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Revised - Red Ledge Thunderlight Escape Jacket IR

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  • Rob Patterson
    Thanks Todd for your edit, I really apreciate it. Anyway here is my revised IR, the only question I have is do I really need to say what type of gear it is, I
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 30, 2004
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      Thanks Todd for your edit, I really apreciate it. Anyway here is my revised
      IR, the only question I have is do I really need to say what type of gear it
      is, I think most anyone who finds it under the rainwear link would be able
      to figure out what it is w/o any real effort. Anyway my revised reopt can
      aslo be seen here:
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/test/TESTS/Red%20Ledge%20Thunderlight%20Escape%20Jacket%20IR/.
      Cheers: Rob


      Red Ledge Thunderlight Escape Jacket � Initial Report

      Product information:
      Manufacturer: Red Ledge
      Type of Product: lightweight rain Jacket
      Year of manufacture: 2004
      Website: www.redledge.com
      MSRP: $70 USD
      Weight: 16 oz. (454 g.)
      Weight as tested: 15.125 oz (428.8 g.) for the jacket and 1.5 oz. (42.52 g.)
      for the included stuff sack. Total weight 16.5 oz (468 g.)

      Product description:
      Overall: The Jacket is a lightweight hip length and somewhat baggily cut,
      seam sealed jacket with 3 pockets, pit zips, and a roll away hood. After
      looking at the catalogue description and other reviews online the jacket
      meets my expectations, and there were no real surprises. There are no
      reinforcements on the jacket, and while the body will easily accommodate a
      200 weight fleece worn under it the collar is too tight for me to zip the
      fleece and jacket up all the way without me choking myself in it. The jacket
      comes in a matching mesh stuff sack, with a reinforced bottom, key clip on
      the side, and shock corded opening. The overall look and feel of the jacket
      places it as a mildly technical and somewhat baggy jacket.
      Zippers and Fabric: The jacket itself features a double storm flapped and 2
      way main zipper (all the zippers are good quality & light weight YKK ones
      and have pull taps) that looks like it could hold most weather out, the
      storm flaps are secured by Velcro. Made of a lightweight albeit noisy
      rip-stop nylon the Jacket features a fairly impressive factory DWR*, and a
      slick inner coating.
      Pockets: The jacket also features 3 pockets, the first of which is an angled
      napoleon pockets on the fount left hand side, which is secured by a
      water-resistant zipper topped by a zipper garage (a little pocket to shelter
      the slider and top of the zipper from rain). While the other two pockets
      (covered by storm flaps) are located near the hem, and perfectly situated
      for shoving my hands in during bad weather. Although my pack hip belt
      doesn�t interfere with the pocket zippers, the bottom 1 inch (2-4 cm) or so
      of the pockets are squished when wearing a pack hip belt with it. All the
      pockets are generously sized, easily accessible, backed by more of the shell
      material, and fronted with a polyester mesh (which sadly means they can�t be
      used for venting).
      Pit Zips and Sleeves: The pit zips in turn are covered by a single
      unvelcroed storm flap; and feature one slider which runs from the bottom of
      my armpit to just beyond my elbows. The jacket has full length sleeves
      secured at the end with Velcro and elastic and are cut long enough that they
      pull back only a little when I reach overhead, the same can not be said for
      the hem which rides up a fair bit when I do so.
      Hem: The hem is secured by a elastic shock cord, which is adjusted through
      two cord locks mounted at the sides of my waist and attached to the jacket
      with a fine piece of webbing. Adjusting the hem is a simple matter of
      pulling on the shock cord or releasing the toggles with one hand. As far as
      I can tell the hem cord sits below my hip belt when wearing it with a pack.
      Hood: The collar of the jacket is lined with a lightweight fleece and is
      quite snug. The jacket�s hood easily rolls into and out of the collar, and
      can easily be detached via the small coil zipper attaching it to the rest of
      the jacket. It features an overhanging unstiffened brim, and is relatively
      adjustable. While nowhere near big enough to hold a climbing, bike or ski
      helmet, the hood can be easily tightened around the face via a sweatshirt
      style cord (not equipped with cord locks), as well as pulled back or forward
      along the head via a Velcro tab system located near the base of my skull, or
      tightened around my head (so that it moves with my head and improves
      peripheral vision) via a shock cord and toggle system that runs from my
      temples to it�s exit at the back of my head (although I find this system
      does more to pull the hood back off my head then tighten it to it).

