 45-50 F / 7-10 C.
      > > >
      > > > Mountain Home State Demonstration Forest in late summer was
      warm
      > > during
      > > > the day, colder at night (probably about 45 F / 7 C).  No
      rain,
      > > but
      > > > considerable dew in the morning.   The wind was moderate.
      > > >
      > > > Wheeler Gorge in late summer was quite hot during the day,
      cool
      > > but not
      > > > cold at night (probably 50-55 F / 10-13 C).   Wind was
      moderate.
      > > >
      > > > Joshua Tree in winter has mild daytime temperatures, despite
      being
      > > in
      > > > the desert. It was sometimes as low as 55 F / 13 C during the
      day,
      > > and
      > > > never got above about 75 F / 24 C while we were there. 
      Nights can
      > > get
      > > > quite cold, however.  Pinto Basin on a January night was
      about 35
      > > F / 2
      > > > C with extremely strong winds.   On our trip to White Tank,
      we
      > > > encountered one of those rare and exciting desert rainstorms
      when
      > > we
      > > > first arrived, and the ground was actually damp beneath our
      tent
      > > > throughout our stay.  The hills and rock formations in White
      Tank
      > > and
      > > > Jumbo Rocks sheltered us somewhat from the wind.
      > > >
      > > > FIELD PERFORMANCE:
      > > > I have been using these matching for many years.  About 25
      years
      > > ago, I
      > > > purchased a small leather drawstring pouch and have been
      storing
      > > > matches in it ever since.  When I resumed camping and
      backpacking
      > > > activities after a hiatus of more than a dozen years, the
      matches
      > > in
      > > > the pouch still worked.  They appear to have a very long
      shelf-
      > > life as
      > > > long as they are kept dry.  Match-heads that get moist have a
      > > tendency
      > > > to disintegrate when struck.
      > > >
      > > > If a burning match is held at a slight downward angle, it will
      > > keep
      > > > burning right up the entire length of the splint.  The angle
      that
      > > gives
      > > > me the most consistent burn for the longest time looks like a
      > > > clock-hand pointing to 3:30 (with the match held in my left
      hand.)
      > > >
      > > > The practical burning time depends partly on how close the
      user is
      > > > willing to let the fire get to his/her fingers.   I hold my
      > > matches in
      > > > the middle for striking, then move my fingertips all the way
      to
      > > the
      > > > end.  I extinguish them when there is about 0.5 in / 13mm of
      > > uncharred
      > > > wood left.  In windless conditions near sea level at an
      ambient
      > > > temperature of about 65 F /  36 C, this yields a burn time of
      > > > approximately 25 seconds.   I have had some matches that
      burn more
      > > than
      > > > 30 seconds this way.  Others burn up more quickly.
      > > >
      > > > This brings me to one of the most significant aspects of this
      > > product,
      > > > its inconsistency.  Matches are a very cheap product, and
      quality
      > > > control is fairly loose.  As might be expected, the wood
      splint is
      > > very
      > > > variable in strength and structure.  This results in a
      certain
      > > > percentage of match splints splitting or shearing off when
      > > struck. 
      > > > Usually when a match has broken while being struck, the head
      has
      > > not
      > > > ignited. A few times, I have had to contend with a flaming
      match-
      > > head
      > > > flying off the stick, but this has been rare.  Sometimes the
      match
      > > will
      > > > split partially and ignite, so I'm left with a flaming end
      > > dangling at
      > > > a peculiar angle, with a flame that is difficult to control
      and
      > > likely
      > > > to fly off flamboyant if I shake it in an attempt to
      extinguish it.
      > > >
      > > > There is also considerable inconsistency in the structure of
      the
      > > match
      > > > head.  On some matches the white dot covers a quarter of the
      match
      > > > head.  On others it's just a tiny dot on the very tip.  The
      > > smaller the
      > > > white dot, the more difficult it is to get the match to
      ignite. 
      > > If a
      > > > match with a small dot is scraped at a very accurate
      perpendicular
      > > > angle, it has a good chance of igniting on the first try. 
