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OR - Osprey Crescent 90 backpack

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  • mountain_freak07
    Reviewer Bio Name: Cody Marchessault Age: 21 Gender: Male Height: 6 1 Weight: 155lbs Torso: 21 Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA Background: Having been
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1 1:11 PM
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      Reviewer Bio

      Name: Cody Marchessault
      Age: 21
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6'1"
      Weight: 155lbs
      Torso: 21"
      Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA



      Background:
      Having been raised in the Santa Cruz Mountains I feel very at home
      outside and playing in nature. I have been hiking since I was
      conceived, but I have only recently taken up backpacking (2001).
      My first expedition was to Alaska. My aquaculture teacher and three
      other students organized a fishing trip to Angoon AK. We spent two
      glorious weeks living on an uninhabited island, aside from the
      eagles, fishing and just living it up.
      Over the next few years I went to Yosemite, Big Sur, Big Basin,
      Pinnacles, Desolation Wilderness/PCT, car camped Shasta many times,
      and various places in Oregon.
      My next experience, not car camping, would come much later in 2004
      when a friend of mine and I went to Europe. We went to five counties
      in one month; England, France, Holland, Switzerland, Italy. That trip
      opened my eyes to just how dynamic this planet and its people really
      are. We explored Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland, for about four days. We
      hiked up to Gimmelwald, and I did a forty-mile hike in about eight
      and a half hours (I don't believe it either).
      I currently attend Cabrillo College, but I am transferring to UCSC
      this fall. After UCSC I plan to go to Alaska to get certified in
      outdoor education (http://www.uas.alaska.edu/ods/program/index.htm).
      I also work for the City Of Santa Cruz Water Dep., at the local
      reservoir, Loch Lomond.

      Skills: Backpacking, hiking, bouldering, fishing, mountain biking.


      Product:
      Osprey Crescent 90

      Features:
      - 2 side pockets
      - 2 top pockets
      - Ice axe loops
      - Front and top loading
      - Extremely comfortable hip belt/shoulder straps
      - Tough rugged design limits opportunity for damage
      - Suspension is perfectly balanced
      - Vertical zippered access to main compartment under
      compression flap
      - Hydration pocket in convertible top lid/fanny pack
      - Solo Accessory is standard equipment
      - Easy access sleeping bag compartment

      Specs

      Specification Description
      Material Nylon
      Approximate volume 5,500 - 5,900 cubic inches
      Fits torso 18 - 22+ inches
      Number of pockets 5 + main compartment
      Number of stays 2
      Frame material Polyethylene/aluminum
      Average weight 6 lbs. 13 oz. - 7 lbs. 5 oz.
      Hydration compatible Yes
      Access / Loading Top, front
      Sleeping bag compartment Yes
      · Medium - 18 to 20.5 in. / 5,500 cu. in. / 6 lbs. 13 oz.
      · Large - 20 to 22.5 in. / 5,700 cu. in. / 7 lbs. 1 oz.
      · X-Large - 22+ in. / 5,900 cu. in. / 7 lbs. 5 oz.
      (Above via REI.com)

      Description:
      The Crescent 90 is a light and durable pack. The shoulder and hip
      straps are easily adjustable not only when standing still but when in
      motion as well. The two top pockets are perfect for maps, and other
      quick access items needed without taking off the pack. The two side
      pockets are a bit small for anything other than a headlamp, lighter,
      knife, and a few energy bars. The daypack is very useful, small and
      light it fits extra cloths, and can carry everything you need for
      exertions away from your base camp. Although the solo has to be
      detached from the pack via buttons, which can be time consuming, it
      is an over all perk. After removing the solo there is a front zipper
      to the main compartment so you don't have to go through the top.
      There is a thin barrier between the main compartment and the bottom
      compartment that is not very secure. The sides allow gear to slip
      between easily.


