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Re: [BackpackGearTest] REPOST OR:MSR Dragonfly Stove:JOHN

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  • John E Musser
    MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review Tester Bio Name: John E Musser Age: 47 Gender: Male Height: 6 0 (1.83 m) Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg) Email address:
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 1, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review

      Tester Bio

      Name: John E Musser
      Age: 47
      Gender: Male
      Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
      Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
      Email address:
      <<mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>jemusserATsbcglobalDOTnet
      City, State, Country: Pharr, Texas, USA
      Date: May 26, 2004

      Backpacking Background: I started out "heavy-duty" backpacking what I was
      in junior and senior high schools. Most of the trips were all around Europe
      with my scout troup. Once I was through with school I took my blushing bride
      on a primitive trip. Forecast temps: lo/60f - hi/80 f (lo/15.5 c - hi/26.7
      c). Actual temps: lo/20 f - high/30 f (lo/-6.7 c hi/-1.1 c) and blowing
      snow. We packed it in and I haven't convinced her to schedule another trip
      into the snow country.

      In the intervening years, I have confined most of my exploits to areas
      within 600 miles (966 km) to 800 miles (1288 km) of home. This means I get
      few opportunities outside of the State of Texas or Northern Mexico.

      Now we're free of children (mostly) and make quite a few trips ranging from
      day tripping to trips reaching a week or so. I generally hike in areas
      where water is ALWAYS an issue. Most of the areas I frequent are desert and
      rainfall is infrequent except for the seasonal monsoons. Water is almost
      always placed in pre-planned "drops" for re-supply as the trip progresses.
      Additionally, cycle touring has turned me into a moderate "gram weenie" in
      order to be able to handle more water and increase endurance. The terrain I
      encounter mostly is moderate Texas hill country and Big Bend NP, TX, to
      northern Mexico.

      Backpacking Background applicable to this test: I regularly go on cycling
      trips ranging from 1 to 7 days as well as backpacking trips from 1 to 5 days.

      Review of Mountain Safety Research Dragonfly Stove
      <http://www.msrcorp.com/stoves/dragonfly.asp>http://www.msrcorp.com/stoves/dragonfly.asp.
      MSR is well known in for outdoor equipment from the simple backpacker up to
      high-end expedition products.

      I have had my Dragonfly since February 2001. At the time of purchase, I was
      more than a little concerned about the weight of the entire assembly since
      at the time I was going through major pains to reduce the carry weight of
      my pack. I had really one major demand. The stove had to reliably simmer.
      On several of the stoves I looked at this was much easier said than done. I
      settled on the Dragonfly after a thorough search into
      multi-fuel stoves.

      The Dragonfly comes packed in its own stuff sack that holds the stove,
      pump, aluminum wind deflector and spare parts kit. I also purchased an
      aluminum leg stiffener/reflector as an additional accessory. The weights
      for the Dragonfly as listed on the MSR website are: Minimum Weight: 14 oz.
      (395 g)
      Packaged Weight: 18 oz. (510 g). The weights of the various components as
      measured by me on a postal scale are:

      Stove complete w/o pump 11 oz / 300 g

      Pump 2 oz / 50 g

      Stuff sack/spare parts kit 4.5 oz / 130 g

      Leg stiffener/reflector 2 oz / 50 g (Optional)

      Full 11 oz. MSR Fuel cylinder 11oz/325ml contents - 2.8oz/79g cylinder

      Out of the stuff sack the Dragonfly presents itself in folded mode that
      reduces the storage space by about two-thirds. The stove itself is of an
      aluminum base and stainless steel wires for the stove/pot support. Included
      with the stove are a heavy aluminum windscreen, plastic pump assembly, one
      11.5 oz (340 ml) and a rebuild/spare parts kit. The spare parts kit
      includes everything on the Dragonfly, including lubricants. I have not
      needed any spare parts in 3 years of use except for the pump that I will
      explain more about later.

