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OR - Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots - Jennifer "Kasdira" Hay

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  • ~*~kasdira~*~
    Well, here it is after much nail biting and butterflies, my first owner review. I haven t done html in a couple years, but I have made my first attempt in that
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 31, 2005
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      Well, here it is after much nail biting and butterflies, my first
      owner review. I haven't done html in a couple years, but I have made
      my first attempt in that as well =D
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/OWNER%20REVIEWS/OR-%
      20Earth%20Shoe%20Boots/ or http://tinyurl.com/9vyw8
      I am working on providing a photo for the final version, and hope to
      have it available in the next few days. Woohoo! This was fun! Be
      kind oh great editors! =D

      Jennifer "Kasdira" Hay

      Owner Review
      The Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots
      October 23, 2005

      Name: Jennifer "Kasdira" Hay
      Age: 29 years old
      Gender: Female
      Height: 5' 4" (1.62 m)
      Weight: 198 lbs (90 kg)
      Shoe Size: 7 ½W US (6 UK)
      Email Address: kasdira@...
      City, State, Country: Pensacola, Florida USA

      Backpacking Background:
      My backpacking background is very limited to the last couple of
      years and to the Northwest Florida area. While I started my
      beginnings with the typical comforts of "car camping"; I have since
      began Ultralight Backpacking. I like the idea of getting away – AS
      far away as my feet can take me. Right now my current gear consists
      mainly of "Walmart specials", a few lucky finds from the Florida
      Trail Association's state conference auctions, and a birthday
      shopping spree on REI.

      About my feet: I am a difficult person to get into shoes. I
      typically wear a 7-1/2W US (6 UK) size shoe – but because wide shoes
      can be difficult to find, I find myself in 8 and 8-1/2 (6 ½ - 7 UK)
      size shoes.


      Product Information - The Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots

      a. Manufacturer – Earth Shoe
      b. Year of Purchase – 2004
      c. Manufacturer website – www.earthshoe.com
      d. Listed weight – No Longer Available
      e. Weight as delivered – 2 lb 11 oz (1.23 kg) for the pair
      f. MSRP – No Longer Available
      g. Color - Tan

      Product Description
      I bought these boots in hopes of making my feet less tired when
      hiking. Prior to this purchase all I had hiked in was a pair of
      sneakers. I decided on trying the Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots
      because I had previously owned a couple pairs of their dress shoes
      for work. I found those dress shoes to be comfortable and not as
      tiring on my feet since my job required me to be standing for 8+
      hours everyday. My history with the manufacturer pushed me more to
      consider these boots.

      The Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots are predominately made of
      waterproof treated brown brushed leather, which appears to be glued
      to a black rubber sole that is 1 in. (2.54 cm) thick at the toe and
      gradually increases to 2 in. (5.08 cm). The boots also have an EVA
      (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) midsole, which is used to give greater
      comfort. The lug pattern on the outsole is approximately .25 in.
      (.64 cm) deep. The rolled cuff on the outside of the back ankle area
      has a small amount of an unknown synthetic black and brown basket-
      weave type material. The tongue is gusseted to the upper and covered
      with the same material as the rolled cuff and then topped with 2
      small leather pieces. The liner is made of a synthetic black
      material designed to be moisture absorbing. The boots are laced
      through 10 D-rings across the top of the foot and secured at the
      ankle using four lace-hooks.

