Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

REVISED: Owner Review - Eureka Solitaire Tent

Expand Messages
  • Irena Gershkovich
    Hi, Here is my Eureka Solitaire review again. I just fixed up some of the units and did some re-wording. ~Irena ... Eureka Solitaire Tent Reviewer Information
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 11, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,
      Here is my Eureka Solitaire review again. I just fixed up some of the units and did some re-wording.
      ~Irena

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Eureka Solitaire Tent

      Reviewer Information

      Name: Irena Gershkovich
      Age: 25
      Gender: Female
      Height: 5’ 4” (163 cm)
      Weight: 118 lbs (54 kg)
      Email address: igershko@...
      City, State, Country: Champaign, IL, USA
      Date: 7/6/05

      Backpacking Background: I started backpacking four
      years ago with a 10-day university guided backpacking
      trip to the Appalachian Mountains in North Carolina.
      I learned a lot from the guides, and since then have
      done several of my own backpacking and hiking trips in
      Oregon, Washington, Michigan, Illinois, and Hawaii.
      Most of the trips I’ve planned have been long weekend
      trips, but I hope to do more week-long backpacking and
      canoeing trips. I consider myself a three-season,
      lightweight backpacker (going ultra-light as we speak).
      I also mountain bike, ski,and go on winter day-hikes.

      Product Information

      Manufacturer: Eureka!
      Year of manufacture: 2001
      URL : http://www.eurekacamping.com/
      Listed weight: 2 lb 9 oz (1.16 kg)
      Weight as delivered: 3 lb 1 oz (1.39 kg)
      Price: $79

      Product description:

      The Eureka! Solitaire comes in a black stuff sack that
      has the “Eureka! Solitaire” logo printed boldly in yellow along its length.
      The Solitaire sleeps one person comfortably. The stuff sack is about the size
      of a large loaf of bread. Included in the package are:
      instruction sheets, 2 fiber-glass poles with a designated sack, 13
      stakes with a designated sack, the tent with an attached fly cover,
      short nylon cords, a long chord, a 2 oz (57 gm) bottle of seam
      sealer and the tent stuff sack. The tent struck me as
      being quite small and light considering the price that I payed.

      When pitched, the tent looks like an over-sized bivy
      sack. It is supported by two arched fiber-glass poles
      at both ends. The pole at the rear of the tent
      (towards the foot area) is smaller than the entrance
      area pole. The design requires the tent to be staked
      out--- it is not free-standing. The tent fly is
      attached to the larger arch (near the entrance) and
      can be rolled up for sleeping under the stars and
      ventilation.

      Setup

      I was able to pitch the tent just by glancing at the
      instruction diagrams--- the setup is pretty intuitive.
      I found the inside to be roomier than I expected from
      looking at the outside. There is enough space for
      someone bigger than me to sleep comfortably, but not
      much room to sit up. Also, entry into the tent can be
      kind of awkward. The recommended setup steps are to:
      - assemble the poles and insert them into the
      pole sleeves, larger pole first
      - place pins at the edges of the floor into pole
      ends
      - stake down the fly near the entrance
      - stake down the fly at the rear end
      - attach s-hooks on the fly’s shock cords to
      rings at back of the tent
      - stake down sides of the fly

      From my experiences, it is important to insert the
      poles before doing any staking. Besides that,
      variations on the recommended setup produce good
      results. The tent and its components fit easily into
      the stuff sack. I find this very convenient, though
      some may wish to pack it more compactly. On
      backpacking trips, I do not take the stuff sack, but
      rather spread the parts of the tent in convenient
      locations throughout my pack.

      Field Tests

      I have used this tent extensively over the past four
      years. It has been on countless car camping trips,
      and four backpacking trips. I have set it up and
      spent the night in it about 60 times. I’ve heard some
      complaints about the poles being flimsy and breaking,
      but I have not had any problems with mine. The ends
      of the fiberglass are getting a little splintered and
      rounded, but they are still functional.