      By the very design of the MSR Dragonfly it makes for a superior platform
      for stability of cooksets. The pot/stove supports fold away from the body
      to give six points of support on the ground as well as for pots. The
      diameter of the supported area is approximately 3 in (7.6 cm) to 12 in
      (30.5 cm). It also has an integral simmering valve in the fuel line. MSR
      states that the Dragonfly will operate on white gas, kerosene or unleaded
      gasoline. In a stored condition the stove occupies an approximate 6-inch
      cube. Fuel cylinders occupy additional space.

      I go though several small steps before use. First I unfold the legs of the
      Dragonfly from the stored condition. The stored condition is according to
      MSR 1/3 the size of the operating stove, next is to fill the separate MSR
      fuel cylinder 11.5 oz (340 ml) with 8 oz (0.2 l). The amount of fuel used
      to fill the bottle is arbitrary but one, but one that I have become
      accustomed, making fuel management easier to keep track of. I fill the
      bottle once each morning of a backpacking trip and have more than adequate
      fuel for my daily cooking activities. Finally I screw in the pump and
      attach it the stove's fuel line though a slip-on connector.

      Lighting the Dragonfly couldn't be easier. First I make sure the main and
      simmer valves are shut off completely. I just pump the stove 30 strokes,
      open the main valve a couple turns and crack the simmering valve just
      enough to allow a small puddle to form around the burner cup on the top of
      the stove, light it and allow it to burn off. When the fire is nearly
      extinguished, I crack the valve again and the stove will almost always
      light without flaring. From there I adjust the simmering valve for flame as
      needed. I'm careful not to let in too much fuel at startup. The flareup can
      be excessive (I had one that reached about 2 ft (0.61 m) and we were scared
      a plenty). But in 3 years it's only happened once. Time needed to go from
      full throttle time to boil 1 liter of water as follows. With an ambient
      temperature of 76 f (42.2 c) the water boils in 1 minute 48 seconds to a
      full rolling boil. When the outdoor the outdoor temperature drops to 42 f
      (5.6 c) degrees the boiling time increased to 2 minutes 30 seconds. MSR
      markets the Dragonfly as having superior simmering characteristics.
      Surprisingly, when the Dragonfly was turned down to simmer it only added a
      minute to the boiling time (and a VASTLY quieter camp). The highest
      efficiency I witnessed was with a full 11.5 oz (340 ml) cylinder and on the
      slowest simmer the stove ran for 6.5 hrs.

      I found a small flaw in leveling the wired legs the Dragonfly is equipped
      with. If camped on the rocks like is common at Enchanted Rock, S.P., TX
      and Big Bend, N.P., TX it is a little difficult to steady the legs on the
      rocks. There just isn't any soil or gravel to work with. My answer was to
      buy the "MSR Trillium accessory base". This allows for a rigid base for all
      three legs. It is a heavy aluminum assembly of 3 pieces that spread out in
      a fan shape to a circular pattern. The base is punched with lightening
      holes as well as "keys" to fit the legs of the Dragonfly stove. I think
      they should make it part of the Dragonfly package but alas that would
      increase the price. In its favor though, the stove base does fit most of
      the other MSR stoves out there.

      The stove has mostly been run on stove fuel (white gas). I had to use some
      old unleaded gasoline once and the stove tended to soot a little. The
      Dragonfly comes equipped with a MSR innovation called a "shaker jet". It is
      basically a floating needle in the fuel feed just prior to the burner jet.
      Cleaning a "shaker jet" is as simple as a little shake and feeding it some
      good fuel! On a home trial only I have tried to run the stove on alcohol
      with mixed results. The heat output is noticeably lower, and that is at sea
      level. Sure burns clean though.

      I have cooked a myriad of meals from dehydrated fare, to raw foods, to pita
      pizzas. Fuel consumption is significantly less than my previous
      stove. The Dragonfly has been a joy to cook with. It has only one major
      flaw. The original plastic pump broke apart (the ears that hold the plunger
      in) in the middle of a 5-day trip. We managed to keep it going by pumping
      very carefully, but it was more than a little disconcerting. MSR's Customer
      Service came through and sent a new/upgraded model at no charge except for
      return freight. The replacement pump arrived within 5 days. Not too bad
      support for a 3-year-old product.