      Using the shoes straight out of the box, I did find some discomfort.
      This discomfort was not in the typical places, such as the toes or
      the heels. Instead when I first bought them, the top of the boots
      bit into the back of my Achilles tendons and left bruises on the
      back of my ankles. The only way I could wear the boots initially was
      to only lace them across the top of the foot, and not utilize the
      hooks across the ankles. After about a month or so, with some
      standing and squashing of the ankle area to make them less rigid, I
      was able to lace them completely up. Aside from my ankle issues, the
      rest of the boot is relatively comfortable. There is plenty of room
      for my toes and there is a sufficient amount of arch support; so I
      have never needed to use any aftermarket insoles. The padding in the
      wall of the boots appears to be adequate for the temperatures I
      typically hike. In the hotter months my feet do not get too hot
      because of the boots breathing capabilities. In the colder months I
      find them to be warm enough for my liking. The laces that came with
      the shoes are 64 in. (163 cm) long and made of the same black and
      brown material found on the boots. I have only used a traditional
      criss-cross lacing, because it provides adjustable comfort in the
      boots, and have not experimented with any other lacing method. The
      waterproof attributes have been tested in heavy downpours and wading
      through large puddles on the trail. The gusseting on the tongue has
      helped considerably to keep out pine needles, sand and other small
      annoyances. I have owned these boots for about a year and a half;
      while my hikes have been short distances, I have hiked a little over
      a hundred miles (161 km) in them. Throughout this usage I have not
      had any issues with blisters or other foot maladies.

      Specific Field Information
      Most of my hiking has taken place in the Northwest Florida area,
      which averages less than 50ft (12.7m) above sea level. My hikes have
      been on terrain ranging from paved foot-trails and roadways,
      marshlands, dry and wet clay, heavy foliage, thick wiregrass, sandy
      trails and the occasional wooden walkways. I have worn them in a
      varying range of temperatures from 30 degrees F (-1 C) to 96 degrees
      F (36 C) (not including any heat index changes due to humidity).

      October of 2004, I had the perfect opportunity to test the soundness
      of the waterproof attributes. During a camping trip in the Northwest
      Florida area at Karick Lake – part of the Jackson Red Ground Trail -
      my companions and I were caught in a full-on torrential rain. The
      hour-long downpour left us standing in nearly 8 in. (20.32 cm) of
      red clay-streaked murky water. My feet stayed dry for most of that
      time, until the water rose higher than the tops of my boots. With
      the water inside the boots, they quickly were beyond their
      saturation limit and I was shoeless for the remaining 36 hours of
      the campout. Because of the wonderful waterproof feature, the boots
      took a very long time to completely dry. Even with the boots tipped
      over on the openings, they took two weeks to fully dry out.

      In May of 2005, I had the opportunity to wear the boots in the
      Little Florida Mountains, in the southern part of New Mexico. The
      Rockhound State Park Trail was the highest I had ever hiked -
      averaging around 4500 ft (1350 m) above sea level. This area was
      predominately steep rocky surfaces with areas of caliche clay. I was
      there during a pleasant time of the year for the southwestern United
      States, so the temperature was about 90 degrees F (32 C) for most of
      my trip. Again the gusseted tongue proved to be useful in keeping
      out Goatheads (Tribulus terrestris), cactus needles, and small
      rocks. Climbing the rocky areas off the path was not too bad
      considering the small lugs on the sole of the boot. I did not find
      that this small lug size impeded my ability to get to higher places
      that were not as easily accessible as the rest of the footpath. I
      also found that my feet stayed considerably cool even while in this
      arid hotter climate.

      I utilized an overnight hike to the Blackwater River in October of
      2005 as another attempt of testing the soundness of the waterproof
      capabilities. I tried to walk in as many stagnant puddles as
      possible to allow the water to rise around the top of the foot and
      even along the tongue area. I also wore these into the river when
      refilling my nalgene bottle, so there was at least 3 in. (7.62 cm)
      moving water over the top area of the foot as well. I was pleased
      to see that these shoes definitely held up with their waterproof
      characteristics in stationary as well as moving waters.

      Conclusion
      Overall, I am pleased with the Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boot. While I
      originally did not care for the stiffness in the rolled cuff on the
      ankles, I managed to overcome this little issue with time. I enjoy
      the comfort of the inner sole of the boots and their general
      weatherproof qualities. In the time that I have owned the boots,
      they show minimal wear. The outsole has worn evenly on the tread,
      and the glue has stayed intact with the upper even with all the
      water exposure. The only noticeable signs of aging are inside the
      shoe where the eyelets used to secure the lace hooks have a small
      amount of rust; this is quite possibly from the time the boots were
      completely waterlogged. The inner liner is completely intact and
      shows no signs of thinning.

