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REPOST - Owner Review - Marmot Eiger 36

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  • gcmehojah
    Roger, Here is the revised/edited version of my Owner Review based on your suggestions. I thought I would get your take on it again before posting it to the
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 7, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Roger,

      Here is the revised/edited version of my Owner Review based on your
      suggestions. I thought I would get your take on it again before
      posting it to the Test folder. I hope this is OK with you.

      Greg

      ------------------------------------------

      Owner Review - Marmot Eiger 36 Pack
      Greg Mehojah
      November 7, 2005

      Biographical Information:

      Name: Greg Mehojah
      Age: 33
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6' 1" (1.85 m)
      Weight: 210 lb (95 kg)
      Email: gmehojah3@...
      City, State, Country: Albuquerque, New Mexico

      Backpacking Background:

      I began backpacking this year to reintroduce myself to the outdoors,
      and introduce my 10 year old son to backpacking. My trips are
      typically 1-2 nights with my son and 2 nights when I solo. My first
      season has taken me through desert terrain and high-altitude
      meadowlands throughout New Mexico, as well as day hikes of the
      foothills and ridgeline trails of the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque.
      I carry most of the gear when I hike with my son, so I am not a
      lightweight hiker, but plan on moving that direction as my son gets older.

      Product Information:

      Manufacturer: Marmot
      Year of Manufacture: 2005
      URL: http://www.marmot.com
      Listed Weight: 3 lb 6 oz /1.5 kg
      Weight as Delivered: 3 lb 6 oz /1.5 kg
      Volume: 2400 cu in. (39 L)
      Size: Large
      Available Colors: Blue, Gold, Red, Black
      MSRP: $99.00 US

      The Marmot Eiger 36 is a technical daypack marketed for "climbers,
      hikers and skiers" to fill the gap between smaller daypacks and larger
      weekend packs. The Eiger 36 is constructed using 420d Broken Twill
      nylon, and reinforced with 860d HT nylon. My Eiger 36 is blue, but is
      also available in gold (yellow), red and black colors. The interior
      is accessible only through the typical top opening, which closes
      through an internal drawstring and an extension collar (that also has
      its own drawstring). The contents can be further secured with the 1
      inch compression strap. The extension collar provides additional
      expansion room for larger loads. The top lid has two zippered
      compartments, is secured to the pack with a single 2 inch nylon clip,
      and is completely removable.

      One side of the interior of the Eiger 36 is lined with bright yellow
      fabric to make finding gear easier in dark conditions (especially with
      the dark colored packs) and also includes a simple hydration sleeve.
      The pack also has 2 ice-axe loops and 2 small shock cord loops for
      securing the ends of the axe handles, a sturdy daisy chain, 2 side
      pockets, and 2 compression straps on either side of the pack to
      stabilize the contents or, alternatively, for lashing on additional
      gear.

      The waist-belt is made from Marmot's Dri-Clime fabric, and is
      unpadded. The belt, which includes load stabilizer straps, is
      attached to the pack with a substantial amount of hook-and-loop
      material, allowing for easy and complete removal from the pack. The
      shoulder straps are "S" shaped, which Marmot claims allows carrying of
      loads up to 25 lbs (11.34 kg) comfortably. The included sternum strap
      has elastic fabric built into it to provide flexibility for breathing
      without constriction. The load of the pack can be snugged to the
      wearer's back through the use of the load lifter straps. Finally, the
      Eiger 36 has a molded back panel, supported by a single aluminum stay
      that can be removed from the interior of the pack. Access to the
      aluminum stay is through a pocket in the hydration sleeve. The pack
      does not feature adjustable torso length, so purchasing the right size
      is an important factor for getting a good fit.

      Field Use:

      I originally used this pack to get in shape for the upcoming summer
      backpacking season. I loaded the pack with a solid 35 lbs (15.88 kg)
      of gear and water for 10 mile (16.10 km), intense day hikes. My first
      trip was an early spring day-hike up a popular local mountain trail
      that gains three thousand feet in 4 miles, experiencing temperatures
      that ranged from 65 degrees (18.33 C) at its base, to 45 degrees (7.22
      C) at the top, where I trudged through a snow field for the last mile.
      I found that the Eiger 36 carried this load remarkably well, and
      quite a bit better than I expected. The slim design proved very
      useful during some unexpected bush whacking through alpine thickets,
      and didn't show a single snag after some moderate abuse. I have since
      used this pack exclusively for hiking up my local mountain trails.