      The first time I used the tent was on a long weekend
      car camping trip in Oregon's Mt. Hood Recreation Area. It rained, mostly
      drizzle and moderate, throughout the trip. I noticed
      no discomfort from the rain. There was some slight
      moisture at the sides of the tent, but my sleeping bag
      and I remained dry. The only discomfort I felt was in
      getting used to the small size of the tent. This was
      mainly because I had never slept in a solo tent.

      Since then the tent has been exposed to humid and hot
      Midwestern nights, cooler autumn nights, slight rains,
      as well as thunder storms. The tent has been pitched
      on soft and packed ground, as well as coral and rocks.
      It has held up well! However, I needed to use
      heavier duty stakes than were provided when I pitched
      it on coral in Key Largo. I usually pitch it on top
      of a light plastic tarp.

      I find it nice to be able to roll up the fly for
      ventilation on hot nights. However, it was kind of
      difficult for me to get out of the tent and secure the
      fly properly when it would begin to rain. The tent
      has proven to be very rain proof. The sides can
      sometimes get a bit wet, but it was easy for me to
      avoid leaning against them.

      Things I Like
      - Light for the price paid
      - Packs compactly
      - Roll-up fly
      - Keeps me dry

      Things I Don’t Like
      - Not enough room do much but sleep
      - Not free-standing

      Summary
      Overall, the Eureka! Solitaire is a great solo tent
      for those who are not claustrophobic. It is
      relatively light for a tent within its price range,
      rain-proof, and versatile in different weather
      conditions. It was my first tent and I would
      recommend it to anyone who wants a good, light,
      traditional tent for solo backpacking and camping.





      ---------------------------------
      Do you Yahoo!?
      Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Christine
      Hi Irena. Welcome to BGT! We re glad to have you aboard. Thanks for adding the metric conversions in your revision. Since this is your first OR, I ve got
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 11, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Irena.

        Welcome to BGT! We're glad to have you aboard. Thanks for adding
        the metric conversions in your revision. Since this is your first
        OR, I've got quite a few edits for you. We want you to go through
        the pain now so that your next ORs will be a breeze. Mostly, I'd
        like you to add more description to the report. Describe the tent.
        Describe how you set it up. I don't get a good picture in my mind of
        what the tent looks like or how it's different from other tents.

        I'm sure you've found these, but if not, you may also want to consult
        the Owner Review Checklist and the Quick Start Guide at the following
        two links:
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?lesson=OwnerReview&page=1
        http://www.backpackgeartest.org/lesson.php?
        lesson=QuickStartGuide&page=1

        Once you have revised your review please post it to the list with the
        word REPOST added to the subject line.

        Thanks for all your hard work!

        Christine
        BGT Editor
        _________________________

        Eureka Solitaire Tent

        **EDIT: Add "Owner Review" to the title

        Reviewer Information

        Weight: 118 lbs (54 kg)

        **EDIT: Later in the report you use "lb". Use one or the other
        throughout. See http://www.backpackgeartest.org/convert.html (scroll
        to the bottom) for the BGT standards.

        City, State, Country: Champaign, IL, USA

        **EDIT: Spell out state abbreviations for our international readers.

        Backpacking Background:
        I also mountain bike, ski,and go on winter day-hikes.

        **EDIT: Space between "ski," and "and"

        Product Information

        **EDIT: Here or in the text give measurements of the tent packed and
        set up.

        Price: $79

        **EDIT: Indicate this is US dollars. Example: US $79

        Product description:
        The stuff sack is about the size of a large loaf of bread.

        **EDIT: Since bread doesn't come in standard units, we prefer actual
        measurements.

        2 fiber-glass poles

        **EDIT: fiberglass (here and later on)
        **EDIT: are the poles shock-corded? How many sections to each
        pole? What is the length of the poles when packed?

        the tent with an attached fly cover,

        **EDIT: what materials are used for the tent and fly?

        short nylon cords, a long chord,

        **EDIT: "cord"
        **EDIT: are these the shock cords you refer to later? How many
        short cords? What are they used for?

        a 2 oz (57 gm) bottle

        **EDIT: Abbreviation for gram is "g"

        considering the price that I payed.