      Pros/Cons Summary:
      Pro 1 – Comfortable inner sole and arches
      Pro 2 – Very much waterproof
      Pro 3 – Very durable

      Con 1 – Stiff ankle areas
      Con 2 – Takes a long time to dry out
    • chcoa
      PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be picked up by an
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 3, 2005
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        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner
        Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. Do
        not worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our
        Editors are volunteers and your report will be subject to an
        official edit within fourteen days. If you have not had a response
        from an Edit Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this
        timeframe, please let me know directly at jdeben@....

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask
        that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our
        experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved
        and uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews.
        This way we can work with you on addressing any standard BGT policy
        edits which you can incorporate into your second and subsequent
        reviews before submission.

        If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community!
        The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints,
        to get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely
        manner. Once these first two Owner Reviews have been approved and
        you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to
        start applying for Tests. If you'd like more assistance or guidance
        with the process you can request a mentor by sending an email to
        Jennifer P, the mentor coordinator, at (jennifer.pope@...).

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group.
        These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered
        carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your
        review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list
        will usually result in a better review, as well as making things
        easier for the official Editor. Please put REVISED in the subject
        line of your re-submitted review, if you take this route or make any
        changes to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit
        Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups
        list to keep track of the progress of your Owner Review. Once an
        Editor has taken your OR and made the necessary edits they will post
        their comments to the list with EDIT in the subject line. Once you
        have incorporated these edits into your review please use REPOST in
        the subject line. When your OR has been approved by the Editor they
        will use APPROVED in the subject line.

        If you'd like to keep track of the progress of your OR, the entire
        Owner Review Queue is posted to the yahoo group list on Fridays.

        If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to ask via
        the list or contact me directly.

        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Edit Administration Officer
      • kasdira moonpheonyx
        For whomever my lucky editor may be (and for anyone else interested)=D I just wanted to let it to be known, that my pictures are posted to my OR - now
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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          For whomever my lucky editor may be (and for anyone else interested)=D

          I just wanted to let it to be known, that my pictures are posted to my OR - now available at a URL near you =D http://tinyurl.com/bws9p

          Jennifer ~*~kasdira~*~ Hay


          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • nazdarovye
          Jennifer - Great review; just a few edits, as noted below. Go ahead and repost the edited version with REPOST included in the subject line, and I should be
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 7, 2005
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            Jennifer -

            Great review; just a few edits, as noted below. Go ahead and repost
            the edited version with "REPOST" included in the subject line, and I
            should be able to approve this for upload right away.

            Regards,
            Steve
            BGT Edit Moderator

            [EDITS FOLLOW:]

            While I started my
            beginnings with the typical comforts of "car camping"; I have since
            began Ultralight Backpacking.
            ***EDITS: "my beginnings" is redundant; change semicolon to comman;
            "begun" instead of "began"

            Right now my current gear consists
            mainly of "Walmart specials", a few lucky finds from the Florida
            Trail Association's state conference auctions, and a birthday
            shopping spree on REI.
            ***EDIT: "at REI" unless you really do mean they paid for it

            c. Manufacturer website – www.earthshoe.com
            ***EDIT: I note in your HTML version that this is not a clickable link
            - be sure to make it one in your final version

            I found those dress shoes to be comfortable and not as
            tiring on my feet since my job required me to be standing for 8+
            hours everyday.
            ***EDIT: "every day"
            My history with the manufacturer pushed me more to
            consider these boots.