      But if
      > > it
      > > > fails to ignite, too much of the white may be scraped off in
      the
      > > first
      > > > attempt, dooming future attempts to further failures.  I have
      > > learned
      > > > over the years that I can be very casual about the striking
      angle
      > > I use
      > > > with a match that has a large white dot, but a small-dotted
      match
      > > has
      > > > to be held and struck carefully if success is to be achieved.
      > >      
      > > >
      > > > Despite these difficulties, Diamond Strike Anywhere Large
      Kitchen
      > > > Matches are my preferred fire-starting system.   I have
      used these
      > > > matches in cold and windy conditions, and they have always
      > > worked.  Not
      > > > every single match worked, but I was always able to light the
      > > fire,
      > > > stove, or lantern within a few tries.  I have not tried to
      use
      > > them in
      > > > pouring rain, however.
      > > >
      > > > These matches are extremely useful for a wide variety of
      igniting
      > > and
      > > > burning uses.  When lighting a campfire built in a steel
      fire ring
      > > > (such as are becoming quite common in our national park
      > > campgrounds), I
      > > > can torch my underlayment of newspaper at three or four
      different
      > > spots
      > > > on a single match.  When backpacking, they are perfect for
      > > lighting my
      > > > liquid-fuel stoves.  My Svea 123R used with fire-paste
      pretty much
      > > > requires something long and thin to be inserted through one
      of the
      > > > holes in the brass windscreen-case.  This would be difficult
      with
      > > most
      > > > flint-strikers, and probably with most liquid-fuel lighters,
      but a
      > > > kitchen match is perfect.  With my MSR Dragonfly stove, I am
      very
      > > happy
      > > > to have my fingers as far from the naked liquid fuel as
      possible
      > > when I
      > > > ignite it, and the length of a large kitchen match provides a
      very
      > > > comfortable distance.  I am equally grateful for this
      distance
      > > when
      > > > lighting my new soda-can alcohol stove.  My Coleman liquid
      fuel
      > > lantern
      > > > requires ignition through a very small porthole.  The kitchen
      > > match
      > > > fits the aperture of the hole and the distance to the mantle
      > > perfectly,
      > > > and allows me to keep the burning match near the mantle for
      quite
      > > a
      > > > while, which is very useful when the lantern is hesitating to
      > > light up.
      > > >
      > > > In campgrounds, I can usually strike a match successfully on
      the
      > > side
      > > > of a concrete picnic table, or on the side of a steel fire-
      ring if
      > > it
      > > > has rusted sufficiently to give it a bit of gritty texture. 
      When
      > > > backpacking, however, good striking surfaces are not always
      > > immediately
      > > > handy.  For this reason, I carry a small, flat rock in my
      match-
      > > pouch. 
      > > > It is an excellent striking surface.  It allows me to "cup"
      the
      > > match
      > > > with my hands - that is, use my hands as a wind-screen - very
      > > quickly
      > > > after striking, to protect the match from being blown out in
      high
      > > > winds.  It also allows me to bring the striking surface near
      the
      > > target
      > > > (campfire, stove, lantern) thus reducing the amount of space
      and
      > > time
      > > > the match has to travel between striking and igniting the
      target,
      > > > giving the match less chance to get blown out.  It is very
      > > predictable,
      > > > too which reduces the number of wasted matches.
      > > >
      > > > Diamond Strike Anywhere Large Kitchen Matches are useful for a
      > > variety
      > > > of other purposes.  They can serve as a short-term temporary
      light
      > > > source (like while I'm searching for where I put down my
      > > flashlight). 
      > > > They are good for flame-welding the end of nylon cord so it
      > > doesn't
      > > > fray and unravel.    I've also whittled a match down with
      my
      > > pocket
      > > > knife for use as an emergency toothpick.
      > > >
      > > > They weigh next to nothing.  I routinely carry about three
      times
      > > as
      > > > many matches as I expect to use. The weight difference in my
      pack
      > > with
      > > > a full supply of matches VS an empty match-pouch is not
      noticeable
      > > at
      > > > all.