        **EDIT: "paid"

        It is supported by two arched fiber-glass poles at both ends.

        **EDIT: This sentence makes me think there are four poles.
        Suggested wording "...two arched fiberglass poles, one on each end."
        **EDIT: Later you mention pole sleeves. Talk about those here. Do
        they completely enclose the poles or are there also hooks that attach
        the tent to the poles? Are there grommets at the base of the tent
        that the pole ends click into? Is this where the pins come in?

        The pole at the rear of the tent(towards the foot area) is smaller
        than the entrance
        area pole.

        **EDIT: Please give the height of the tent at the foot and head.
        **EDIT: Are there hooks to hold the rolled-up fly? Does the tent
        have mesh walls/ceiling?
        **EDIT: Are there vents in the tent?
        **EDIT: Please describe the tent some more. How many doors?
        Windows? Interior pockets? What color is the tent? Fly? How does
        the fly set up? Does it attach to the tent or tent poles at the
        base? Is there a vestibule when the fly is up? How big is it? What
        can you fit in there?


        Setup
        There is enough space for someone bigger than me to sleep
        comfortably, but not much room to sit up.

        **EDIT: In BGT reports, say what you did and avoid talking about
        other people's experiences. Change this to "There is enough space
        for me to sleep comfortably..." Do you bring your pack in with you?
        What do you do with your boots?

        Also, entry into the tent can be kind of awkward.

        **EDIT: Elaborate. What about entry is awkward?

        The recommended setup steps are to:

        **EDIT: Instead of or in addition to quoting the steps from the
        manufacturer, walk us though setting up the tent. Describe the
        steps. There are several areas where you lose me.

        - place pins at the edges of the floor into pole ends

        **EDIT: I don't understand what you mean by this. What are the
        pins? What do they do?

        - attach s-hooks on the fly's shock cords to rings at back of the tent

        **EDIT: Did the s-hooks come with the tent? They're not in the
        equipment list. Are these the cords listed above? Are the shock
        cords attached permanently to the fly? Describe the rings.

        Besides that, variations on the recommended setup produce good
        results.

        **EDIT: Describe the variations.
        **EDIT: Do you use all 13 stakes? What is the minimum number of
        stakes needed?

        though some may wish to pack it more compactly.

        **EDIT: Only talk about your experiences. Do you wish it packed
        more compactly?


        Field Tests

        **EDIT: This is a review and not a test so a more appropriate
        heading would be "Field Conditions"
        **EDIT: Add the elevation and temperature ranges in which you've
        used the tent.

        I've heard some complaints about the poles being flimsy and breaking,
        but I have not had any problems with mine.

        **EDIT: Again, only talk about your experiences. I'd remove the
        first part of the sentence.

        The ends of the fiberglass are getting a little splintered and
        rounded, but they are still functional.

        **EDIT: Are there plastic or metal tips on the end of your poles?

        There was some slight moisture at the sides of the tent,

        **EDIT: Why do you think there was moisture in the tent? Does the
        fly not cover completely? Condensation?

        slight rains, as well as thunder storms.

        **EDIT: "thunderstorms"

        However, I needed to use heavier duty stakes than were provided when
        I pitched
        it on coral in Key Largo.

        **EDIT: Please describe the stakes that came with the tent here or
        above. Why did you need heavier stakes? Did the ones provided
        bend?

        **EDIT: Have you noticed any wear on the tent? Rips, tears, stains,
        worn spots, frayed seams? Did you seal the seams with the sealant
        provided?

        The sides can sometimes get a bit wet, but it was easy for me to
        avoid leaning against them.

        **EDIT: Is this from rain or condensation?

        Things I Don't Like
        - Not enough room do much but sleep

        **EDIT: "...room TO do..."

        Summary
        Overall, the Eureka! Solitaire is a great solo tent for those who are
        not claustrophobic.

        **EDIT: Again, only talk from your experiences. "...great solo tent
        for me because I'm not claustrophobic."

        versatile in different weather conditions.

        **EDIT: Describe this versatility when you talk about the tent above.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.