      Experience:
      I used the Crescent 90 pack on my Europe trip in 2004. Before leaving
      for Europe my only concern was its ability to fit on the overhead
      racks. To my surprise it fit like a glove on every train I took it
      slipped easily onto the racks. While on the Trains the solo provided
      me with all the things I needed for the ride. I fit a notebook, long-
      sleeved shirt, a mini-disc player and discs, food/snacks, and my
      camera in the solo; I also was able to strap my nalgene bottle to the
      outside. In the main compartment was my sierra designs Orion AST, my
      sleeping bag (summer weight), an MSR mini works, a North Face fleece
      lined rain shell, a North Face Denali-Pro fleece, my cook set/MSR
      mini stove plus fuel, five t-shirts, and thermal, a pair of shorts,
      two pairs of pants, a sweatshirt, binoculars, sandals, and my
      sleeping pad with nothing but my water strapped to the outside. As
      you can see this pack is a loadmaster, the shoulder straps and hip
      belt contour to fit your body and mold to your waist. I trekked
      across five major European cities and not once did I bet a bruise, or
      sore spot.
      A few weeks after getting back from Europe I took a trip to
      Desolation Wilderness CA. This is an extremely rugged area. Mostly
      granite shards make up the trails and there is no flat section to
      speak of. The trip was small (3 nights) but the pack made it
      pleasant. The straps easily adjusted to my needs as the slope changed
      without having to stop or waste time. Once again Osprey's
      suspension
      engineering genius was felt. After ten miles up and down the though
      terrain my back and shoulders were in great shape.


      Likes:
      - Comfortable harness
      - Hydration compatible
      - Large compartments


      Dislikes:
      - Solo can be tough to detach
      - Hydration compartment is thin and awkward
      - Side pockets are small
      - Could use side straps for pols
    • chcoa
      Hello Cody, PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT! Thanks for your Owner s Review. It has been added to the Owner Review Queue and will be
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 2 10:53 PM
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        Hello Cody,

        PLEASE READ THIS EMAIL IN FULL. IT IS MOST IMPORTANT!

        Thanks for your Owner's Review. It has been added to the Owner
        Review Queue and will be picked up by an Edit Moderator soon. Do not
        worry if nothing happens with it for several days. All our Editors
        are volunteers and your report will be subject to an official edit
        within fourteen days. If you have not had a response from an Edit
        Moderator via the Yahoo Groups list within this timeframe, please let
        me know directly at jdeben@....

        To assist in this process, if this is your first Owner Review we ask
        that you post only ONE Owner Review for edit at a time. Our
        experience is that it is more efficient for both the Editors and
        yourself, if you post your first review, have it edited, approved and
        uploaded before you post your second and subsequent reviews. This
        way we can work with you on addressing any standard BGT policy edits
        which you can incorporate into your second and subsequent reviews
        before submission.

        If you are new to BackpackGearTest.org, welcome to the community!
        The Editors will work with you, within their own time constraints, to
        get your first two Owner Reviews approved and upload in a timely
        manner. Once these first two Owner Reviews have been approved and
        you have submitted your Tester Agreement you will be eligible to
        start applying for Tests.

        You may receive edits or comments from other members of the group.
        These edits and comments, while not official, should be considered
        carefully, and if you find them substantial, revise and re-post your
        review. Incorporating member edits and re-submitting to the list will
        usually result in a better review, as well as making things easier
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        your re-submitted review, if you take this route or make any changes
        to your review BEFORE the review has been taken by an Edit Moderator.

        Additionally, it is important for you to monitor the Yahoo Groups
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        Regards
        Jamie DeBenedetto
        Edit Administration Officer
      • edwardripleyduggan
        Hello Cody, Thanks for posting your OR. I do recommend taking a look at the BGT survival guide at http://www.backpackgeartest.org/requirements.php if you have
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 10 8:09 AM
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          Hello Cody,

          Thanks for posting your OR. I do recommend taking a look at the BGT
          survival guide at

          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/requirements.php

          if you have not done so. This is in the final stages of revision so
          some critical points are omitted, but it may help clarify some points.

          Your review is an interesting one. I should stress that packs (along
          with tents) are among the hardest items of gear to review correctly.
          My notes below (for the moment) deal with overall structural problems
          in the review, rather than specific details of wording. Please read my
          annotations through carefully (I apologize for any typos *I* may have
          made).<g>

          Many first-time reviewers prefer to take a simple piece of gear for
          their first or second reviews, so that they may master the basic
          concepts and requirements of BGT. I think we can still, with a great
          deal of work on both our parts, get a good review from your
          submission, but it will be significantly different from its present
          form. It may in fact prove far less frustrating, given the extent of
          the changes needed, to begin over with a simpler item, using the
          corrections I have provided as a guide to what you should be doing,
          but this must be your decision. For what it's worth, my first OR was a
          pack!

          Additionally, we do have a mentoring program, where an experienced
          reviewer can work one-on-one with you to help you generate a BGT
          review, and I feel that you might benefit from that. Still do take a
          shot at resubmitting this review with the initial changes I have
          indicated (understand that there will be more rounds of editing to
          come). If I feel that we are moving quickly in the right direction, I
          will be happy to help you complete it. If I feel you are stumbling a
          little (and this is no reflection on you--as I say, this is a hard
          review you have chosen for a first effort), I may advise you to
          consider mentoring.