            The Earth Shoe Casa Women's Boots are predominately made of
            waterproof treated brown brushed leather, which appears to be glued
            to a black rubber sole that is 1 in. (2.54 cm) thick at the toe and
            gradually increases to 2 in. (5.08 cm).
            ***EDIT: no need for periods after "in" here and throughout the rest
            of the review

            In the hotter months my feet do not get too hot
            because of the boots breathing capabilities.
            ***EDIT" "boots'" (trailing apostrophe for possessive)

            Most of my hiking has taken place in the Northwest Florida area,
            which averages less than 50ft (12.7m) above sea level.
            ***EDIT: Add spaces between numbers and "ft" and "m" for consistency
            with other measures

            My hikes have been on terrain ranging from paved foot-trails and roadways,
            marshlands, dry and wet clay, heavy foliage, thick wiregrass, sandy
            trails and the occasional wooden walkways.
            ***EDIT: "ranging from" should have a "to..." clause following...or,
            you could reword this to say "terrain including..." and just use your
            list as you have it

            I also wore these into the river when
            refilling my nalgene bottle, so there was at least 3 in. (7.62 cm)
            moving water over the top area of the foot as well.
            ***EDITS: "Nalgene" as a proper name; remove period after "in" (I've
            not specifically pointed out all of those, but do correct them as you
            come across them)

            [END OF EDITS]
          • kasdira moonpheonyx
            Thanks, Steve, for your time to edit my OR. I have gone through and hope I have fixed those recommendations =D, and now showing at a URL near you,
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 8, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks, Steve, for your time to edit my OR. I have gone through and hope I have fixed those recommendations =D, and now showing at a URL near you, http://tinyurl.com/b828c my edited html as well =D . Thanks for your time.
              ~*~kasdira~*~



              Owner Review

              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots

              October 23, 2005



              Name: Jennifer "Kasdira" Hay

              Age: 29 years old

              Gender: Female

              Height: 5’ 4" (1.62 m)

              Weight: 198 lbs (90 kg)

              Shoe Size: 7 ½W US (6 UK)

              Email Address: kasdira@...

              City, State, Country: Pensacola, Florida USA



              Backpacking Background:

              My backpacking background is very limited to the last couple of years and to the Northwest Florida area. While I started with the typical comforts of "car camping", I have since found a love for Ultralight Backpacking. I like the idea of getting away – AS far away as my feet can take me. Right now my current gear consists mainly of "Walmart specials", a few lucky finds from the Florida Trail Association’s state conference auctions, and a birthday shopping spree at REI's online store.



              About my feet:

              I am a difficult person to get into shoes. I typically wear a 7-1/2W US (6 UK) size shoe – but because wide shoes can be difficult to find, I find myself in 8 and 8-1/2 (6 ½ - 7 UK) size shoes.



              Product Information -

              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots





              a. Manufacturer – Earth Shoe

              b. Year of Purchase – 2004

              c. Manufacturer website –www.earthshoe.com

              d. Listed weight – No Longer Available

              e. Weight as delivered – 2 lb 11 oz (1.23 kg) for the pair

              f. MSRP – No Longer Available

              g. Color - Tan



              Product Description

              I bought these boots in hopes of making my feet less tired when hiking. Prior to this purchase all I had hiked in was a pair of sneakers. I decided on trying the Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots because I had previously owned a couple pairs of their dress shoes for work. I found those dress shoes to be comfortable and not as tiring on my feet since my job required me to be standing for 8+ hours every day. My history with the manufacturer pushed me more to consider these boots.



              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots are predominately made of waterproof treated brown brushed leather, which appears to be glued to a black rubber sole that is 1 in (2.54 cm) thick at the toe and gradually increases to 2 in (5.08 cm). The boots also have an EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) midsole, which is used to give greater comfort. The lug pattern on the outsole is approximately .25 in (.64 cm) deep. The rolled cuff on the outside of the back ankle area has a small amount of an unknown synthetic black and brown basket-weave type material. The tongue is gusseted to the upper and covered with the same material as the rolled cuff and then topped with 2 small leather pieces. The

              liner is made of a synthetic black material designed to be moisture absorbing. The boots are laced through 10 D-rings across the top of the foot and secured at the ankle using four lace-hooks.



