Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

H20 Amigo IR - Christine

Expand Messages
  • Christine
    Hi Jim, It s getting late, so I hope I don t have too many stupid mistakes in here for you. ______________________ H20 Amigo Gravity Filter Personal
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 27, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Jim,

      It's getting late, so I hope I don't have too many stupid mistakes in
      here for you.

      ______________________
      H20 Amigo Gravity Filter

      Personal Information:
      Name: Christine Korhonen
      Age: 30
      Gender: female
      Height: 5'4" (1.6 m)
      Weight: 165 lb (75 kg)
      E-mail: chris@...
      Location: Western Montana
      Date: July 27, 2003

      Backpacking Background:
      I'm in Montana where I'm enjoying the summers and becoming re-
      acquainted with winter. Now that I'm back above the snow line, I've
      attempted some winter camping and snowshoeing. I'm a lightweight
      backpacker mentally, if not always in practice. I've gotten my
      summer multi-day pack weight down to 13 lb (6 kg), but winter
      backpacking is still new to me, and my winter pack weight hovers
      around 25 lb (11 kg).

      Product Information:
      Manufacturer: ULA Equipment (Ultralight Adventure Equipment)
      URL: www.ula-equipment.com
      Item: H20 Amigo
      MSRP: US $40
      Year of Manufacturer: 2004
      Listed volume: 1.25 gal (4.7 L)
      Measured volume: 1.25 gal (4.7 L)
      Listed weight filter system: 7.5 oz (213 g)
      Measured weight filter system: 8.8 oz (249 g) - weight includes some
      water since I weighed the filter after I used it
      filter: 4.0 oz (113 g)
      water bag & valve: 3.2 oz (91 g)
      hoses: 1.6 oz (45 g)
      stuffsack: 1.0 oz (28 g)
      flush bulb: 1.0 oz (28 g)
      Listed total weight: 9.25 oz (262 g)
      Measured total weight: 10.8 oz (306 g)

      H20 Amigo Description:
      The H20 Amigo is a gravity feed water filtration system. The system
      consists of a water bag with pre-filter, an in-line carbon cartridge
      filter, and silicon tubing. The cartridge filter is also sold
      separately by ULA under the name WaterWise Inline Filter. It has a
      0.2 micron pore size, contains activated carbon, and is advertised to
      remove 99.8% of waterborne contaminants. A replacement filter
      cartridge costs $22 US through ULA.

      Documentation:
      The H20 Amigo came with one page of instructions describing pre-use
      filter flushing, backcountry system use, care and maintenance, and
      use as a shower. These instructions are also located on the ULA
      website under the H20 Amigo and WaterWise Inline Filter pages.
      Information on system weight, volume capacity, filtration rate,
      filter type, and pore size are available on the website but were not
      included in the hard-copy documentation.

      First Impressions:
      The H20 Amigo looks like a lot of fun. When I first got it, I
      immediately ignored the instructions and set it up. It was very
      intuitive. The system came with filter cartridge and hoses all
      attached, so I made sure the on/off valve was in the off position and
      stuck it in the sink. After I had about a liter (34 oz) of water in
      the bag, I grabbed the drawstring's handles and strung it up. The
      bag was pretty floppy with water in it, but the handles showed me
      where to grab the drawstring and pull. I was glad for that, because
      if I'd pulled on the wrong sections of the drawstring, the bag would
      collapse and water would be everywhere. I placed the drawstring over
      a hook about 6 1/2' (2.0 m) off the ground. In this position, the
      bottom of the spigit just reached my 1 L (34 oz) Nalgene bottle
      sitting on the floor. I turned on the valve and let it flow. I was
      impressed by how fast water flowed through the system. After a
      little while my bottle was full, and I turned the filter off. I
      didn't notice any leaks in the water bag or tubing. All in all, it
      was a good first go.

      Features:
      Water bag. The water bag is a 2' (61 cm) diameter circle of 1.9 oz
      green ripstop nylon. The edge of the circle is finished with seam
      binding and contains 16 stainless steel grommets. The grommets
      reinforce the drawstring holes around the edge of the water bag.

      I attempted to fill the water bag to its max. I put 3 quarts (2.8 L)
      of water in the bag at the sink, then added more water while the bag
      was hanging. This proved challenging. Although the drawstring pulls
      the water bag opening closed, there is enough space left to add
      water. The challenge comes from the folds in the water bag produced
      by tightening the drawstring. When the drawstring is tight, the
      edges of the bag form accordian folds which poke 2" (cm) into the
      main opening of the bag. When I misjudged one of these folds, I
      ended up pouring water on my floor instead of in the bag. These
      folds also angle down some, so the useable volume of the waterbag is
      less than its maximum value. I loaded 1.25 gal (4.7 L) of water into
      the bag and was happy with that. A little more water could probably
      be added, but I was uncomfortable doing so because the folds were
      getting dangerously close to the waterline, and my floor was getting
      wet. For me, 1.25 gal (4.7 L) is the useable volume of the
      waterbag.