          Very best,

          Ted

          (Edward Ripley-Duggan)

          BGT OR Editor


          > Reviewer Bio
          >
          > Name: Cody Marchessault
          > Age: 21
          > Gender: Male
          > Height: 6'1"
          > Weight: 155lbs
          > Torso: 21"
          > Location: Santa Cruz, California, USA

          ### We now require metric equivalents for all measurements. There is a
          metric converter designed for BGT purposes at

          http://www.backpackgeartest.org/convert.html

          Please take a look at the bottom of the page, which lists the
          permitted unit abbreviations (see "abbreviation" column). Note that we
          request no period after the unit designation. So, in your table above:

          Height: 6' 1", 1.83 m
          Weight: 155 lb, 70 kg
          Torso: 21", 53 cm

          Note that we put a space between the integer and the unit. This is the
          customary layout.
          >
          >
          >
          > Background:
          > Having been raised in the Santa Cruz Mountains I feel very at home
          > outside and playing in nature. I have been hiking since I was
          > conceived, but I have only recently taken up backpacking (2001).
          > My first expedition was to Alaska. My aquaculture teacher and three
          > other students organized a fishing trip to Angoon AK. We spent two
          > glorious weeks living on an uninhabited island, aside from the
          > eagles, fishing and just living it up.
          > Over the next few years I went to Yosemite, Big Sur, Big Basin,
          > Pinnacles, Desolation Wilderness/PCT, car camped Shasta many times,
          > and various places in Oregon.
          > My next experience, not car camping, would come much later in 2004
          > when a friend of mine and I went to Europe. We went to five counties
          > in one month; England, France, Holland, Switzerland, Italy. That trip
          > opened my eyes to just how dynamic this planet and its people really
          > are. We explored Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland, for about four days. We
          > hiked up to Gimmelwald, and I did a forty-mile hike in about eight
          > and a half hours (I don't believe it either).
          > I currently attend Cabrillo College, but I am transferring to UCSC
          > this fall. After UCSC I plan to go to Alaska to get certified in
          > outdoor education (http://www.uas.alaska.edu/ods/program/index.htm).
          > I also work for the City Of Santa Cruz Water Dep., at the local
          > reservoir, Loch Lomond.
          >
          > Skills: Backpacking, hiking, bouldering, fishing, mountain biking.

          ### This is a wonderful account. In due course, BGT will, I believe,
          have a section of tester profiles, and I would recommend saving this
          section for that time.

          However, for reviews we are currently asking for a biography of 100
          words or less, which should indicate to the reader your overall level
          of experience (including number of years backpacking and hiking), as
          well as the kind of trips you undertake (with a specimen example or
          two, if you wish), plus your style of backpacking e.g. ultra-light,
          kitchen sink, or somewhere in between.

          Please prepare something in this vein. You might look at the BGT site
          for examples of reviews as guides. Those of Cora Hussey (now Shea),
          Stephanie Martin, Shane Steinkamp, James Triplett and many other
          long-time BGT members make good models (even, perhaps my own)! Reviews
          from 2004 on generally conform to the current BGT standards, which
          have evolved considerably, and those are what you should take as
          examples.

          >
          >
          > Product:
          > Osprey Crescent 90
          >
          > Features:
          > - 2 side pockets
          > - 2 top pockets
          > - Ice axe loops
          > - Front and top loading
          > - Extremely comfortable hip belt/shoulder straps
          > - Tough rugged design limits opportunity for damage
          > - Suspension is perfectly balanced
          > - Vertical zippered access to main compartment under
          > compression flap
          > - Hydration pocket in convertible top lid/fanny pack
          > - Solo Accessory is standard equipment
          > - Easy access sleeping bag compartment
          >
          > Specs
          >
          > Specification Description
          > Material Nylon
          > Approximate volume 5,500 - 5,900 cubic inches
          > Fits torso 18 - 22+ inches
          > Number of pockets 5 + main compartment
          > Number of stays 2
          > Frame material Polyethylene/aluminum
          > Average weight 6 lbs. 13 oz. - 7 lbs. 5 oz.
          > Hydration compatible Yes
          > Access / Loading Top, front
          > Sleeping bag compartment Yes
          > · Medium - 18 to 20.5 in. / 5,500 cu. in. / 6 lbs. 13 oz.
          > · Large - 20 to 22.5 in. / 5,700 cu. in. / 7 lbs. 1 oz.
          > · X-Large - 22+ in. / 5,900 cu. in. / 7 lbs. 5 oz.
          > (Above via REI.com)

          ### The list of details pertaining to the pack is extensive. However,
          much of this comes straight from the REI site. This isn't altogether
          what we need, though it's perhaps OK to use the REI list to jog your
          memory on to the crucial points of the pack.