      This stove has seen much use. If I were looking for a lightweight, stable
      platform multi-fuel stove, with simmering capability all over again, I
      think I'd still buy the Dragonfly. The only reservation I have concerning
      the stove is the plastic fuel pump MSR features on all its stoves.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John E Musser
      MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review Tester Bio Name: John E Musser Age: 47 Gender: Male Height: 6 0 (1.83 m) Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg) Email address:
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 2, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review

        Tester Bio

        Name: John E Musser
        Age: 47
        Gender: Male
        Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
        Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
        Email address:
        <<mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>
        City, State, Country: Pharr, Texas, USA
        Date: May 26, 2004

        Backpacking Background: I started out "heavy-duty" backpacking what I was
        in junior and senior high schools. Most of the trips were all around Europe
        with my scout troup. Once I was through with school I took my blushing bride
        on a primitive trip. Forecast temps: lo/60 F - hi/80 F (lo/15.5 C - hi/26.7
        C). Actual temps: lo/20 F - high/30 F (lo/-6.7 C hi/-1.1 C) and blowing
        snow. We packed it in and I haven't convinced her to schedule another trip
        into the snow country.

        In the intervening years, I have confined most of my exploits to areas
        within 600 miles (966 km) to 800 miles (1288 km) of home. This means I get
        few opportunities outside of the State of Texas or Northern Mexico.

        Now we're free of children (mostly) and make quite a few trips ranging from
        day tripping to trips reaching a week or so. I generally hike in areas
        where water is ALWAYS an issue. Most of the areas I frequent are desert and
        rainfall is infrequent except for the seasonal monsoons. Water is almost
        always placed in pre-planned "drops" for re-supply as the trip progresses.
        Additionally, cycle touring has turned me into a moderate "gram weenie" in
        order to be able to handle more water and increase endurance. The terrain I
        encounter mostly is moderate Texas hill country and Big Bend NP, TX, to
        northern Mexico.

        Backpacking Background applicable to this test: I regularly go on cycling
        trips ranging from 1 to 7 days as well as backpacking trips from 1 to 5 days.

        Review of Mountain Safety Research Dragonfly Stove
        <http://www.msrcorp.com/>http://www.msrcorp.com/. MSR is well known in for
        outdoor equipment from the simple backpacker up to high-end expedition
        products.

        I have had my Dragonfly since February 2001. At the time of purchase, I was
        more than a little concerned about the weight of the entire assembly since
        I was going through major pains to reduce the carry weight of my pack. I
        had really one major demand. The stove had to reliably simmer. On several
        of the stoves I looked at this was much easier said than done. I settled on
        the Dragonfly after a thorough search into
        multi-fuel stoves.

        The Dragonfly comes packed in its own stuff sack that holds the stove,
        pump, aluminum wind deflector and spare parts kit. I also purchased an
        aluminum leg stiffener/reflector as an additional accessory. The weights
        for the Dragonfly as listed on the MSR website are: Minimum Weight: 14 oz.
        (395 g). Packaged Weight: 18 oz. (510 g). The weights of the various
        components as measured by me on a postal scale are:

        Stove complete w/o pump 11 oz / 300 g

        Pump 2 oz / 50 g

        Stuff sack/spare parts kit 4.5 oz / 130 g

        Leg stiffener/reflector 2 oz / 50 g (Optional)

        Full 11 oz. MSR Fuel cylinder 11oz/325ml contents - 2.8oz/79g cylinder

        Out of the stuff sack the Dragonfly presents itself in folded mode that
        reduces the storage space by about two-thirds. The stove itself is of an
        aluminum base and stainless steel wires for the stove/pot support. Included
        with the stove are a heavy aluminum windscreen, plastic pump assembly, one
        11.5 oz (340 ml) and a rebuild/spare parts kit. The spare parts kit
        includes everything on the Dragonfly, including lubricants. I have not
        needed any spare parts in 3 years of use except for the pump that I will
        explain more about later.