              Using the shoes straight out of the box, I did find some discomfort. This discomfort was not in the typical places, such as the toes or the heels. Instead when I first bought them, the top of the boots bit into the back of my Achilles tendons and left bruises on the back of my ankles. The only way I could wear the boots initially was to only lace them across the top of the foot, and not utilize the hooks across the ankles. After about a month or so, with some standing and squashing of the ankle area to make them less rigid, I was able to lace them completely up. Aside from my ankle issues, the rest of the boot is relatively comfortable. There is plenty of room for my toes and there is a sufficient amount

              of arch support; so I have never needed to use any aftermarket insoles. The padding in the wall of the boots appears to be adequate for the temperatures I typically hike. In the hotter months my feet do not get too hot because of the boots' breathing capabilities. In the colder months

              I find them to be warm enough for my liking. The laces that came with the shoes are 64 in (163 cm) long and made of the same black and

              brown material found on the boots. I have only used a traditional criss-cross lacing, because it provides adjustable comfort in the boots, and

              have not experimented with any other lacing method. The waterproof attributes have been tested in heavy downpours and wading through

              large puddles on the trail. The gusseting on the tongue has helped considerably to keep out pine needles, sand and other small annoyances.

              I have owned these boots for about a year and a half; while my hikes have been short distances, I have hiked a little over a hundred miles (161 km) in them. Throughout this usage I have not had any issues with blisters or other foot maladies.



              Specific Field Information

              Most of my hiking has taken place in the Northwest Florida area, which averages less than 50 ft (12.7 m) above sea level. My hikes have been on a variety of terrains to include: paved foot-trails and roadways, marshlands, dry and wet clay, heavy foliage, thick wiregrass, sandy trails and the occasional wooden walkways. I have worn them in a varying range of temperatures from 30 degrees F (-1 C) to 96 degrees F (36 C) (not including any heat index changes due to humidity).



              October of 2004, I had the perfect opportunity to test the soundness of the waterproof attributes. During a camping trip in the Northwest Florida area at Karick Lake – part of the Jackson Red Ground Trail - my companions and I were caught in a full-on torrential rain. The hour-long downpour left us standing in nearly 8 in (20.32 cm) of red clay-streaked murky water. My feet stayed dry for most of that time, until the water rose higher than the tops of my boots. With the water inside the boots, they quickly were beyond their saturation limit and I was shoeless for the remaining 36 hours of the campout. Because of the wonderful waterproof feature, the boots took a very long time to completely dry. Even with the boots tipped over on the openings, they took two weeks to fully dry out.



              In May of 2005, I had the opportunity to wear the boots in the Little Florida Mountains, in the southern part of New Mexico. The Rockhound State Park Trail was the highest I had ever hiked - averaging around 4500 ft (1350 m) above sea level. This area was predominately steep rocky surfaces with areas of caliche clay. I was there during a pleasant time of the year for the southwestern United States, so the temperature was about 90 degrees F (32 C) for most of my trip. Again the gusseted tongue proved to be useful in keeping out Goatheads (Tribulus terrestris), cactus needles, and small rocks. Climbing the rocky areas off the path was not too bad considering the small lugs on the sole of the boot. I did not find that this small lug size impeded my ability to get to higher places that were not as easily accessible as the rest of the footpath. I also found that my feet stayed considerably cool even while in this arid hotter climate.



              I utilized an overnight hike to the Blackwater River in October of 2005 as another attempt of testing the soundness of the waterproof capabilities. I tried to walk in as many stagnant puddles as possible to allow the water to rise around the top of the foot and even

              along the tongue area. I also wore these into the river when refilling my Nalgene bottle, so there was at least 3 in (7.62 cm) moving water over the top area of the foot as well. I was pleased to see that these shoes definitely held up with their waterproof characteristics

              in stationary as well as moving waters.