      Reinforced handles. The drawstring is one continuous loop of cord
      slightly larger than the diameter of the water bag when layed flat.
      The drawstring has two handles, each 4" (10 cm) long, made out of of
      1/4" (6 mm) diameter silicon tubing. One of the handles is free to
      slide on the drawstring while the other is fixed and hides the
      drawcord's two ends. The handles made it easy to determine where to
      pull on the drawstring to cynch it up, and they also made it easy to
      carry the bag without having the drawstring dig into my hands. When
      the drawstring is cynched, the water bag hangs about 1 1/2' (46 cm)
      from the handles. Because of this large distance from the handles to
      the bag, it was sometimes easier to grab lower down on the drawstring
      or on the top of the bag itself when I was carrying the full water
      bag.

      Pre-filter. The pre-filter is a 1 1/2" (4 cm) plastic screen
      attached to the water bag outlet. The pre-filter is removable and
      can be snapped off easily. The instructions indicate that with
      turbid water the water bag should be used as a silt settling
      chamber. The pre-filter pokes up into the bottom of the water bag,
      so large particles may be able to settle in the lower folds of the
      bag and not clog the cartridge filter. I will look at this in
      further testing.

      Valve and tubing. The on-off valve is easy to use. The valve turns
      smoothly and the handle is large enough to grab with two fingers.
      There is no labeling to indicate which positon is on and which is
      off, but the valve follows the convention of perpendicular handle for
      off and parallel handle for on.

      The system comes with three pieces of 3/4" (2 cm) diameter sillicon
      tubing. Two pieces are 2 1/2" (6 cm) long, while one is 35" (89
      cm). The short pieces went from the water bag to the on/off valve,
      and from the filter cartridge to the final container. The longer
      piece originally went from the the valve to the filter cartridge.
      All of the pieces are easy to remove and move around. I will see in
      further testing if the tubing provided is long enough for my needs.

      Backflushing. Once I read the instructions, I found I needed to
      backflush the carbon filter cartridge. The H20 Amigo comes with a
      flush bulb, which allowed me to hook the filter cartridge to a sink
      tap. The instructions for backflushing were easy to follow. The
      filter cartridge has a large red arrow on its side to
      indicate the direction the water should flow when the fiter is being
      used. There are also small words stamped into either side of the
      filter indicating "in" and "out". To backflush, the "out" is
      attached to a sink, and the filter was flushed after a minute. The
      instructions recommend backflushing the cartridge after prolonged use.

      Test Plan:
      During the coming months, I will test the H20 Amigo for ease of use.
      I will see if the water bag is easy to fill in a stream, if I have
      trouble carrying and hanging the bag, and if the filter produces
      clear and good-tasting water. I will see how much water clings to
      the system after use, and if the provided stuff sack keeps this water
      away from my other gear. I will also test the H20 Amigo in its
      capacity as a shower. I will be testing the H20 Amigo in the parks
      and on the trails of Montana and Wyoming.
    • JimSabis@aol.com
      Hi Jim, It s getting late, so I hope I don t have too many stupid mistakes in here for you.  #### Christine - Nice report. I only found one edit (minor
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Jim,

        It's getting late, so I hope I don't have too many stupid mistakes in
        here for you. 

        ####

        Christine - Nice report. I only found one edit (minor spelling) and a made
        some minor comments on some detail items which I think will add to the reports
        clarity. I can't wait to see what you can do when it isn't late! ; )

        Upload when ready!

        Jim S.


        ______________________
        H20 Amigo Gravity Filter



        First Impressions:
        In this position, the
        bottom of the spigit just reached my 1 L (34 oz) Nalgene bottle
        sitting on the floor. 

        ((EDIT: Spelling: 'spigit' should be 'spigot'))


        Features:
        Water bag.  The water bag is a 2' (61 cm) diameter circle of 1.9 oz
        green ripstop nylon.  The edge of the circle is finished with seam
        binding and contains 16 stainless steel grommets.  The grommets
        reinforce the drawstring holes around the edge of the water bag. 

        ((Suggestion: I think using the term 'pouch', or similar, instead of
        'circle', would more accurately convey what you are tryng to say here. The term
        'circle' makes me think of a flat circle, rather than a 3-D object. Like I said,
        just a suggestion.))



        Pre-filter.  The pre-filter is a 1 1/2" (4 cm) plastic screen
        attached to the water bag outlet.  The pre-filter is removable and
        can be snapped off easily. 

        (( Question: 'Snapped off' sounds like the pre-filter can be broken off. Is
        this your intent, or is it a snap-on/off fitting?))


        Valve and tubing.  The on-off valve is easy to use.  The valve turns
        smoothly and the handle is large enough to grab with two fingers. 
        There is no labeling to indicate which positon is on and which is
        off, but the valve follows the convention of perpendicular handle for
        off and parallel handle for on.

        ((Suggestion: I work with large scale plumbing installations, so I know what
        you are saying here, others may not. Perhaps adding something like "parallel
        to the water tube" or 'valve body' -if appropriate- would be a bit clearer.))

        ((That's it! Nice job.))
        .



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mark Bayern
        Christine, The ULA website shows this filter has a 2-micron filter pore size , your report says it is a 0.2 -- must be that getting late problem .
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 1, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Christine,

          The ULA website shows this filter has a ' 2-micron filter pore size',
          your report says it is a 0.2 -- must be that 'getting late problem'. <smile>

          Mark -- who used to live in Bozeman


          >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.