      After a few day trips with the pack, I found that I could fit all my
      gear into the pack for a two night solo trip. While this required
      strapping my sleeping pad and tent poles to the pack using the side
      compression straps, I was able to shave 2 lbs (0.91 kg) by using the
      Eiger 36 rather than my standard weekend pack. The bottom interior of
      the pack is actually larger than the rest of the upper compartment,
      which makes stuffing in gear more efficient. I can slip my down
      sleeping bag and solo tent side-by-side into the bottom of the pack.
      I am not a light and fast hiker, but the Eiger 36 easily swallowed all
      of my standard gear.

      I used the Eiger 36 on my first solo overnight trip to Bandelier
      National Monument in April. My pack weight for this trip was about 33
      lbs (14.97 kg). The initial climb out of Frijoles canyon was made very
      comfortable and stable by the sway-free load carrying of the pack. I
      did find, however, that over the course of the first leg of the hike,
      a moderate 8 miles (12.88 km), the waist-belt began slipping and
      transferring more weight to my shoulders. Even though the shoulder
      straps are very comfortable, my shoulders along the collar bone area
      began getting sore. This appears to be due to the flimsy nature of
      the included waist-belt. Admittedly, the pack is not designed to
      carry this much weight, and I certainly overloaded it beyond the
      manufacturer's specifications. Despite this fact, my descent back
      into upper Frijoles canyon down slippery, icy conditions was not at
      all unpredictable. Again, the slim lines of the pack proved very
      useful while crawling over and under downfall on the trail. I was a
      bit concerned that the fabric was taking too much of a beating on this
      trip given the amount of downfall that I had to negotiate. Because
      the fabric on the pack was stretched taught due to cramming in all of
      my standard gear, I worried that a snag on a branch or thicket might
      easily tear the pack rather than just create snags. However, the
      pack, though it has some snags, proved to be very tough and still
      looks brand new. Subsequent use of the pack for solo overnight trips
      and long day hikes have not shown any significant wear to the pack.
      Even at higher than intended weight loads, the pack has not shown any
      hint of tearing at the waist-belt stabilizer straps, nor at the
      shoulder strap attachment points. I have about 120 miles (193 km) on
      this pack from this season. At the end of each use, I simply wipe the
      pack down with a wet rag and it looks nearly brand new.

      I have found the Eiger 36 to be a solid performing pack that is
      durable, comfortable, and pretty sway-free in carrying loads up to 25
      lbs (11.34 kg). While the Eiger is a bit on the portly side for its
      size compared to similar packs in its class, the durability easily
      makes up for the weight. I did find that the waist belt becomes less
      comfortable at heavier loads, transferring more weight to the shoulder
      straps. Subsequent test trips with the pack tended to show that this
      is the case when carrying anything above 25 lbs (11.34 kg). I
      resolved this issue by ordering a waist belt from Marmot sold with
      their larger Eiger 45 pack. This solved my heavy load issues, and I
      can now switch between the two belts depending on the route and load
      size. I also found that the side pockets become useless when the pack
      is fully loaded, and the lid does not cinch down tightly when the pack
      is not fully loaded. This is easily remedied by simply removing the
      lid, which also shaves nearly a pound off the overall pack weight. I
      generally now take the top lid off for day hikes that do not require
      the pack to be fully loaded, and keep the lid attached for over night
      hikes. I would also like to see dog-bone patches on the bottom of the
      pack for lashing on additional gear. Finally, the Eiger is not
      waterproof, but any water that leaked in through my garbage bag rain
      cover did dry fairly quickly.

      Summary:

      I am very impressed with both the durability and versatility of this
      pack. I especially like the ability to use different waist-belts for
      carrying different types of loads. I definitely plan on continuing to
      use this pack for long day hikes and solo, lightweight overnights trips.

      Things I like:

      1. Durable Construction.
      2. Removable Top Lid.
      3. Removable/Replaceable Waist Belt.

      Things I did Not Like:

      1. Lid Does Not Cinch Down for Undersize Loads.
      2. Waist Belt Uncomfortable at loads Greater Than 25 lbs (11.34 kg)
      3. Side Pockets Useless When Pack is Fully Loaded.
    • gcmehojah
      I got antsey and decided to go ahead and upload the edited/reposted review to the BGT Owner Review section. Let me know what you think. Greg ... Albuquerque.
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 10, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        I got antsey and decided to go ahead and upload the edited/reposted
        review to the BGT Owner Review section. Let me know what you think.