          Take the matter of the weight of the pack for example. If you are
          going to quote weights, I would like to see the weight as it is listed
          on the manufacturer's site (not REI, a secondary source); in addition,
          we definitely want to know, for comparison's sake, what your pack
          weighs (stating any mods that you might have made). We only need to
          know the manufacturer's stated capacity for your size pack (presumably
          the large); as this is something that's difficult to measure, the
          manufacturer statement is adequate here. In this, as in all sections,
          metric equivalents are required where appropriate.


          >
          > Description:
          > The Crescent 90 is a light and durable pack. The shoulder and hip
          > straps are easily adjustable not only when standing still but when in
          > motion as well. The two top pockets are perfect for maps, and other
          > quick access items needed without taking off the pack. The two side
          > pockets are a bit small for anything other than a headlamp, lighter,
          > knife, and a few energy bars. The daypack is very useful, small and
          > light it fits extra cloths, and can carry everything you need for
          > exertions away from your base camp. Although the solo has to be
          > detached from the pack via buttons, which can be time consuming, it
          > is an over all perk. After removing the solo there is a front zipper
          > to the main compartment so you don't have to go through the top.
          > There is a thin barrier between the main compartment and the bottom
          > compartment that is not very secure. The sides allow gear to slip
          > between easily.

          ### The description is quite good. It will need some editing but I
          want to address the other areas of concern in the review first.
          Following the Description, I'd like to see a section of the
          environments and conditions in which you have used the pack. To what
          elevations? In what climate conditions? These are matters that help
          the reader decide if your review matches their pattern of use. You can
          incorporate the text at the end of ""Description" or break it out as
          "Field conditions" or something of the kind, but this does need to be
          present.

          >
          >
          > Experience:
          > I used the Crescent 90 pack on my Europe trip in 2004. Before leaving
          > for Europe my only concern was its ability to fit on the overhead
          > racks. To my surprise it fit like a glove on every train I took it
          > slipped easily onto the racks. While on the Trains the solo provided
          > me with all the things I needed for the ride. I fit a notebook, long-
          > sleeved shirt, a mini-disc player and discs, food/snacks, and my
          > camera in the solo; I also was able to strap my nalgene bottle to the
          > outside. In the main compartment was my sierra designs Orion AST, my
          > sleeping bag (summer weight), an MSR mini works, a North Face fleece
          > lined rain shell, a North Face Denali-Pro fleece, my cook set/MSR
          > mini stove plus fuel, five t-shirts, and thermal, a pair of shorts,
          > two pairs of pants, a sweatshirt, binoculars, sandals, and my
          > sleeping pad with nothing but my water strapped to the outside. As
          > you can see this pack is a loadmaster, the shoulder straps and hip
          > belt contour to fit your body and mold to your waist. I trekked
          > across five major European cities and not once did I bet a bruise, or
          > sore spot.
          > A few weeks after getting back from Europe I took a trip to
          > Desolation Wilderness CA. This is an extremely rugged area. Mostly
          > granite shards make up the trails and there is no flat section to
          > speak of. The trip was small (3 nights) but the pack made it
          > pleasant. The straps easily adjusted to my needs as the slope changed
          > without having to stop or waste time. Once again Osprey's
          > suspension
          > engineering genius was felt. After ten miles up and down the though
          > terrain my back and shoulders were in great shape.

          ### Your "Experience" section, which is really the critical part of
          the review, omits many things I'd like to see. For example, I see no
          assessment of wear. Maybe there is none, but this should be mentioned.
          There are many other ommissions.

          You also move between "my" and "your." The latter is what we term
          projection, and is a no-no in good reviews (for BGT or anywhere else).
          You are in effect telling the reader what *they* will experience,
          rather than recounting your experiences.

          >
          >
          > Likes:
          > - Comfortable harness
          > - Hydration compatible
          > - Large compartments
          >
          >
          > Dislikes:
          > - Solo can be tough to detach
          > - Hydration compartment is thin and awkward
          > - Side pockets are small
          > - Could use side straps for pols
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