      My take on the Jacket:
      The jacket arrived at my door step inside a cardboard box bearing
      a sticker declaring that it had been opened by Canada Customs. Despite the
      mangled appearance of the box, the jacket inside its plastic wrap arrived in
      perfect condition, bearing hangtags for both the jacket and Teflon Fabric
      protector. Looking at the jacket in my hands it was peaty much what I was
      expecting after looking at the catalogue description and other reviews
      online, and I didn�t find any real surprises.
      While the jacket is definitely a lightweight piece, it does
      appear heavy enough to take some light abuse. Also while the fit of the
      jacket while ok, it is a little boxy and baggy on my 5�9 (1.6 m) 150 lb (68
      Kg) frame, but overall in line with other lower priced waterproof/breathable
      jackets on the market. Moreover while the workmanship on the jacket is not
      all that impressive, it is perfectly adequate and in line with what I would
      expect for a 70 USD waterproof/breathable jacket. Overall I�d say that it
      looks like a fairly inexpensive, lightweight rain jacket and I�m defiantly
      looking forward to putting it through its paces.

      Test Strategy:
      During the next six months, I plan to make the Thunderlight
      Escape my everyday jacket, exposing it to everything from wind, to rain, to
      sleet, to snow, and even to the inside of my knapsack, and plan to report on
      its performance, fit, durability, and the usefulness of its features under
      varying conditions. More specifically I plan to use it while biking/walking
      around town, working part time guiding sea kayak daytrips, and as well as
      while hiking and skiing throughout Southern Ontario over the next six
      months.

      Personal information:
      Name: Rob Patterson
      Age: 20
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5 feet 9 inches (1.6 m)
      Weight: 150 pounds (68 kg)
      Email address: : robpatterson5@h... or robpatterson5<at> hotmail
      <dot>com
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Date: June 26, 2003
      Backpacking Background: I'm an avid Canadian backpacker, and have hiked
      through
      Algonquin Park, part of the Caribou range in B.C., and part of the Northern
      Lake Superior trail. I am also an avid day hiker, on the Bruce Trail, near
      Toronto, and along the Niagara Escarpment. My whole family often goes on day
      hikes,
      and normally covers 10-12 km (6 to 7.5 miles) a day. I also Skate Ski
      competitively, along with using classic cross-country skies to access
      otherwise inaccessible trails in the winter. Beyond that, I am an
      occasional whitewater canoeist. During the last five summers I
      have collected over 200 days of hiking and canoeing, in isolated wilderness
      areas. As well as working sales in a high end backpacking
      shop. I tend to be a mid-weight backpacker but am trying to par down my
      load. As the Canadian woods in the summer can get pretty buggy, I've always
      used a tent, tenting it into my 80L (4700 cu in) backpack. Because of school
      most of my trips happen over the summer, but I make up for this in part by
      spending at least half of it camping.



      * DWR, a fabric treatment which allows water to bead up and run off the
      surface, eventually this will wear out but it can be replenished with a
      number of different treatments, personally I recommend the Grangers one.

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    • Todd
      Good job - a few minor nits & you re good to go. -Todd Overall: The Jacket is a lightweight hip length and somewhat baggily cut, seam sealed jacket with 3
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 1, 2004
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        Good job - a few minor nits & you're good to go.

        -Todd

        Overall: The Jacket is a lightweight hip length and somewhat baggily
        cut, seam sealed jacket with 3 pockets, pit zips, and a roll away
        hood.
        NIT: put a comma after lightweight

        Pockets: The jacket also features 3 pockets, the first of which is
        an angled napoleon pockets on the fount left hand side,
        EDIT: Change `fount' to `front'

        Hem: The hem is secured by a elastic shock cord, which is adjusted
        through two cord locks mounted at the sides of my waist and attached
        to the jacket with a fine piece of webbing.
        EDIT: change `a elastic' to `an elastic'

        Looking at the jacket in my hands it was peaty much what I was
        expecting after looking at the catalogue description and other
        reviews online, and I didn't find any real surprises.
        EDIT: change `peaty' to `pretty'
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