              Conclusion

              Overall, I am pleased with the Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boot. While I originally did not care for the stiffness in the rolled cuff on the ankles, I managed to overcome this little issue with time. I enjoy the comfort of the inner sole of the boots and their general weatherproof qualities. In the time that I have owned the boots, they show minimal wear. The outsole has worn evenly on the tread, and the glue has stayed intact with the upper even with all the water exposure. The only noticeable signs of aging are inside the shoe where the eyelets used to secure the lace hooks have a small amount of rust; this is quite possibly from the time the boots were completely waterlogged. The inner liner is completely intact and shows no signs of thinning.



              Pros/Cons Summary:

              Pro 1 – Comfortable inner sole and arches

              Pro 2 – Very much waterproof

              Pro 3 – Very durable





              Con 1 – Stiff ankle areas

              Con 2 – Takes a long time to dry out



              Owner Review

              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots

              October 23, 2005



              Name: Jennifer "Kasdira" Hay

              Age: 29 years old

              Gender: Female

              Height: 5’ 4" (1.62 m)

              Weight: 198 lbs (90 kg)

              Shoe Size: 7 ½W US (6 UK)

              Email Address: kasdira@...

              City, State, Country: Pensacola, Florida USA



              Backpacking Background:

              My backpacking background is very limited to the last couple of years and to the Northwest Florida area. While I started with the typical comforts of "car camping", I have since found a love for Ultralight Backpacking. I like the idea of getting away – AS far away as my feet can take me. Right now my current gear consists mainly of "Walmart specials", a few lucky finds from the Florida Trail Association’s state conference auctions, and a birthday shopping spree at REI's online store.



              About my feet:

              I am a difficult person to get into shoes. I typically wear a 7-1/2W US (6 UK) size shoe – but because wide shoes can be difficult to find, I find myself in 8 and 8-1/2 (6 ½ - 7 UK) size shoes.



              Product Information -

              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots





              a. Manufacturer – Earth Shoe

              b. Year of Purchase – 2004

              c. Manufacturer website –www.earthshoe.com

              d. Listed weight – No Longer Available

              e. Weight as delivered – 2 lb 11 oz (1.23 kg) for the pair

              f. MSRP – No Longer Available

              g. Color - Tan



              Product Description

              I bought these boots in hopes of making my feet less tired when hiking. Prior to this purchase all I had hiked in was a pair of sneakers. I decided on trying the Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots because I had previously owned a couple pairs of their dress shoes for work. I found those dress shoes to be comfortable and not as tiring on my feet since my job required me to be standing for 8+ hours every day. My history with the manufacturer pushed me more to consider these boots.



              The Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boots are predominately made of waterproof treated brown brushed leather, which appears to be glued to a black rubber sole that is 1 in (2.54 cm) thick at the toe and gradually increases to 2 in (5.08 cm). The boots also have an EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) midsole, which is used to give greater comfort. The lug pattern on the outsole is approximately .25 in (.64 cm) deep. The rolled cuff on the outside of the back ankle area has a small amount of an unknown synthetic black and brown basket-weave type material. The tongue is gusseted to the upper and covered with the same material as the rolled cuff and then topped with 2 small leather pieces. The

              liner is made of a synthetic black material designed to be moisture absorbing. The boots are laced through 10 D-rings across the top of the foot and secured at the ankle using four lace-hooks.



              Using the shoes straight out of the box, I did find some discomfort. This discomfort was not in the typical places, such as the toes or the heels. Instead when I first bought them, the top of the boots bit into the back of my Achilles tendons and left bruises on the back of my ankles. The only way I could wear the boots initially was to only lace them across the top of the foot, and not utilize the hooks across the ankles. After about a month or so, with some standing and squashing of the ankle area to make them less rigid, I was able to lace them completely up. Aside from my ankle issues, the rest of the boot is relatively comfortable. There is plenty of room for my toes and there is a sufficient amount

              of arch support; so I have never needed to use any aftermarket insoles. The padding in the wall of the boots appears to be adequate for the temperatures I typically hike. In the hotter months my feet do not get too hot because of the boots' breathing capabilities. In the colder months

              I find them to be warm enough for my liking. The laces that came with the shoes are 64 in (163 cm) long and made of the same black and

              brown material found on the boots. I have only used a traditional criss-cross lacing, because it provides adjustable comfort in the boots, and

              have not experimented with any other lacing method. The waterproof attributes have been tested in heavy downpours and wading through

              large puddles on the trail. The gusseting on the tongue has helped considerably to keep out pine needles, sand and other small annoyances.