        Greg

        --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "gcmehojah" <gmehojah3@c...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Roger,
        >
        > Here is the revised/edited version of my Owner Review based on your
        > suggestions. I thought I would get your take on it again before
        > posting it to the Test folder. I hope this is OK with you.
        >
        > Greg
        >
        > ------------------------------------------
        >
        > Owner Review - Marmot Eiger 36 Pack
        > Greg Mehojah
        > November 7, 2005
        >
        > Biographical Information:
        >
        > Name: Greg Mehojah
        > Age: 33
        > Gender: Male
        > Height: 6' 1" (1.85 m)
        > Weight: 210 lb (95 kg)
        > Email: gmehojah3@c...
        > City, State, Country: Albuquerque, New Mexico
        >
        > Backpacking Background:
        >
        > I began backpacking this year to reintroduce myself to the outdoors,
        > and introduce my 10 year old son to backpacking. My trips are
        > typically 1-2 nights with my son and 2 nights when I solo. My first
        > season has taken me through desert terrain and high-altitude
        > meadowlands throughout New Mexico, as well as day hikes of the
        > foothills and ridgeline trails of the Sandia Mountains in
        Albuquerque.
        > I carry most of the gear when I hike with my son, so I am not a
        > lightweight hiker, but plan on moving that direction as my son gets
        older.
        >
        > Product Information:
        >
        > Manufacturer: Marmot
        > Year of Manufacture: 2005
        > URL: http://www.marmot.com
        > Listed Weight: 3 lb 6 oz /1.5 kg
        > Weight as Delivered: 3 lb 6 oz /1.5 kg
        > Volume: 2400 cu in. (39 L)
        > Size: Large
        > Available Colors: Blue, Gold, Red, Black
        > MSRP: $99.00 US
        >
        > The Marmot Eiger 36 is a technical daypack marketed for "climbers,
        > hikers and skiers" to fill the gap between smaller daypacks and
        larger
        > weekend packs. The Eiger 36 is constructed using 420d Broken Twill
        > nylon, and reinforced with 860d HT nylon. My Eiger 36 is blue, but
        is
        > also available in gold (yellow), red and black colors. The interior
        > is accessible only through the typical top opening, which closes
        > through an internal drawstring and an extension collar (that also
        has
        > its own drawstring). The contents can be further secured with the 1
        > inch compression strap. The extension collar provides additional
        > expansion room for larger loads. The top lid has two zippered
        > compartments, is secured to the pack with a single 2 inch nylon
        clip,
        > and is completely removable.
        >
        > One side of the interior of the Eiger 36 is lined with bright yellow
        > fabric to make finding gear easier in dark conditions (especially
        with
        > the dark colored packs) and also includes a simple hydration
        sleeve.
        > The pack also has 2 ice-axe loops and 2 small shock cord loops for
        > securing the ends of the axe handles, a sturdy daisy chain, 2 side
        > pockets, and 2 compression straps on either side of the pack to
        > stabilize the contents or, alternatively, for lashing on additional
        > gear.
        >
        > The waist-belt is made from Marmot's Dri-Clime fabric, and is
        > unpadded. The belt, which includes load stabilizer straps, is
        > attached to the pack with a substantial amount of hook-and-loop
        > material, allowing for easy and complete removal from the pack. The
        > shoulder straps are "S" shaped, which Marmot claims allows carrying
        of
        > loads up to 25 lbs (11.34 kg) comfortably. The included sternum
        strap
        > has elastic fabric built into it to provide flexibility for
        breathing
        > without constriction. The load of the pack can be snugged to the
        > wearer's back through the use of the load lifter straps. Finally,
        the
        > Eiger 36 has a molded back panel, supported by a single aluminum
        stay
        > that can be removed from the interior of the pack. Access to the
        > aluminum stay is through a pocket in the hydration sleeve. The pack
        > does not feature adjustable torso length, so purchasing the right
        size
        > is an important factor for getting a good fit.
        >
        > Field Use:
        >
        > I originally used this pack to get in shape for the upcoming summer
        > backpacking season. I loaded the pack with a solid 35 lbs (15.88
        kg)
        > of gear and water for 10 mile (16.10 km), intense day hikes. My
        first
        > trip was an early spring day-hike up a popular local mountain trail
        > that gains three thousand feet in 4 miles, experiencing temperatures
        > that ranged from 65 degrees (18.33 C) at its base, to 45 degrees
        (7.22
        > C) at the top, where I trudged through a snow field for the last
        mile.
        > I found that the Eiger 36 carried this load remarkably well, and
        > quite a bit better than I expected. The slim design proved very
        > useful during some unexpected bush whacking through alpine thickets,
        > and didn't show a single snag after some moderate abuse. I have
        since
        > used this pack exclusively for hiking up my local mountain trails.