      > > >
      > > > SAFETY CONCERNS
      > > >
      > > > Matches in general raise certain safety concerns.   They are
      > > intended
      > > > for starting fires, and fires are inherently dangerous if not
      > > > controlled properly.  It would be inappropriate to discuss
      all the
      > > > details of fire safety in this review, but I would advise
      anyone
      > > > lighting a fire to review fire safety precautions in general,
      and
      > > local
      > > > fire restrictions in particular.  Some places require a
      permit for
      > > the
      > > > use of any fire, even a stove.
      > > >
      > > > Matches should be kept away from children, since they are not
      only
      > > > dangerous but often quite fascinating to children.  Children
      have
      > > a
      > > > tendency to be curious enough to strike a match, but then
      > > frightened
      > > > enough to drop it hastily once it ignites.  Obviously, this
      is
      > > quite
      > > > dangerous.  When a child gets old enough to use matches, the
      child
      > > > should be taught how to do so safely and observed by an adult
      the
      > > first
      > > > few times the child uses matches.
      > > >
      > > > Matches should only be struck one at a time, not in multiples
      > > > simultaneously. When a match is extinguished, it's important
      to
      > > make
      > > > sure the match is really out and cold before putting it down
      on or
      > > near
      > > > anything flammable.
      > > >
      > > > Strike anywhere matches have particular safety issues worth
      > > noting. 
      > > > They are not allowed to be carried on airplanes in the US. 
      > > (Neither
      > > > are lighters.  Only safety matches are allowed, and they
      must be
      > > > carried on one's person.)  This is probably because strike
      > > anywhere
      > > > matches can spontaneously ignite if they are jarred.  I once
      saw
      > > my
      > > > father drop a closed box of strike anywhere matches on the
      floor,
      > > and
      > > > the entire box burst into flames with a whoosh.  It was quite
      > > shocking.
      > > >
      > > > A note about striking matches:  These matches seems to
      attract
      > > > extravagant behavior.  I have seen people strike them by
      flicking
      > > the
      > > > head with a thumbnail.  I have tried this, and I never do it
      any
      > > more,
      > > > because I don't want a burn on the tip of my thumb, nor do I
      > > desire to
      > > > have a hunk of burning chemical paste caught under my
      thumbnail,
      > > nor do
      > > > I want to see a burning match head fly off the splint and
      land on
      > > a
      > > > flammable surface (such as my shirt).  In the movies, I have
      seen
      > > > people strike these matches by scraping them on the seat their
      > > pants. 
      > > > I don't know if you can do this with modern pants, but I don't
      > > intend
      > > > to find out, either.  I have also seen people use them as
      small-
      > > scale
      > > > fireworks by throwing them head first at a hard surface to
      see if
      > > > they'll ignite on contact.  That's just plain foolish.
      > > >
      > > > SUMMARY
      > > > These matches are lightweight, cheap, handy, and reasonably
      > > reliable. 
      > > > They are the best way I've found to accomplish several fire
      > > lighting
      > > > tasks, such as stoves or lanterns that require ignition
      through a
      > > small
      > > > port hole.  They provide a measure of safety for my fingers
      in
      > > most
      > > > fire lighting tasks.  They burn for a long time.  They keep
      well
      > > for a
      > > > long time.  Some of them fail, some of them break, but
      enough of
      > > them
      > > > work to make a very usable and cost-effective fire lighting
      > > system. 
      > > > This match may not be made in heaven, but it suits me well.
      > > >
      > > > LIKES:
      > > > Lightweight
      > > > Easily obtainable
      > > > Reasonably reliable
      > > > Long enough to keep my fingers away from the fire
      > > > Enough burn-time to accomplish difficult ignition tasks
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > DISLIKES:
      > > > Sometimes they break
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > To read our reviews, please visit
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > SPONSORED LINKS
      > > Survival guide
      > > High
      > > Hiking
      > > Tester
      > > Alaska hiking
      > > Alaska outdoors
      > >
      > > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
      > >
      > > ▪  Visit your group "BackpackGearTest" on the web.
      > >  
      > > ▪  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > >  BackpackGearTest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > >  
      > > ▪  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
      Terms of
      > > Service.
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.