              I have owned these boots for about a year and a half; while my hikes have been short distances, I have hiked a little over a hundred miles (161 km) in them. Throughout this usage I have not had any issues with blisters or other foot maladies.



              Specific Field Information

              Most of my hiking has taken place in the Northwest Florida area, which averages less than 50 ft (12.7 m) above sea level. My hikes have been on a variety of terrains to include: paved foot-trails and roadways, marshlands, dry and wet clay, heavy foliage, thick wiregrass, sandy trails and the occasional wooden walkways. I have worn them in a varying range of temperatures from 30 degrees F (-1 C) to 96 degrees F (36 C) (not including any heat index changes due to humidity).



              October of 2004, I had the perfect opportunity to test the soundness of the waterproof attributes. During a camping trip in the Northwest Florida area at Karick Lake – part of the Jackson Red Ground Trail - my companions and I were caught in a full-on torrential rain. The hour-long downpour left us standing in nearly 8 in (20.32 cm) of red clay-streaked murky water. My feet stayed dry for most of that time, until the water rose higher than the tops of my boots. With the water inside the boots, they quickly were beyond their saturation limit and I was shoeless for the remaining 36 hours of the campout. Because of the wonderful waterproof feature, the boots took a very long time to completely dry. Even with the boots tipped over on the openings, they took two weeks to fully dry out.



              In May of 2005, I had the opportunity to wear the boots in the Little Florida Mountains, in the southern part of New Mexico. The Rockhound State Park Trail was the highest I had ever hiked - averaging around 4500 ft (1350 m) above sea level. This area was predominately steep rocky surfaces with areas of caliche clay. I was there during a pleasant time of the year for the southwestern United States, so the temperature was about 90 degrees F (32 C) for most of my trip. Again the gusseted tongue proved to be useful in keeping out Goatheads (Tribulus terrestris), cactus needles, and small rocks. Climbing the rocky areas off the path was not too bad considering the small lugs on the sole of the boot. I did not find that this small lug size impeded my ability to get to higher places that were not as easily accessible as the rest of the footpath. I also found that my feet stayed considerably cool even while in this arid hotter climate.



              I utilized an overnight hike to the Blackwater River in October of 2005 as another attempt of testing the soundness of the waterproof capabilities. I tried to walk in as many stagnant puddles as possible to allow the water to rise around the top of the foot and even

              along the tongue area. I also wore these into the river when refilling my Nalgene bottle, so there was at least 3 in (7.62 cm) moving water over the top area of the foot as well. I was pleased to see that these shoes definitely held up with their waterproof characteristics

              in stationary as well as moving waters.





              Conclusion

              Overall, I am pleased with the Earth Shoe Casa Women’s Boot. While I originally did not care for the stiffness in the rolled cuff on the ankles, I managed to overcome this little issue with time. I enjoy the comfort of the inner sole of the boots and their general weatherproof qualities. In the time that I have owned the boots, they show minimal wear. The outsole has worn evenly on the tread, and the glue has stayed intact with the upper even with all the water exposure. The only noticeable signs of aging are inside the shoe where the eyelets used to secure the lace hooks have a small amount of rust; this is quite possibly from the time the boots were completely waterlogged. The inner liner is completely intact and shows no signs of thinning.



              Pros/Cons Summary:

              Pro 1 – Comfortable inner sole and arches

              Pro 2 – Very much waterproof

              Pro 3 – Very durable





              Con 1 – Stiff ankle areas

              Con 2 – Takes a long time to dry out






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