        >
        > After a few day trips with the pack, I found that I could fit all my
        > gear into the pack for a two night solo trip. While this required
        > strapping my sleeping pad and tent poles to the pack using the side
        > compression straps, I was able to shave 2 lbs (0.91 kg) by using the
        > Eiger 36 rather than my standard weekend pack. The bottom interior
        of
        > the pack is actually larger than the rest of the upper compartment,
        > which makes stuffing in gear more efficient. I can slip my down
        > sleeping bag and solo tent side-by-side into the bottom of the
        pack.
        > I am not a light and fast hiker, but the Eiger 36 easily swallowed
        all
        > of my standard gear.
        >
        > I used the Eiger 36 on my first solo overnight trip to Bandelier
        > National Monument in April. My pack weight for this trip was about
        33
        > lbs (14.97 kg). The initial climb out of Frijoles canyon was made
        very
        > comfortable and stable by the sway-free load carrying of the pack.
        I
        > did find, however, that over the course of the first leg of the
        hike,
        > a moderate 8 miles (12.88 km), the waist-belt began slipping and
        > transferring more weight to my shoulders. Even though the shoulder
        > straps are very comfortable, my shoulders along the collar bone area
        > began getting sore. This appears to be due to the flimsy nature of
        > the included waist-belt. Admittedly, the pack is not designed to
        > carry this much weight, and I certainly overloaded it beyond the
        > manufacturer's specifications. Despite this fact, my descent back
        > into upper Frijoles canyon down slippery, icy conditions was not at
        > all unpredictable. Again, the slim lines of the pack proved very
        > useful while crawling over and under downfall on the trail. I was a
        > bit concerned that the fabric was taking too much of a beating on
        this
        > trip given the amount of downfall that I had to negotiate. Because
        > the fabric on the pack was stretched taught due to cramming in all
        of
        > my standard gear, I worried that a snag on a branch or thicket might
        > easily tear the pack rather than just create snags. However, the
        > pack, though it has some snags, proved to be very tough and still
        > looks brand new. Subsequent use of the pack for solo overnight
        trips
        > and long day hikes have not shown any significant wear to the pack.
        > Even at higher than intended weight loads, the pack has not shown
        any
        > hint of tearing at the waist-belt stabilizer straps, nor at the
        > shoulder strap attachment points. I have about 120 miles (193 km)
        on
        > this pack from this season. At the end of each use, I simply wipe
        the
        > pack down with a wet rag and it looks nearly brand new.
        >
        > I have found the Eiger 36 to be a solid performing pack that is
        > durable, comfortable, and pretty sway-free in carrying loads up to
        25
        > lbs (11.34 kg). While the Eiger is a bit on the portly side for its
        > size compared to similar packs in its class, the durability easily
        > makes up for the weight. I did find that the waist belt becomes
        less
        > comfortable at heavier loads, transferring more weight to the
        shoulder
        > straps. Subsequent test trips with the pack tended to show that
        this
        > is the case when carrying anything above 25 lbs (11.34 kg). I
        > resolved this issue by ordering a waist belt from Marmot sold with
        > their larger Eiger 45 pack. This solved my heavy load issues, and I
        > can now switch between the two belts depending on the route and load
        > size. I also found that the side pockets become useless when the
        pack
        > is fully loaded, and the lid does not cinch down tightly when the
        pack
        > is not fully loaded. This is easily remedied by simply removing the
        > lid, which also shaves nearly a pound off the overall pack weight.
        I
        > generally now take the top lid off for day hikes that do not require
        > the pack to be fully loaded, and keep the lid attached for over
        night
        > hikes. I would also like to see dog-bone patches on the bottom of
        the
        > pack for lashing on additional gear. Finally, the Eiger is not
        > waterproof, but any water that leaked in through my garbage bag rain
        > cover did dry fairly quickly.
        >
        > Summary:
        >
        > I am very impressed with both the durability and versatility of this
        > pack. I especially like the ability to use different waist-belts
        for
        > carrying different types of loads. I definitely plan on continuing
        to
        > use this pack for long day hikes and solo, lightweight overnights
        trips.
        >
        > Things I like:
        >
        > 1. Durable Construction.
        > 2. Removable Top Lid.
        > 3. Removable/Replaceable Waist Belt.
        >
        > Things I did Not Like:
        >
        > 1. Lid Does Not Cinch Down for Undersize Loads.
        > 2. Waist Belt Uncomfortable at loads Greater Than 25 lbs (11.34
        kg)
        > 3. Side Pockets Useless When Pack is Fully Loaded.
        >
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