        By the very design of the MSR Dragonfly it makes for a superior platform
        for stability of cooksets. The pot/stove supports fold away from the body
        to give six points of support on the ground as well as for pots. The
        diameter of the supported area is approximately 3 in (7.6 cm) to 12 in
        (30.5 cm). It also has an integral simmering valve in the fuel line. MSR
        states that the Dragonfly will operate on white gas, kerosene or unleaded
        gasoline. In a stored condition the stove occupies an approximate 6-inch
        cube. Fuel cylinders occupy additional space.

        I go though several small steps before use. First I unfold the legs of the
        Dragonfly from the stored condition. The stored condition is according to
        MSR 1/3 the size of the operating stove, next is to fill the separate MSR
        fuel cylinder 11.5 oz (340 ml) with 8 oz (0.2 l). The amount of fuel used
        to fill the bottle is arbitrary but one, that I have become accustomed,
        making fuel management easier to keep track of. I fill the bottle once each
        morning of a backpacking trip and have more than adequate fuel for my daily
        cooking activities. Finally I screw in the pump and attach it the stove's
        fuel line though a slip-on connector.

        Lighting the Dragonfly couldn't be easier. First I make sure the main and
        simmer valves are shut off completely. I just pump the stove 30 strokes,
        open the main valve a couple turns and crack the simmering valve just
        enough to allow a small puddle to form around the burner cup on the top of
        the stove, light it and allow it to burn off. When the fire is nearly
        extinguished, I crack the valve again and the stove will almost always
        light without flaring. From there I adjust the simmering valve for flame as
        needed. I'm careful not to let in too much fuel at startup. The flareup can
        be excessive (I had one that reached about 2 ft (0.61 m) and we were scared
        a plenty). But in 3 years it's only happened once. Time needed to go from
        full throttle time to boil 1 liter of water as follows. With an ambient
        temperature of 76 F (42.2 C) the water boils in 1 minute 48 seconds to a
        full rolling boil. When the outdoor the outdoor temperature drops to 42 F
        (5.6 C) degrees the boiling time increases to 2 minutes 30 seconds. MSR
        markets the Dragonfly as having superior simmering characteristics.
        Surprisingly, when the Dragonfly was turned down to simmer it only added a
        minute to the boiling time (and a VASTLY quieter camp). The highest
        efficiency I witnessed was with a full 11.5 oz (340 ml) cylinder and on the
        slowest simmer the stove ran for 6.5 hrs.

        I found a small flaw in leveling the wired legs the Dragonfly is equipped
        with. If camped on the rocks like is common at Enchanted Rock, S.P., TX
        and Big Bend, N.P., TX it is a little difficult to steady the legs on the
        rocks. There just isn't any soil or gravel to work with. My answer was to
        buy the "MSR Trillium accessory base". This allows for a rigid base for all
        three legs. It is a heavy aluminum assembly of 3 pieces that spread out in
        a fan shape to a circular pattern. The base is punched with lightening
        holes as well as "keys" to fit the legs of the Dragonfly stove. I think
        they should make it part of the Dragonfly package but alas that would
        increase the price. In its favor though, the stove base does fit most of
        the other MSR stoves out there.

        The stove has mostly been run on stove fuel (white gas). I had to use some
        old unleaded gasoline once and the stove tended to soot a little. The
        Dragonfly comes equipped with a MSR innovation called a "shaker jet". It is
        basically a floating needle in the fuel feed just prior to the burner jet.
        Cleaning a "shaker jet" is as simple as a little shake and feeding it some
        good fuel! On a home trial only I have tried to run the stove on alcohol
        with mixed results. The heat output is noticeably lower, and that is at sea
        level. Sure burns clean though.

        I have cooked a myriad of meals from dehydrated fare, to raw foods, to pita
        pizzas. Fuel consumption is significantly less than my previous
        stove. The Dragonfly has been a joy to cook with. It has only one major
        flaw. The original plastic pump broke apart (the ears that hold the plunger
        in) in the middle of a 5-day trip. We managed to keep it going by pumping
        very carefully, but it was more than a little disconcerting. MSR's Customer
        Service came through and sent a new/upgraded model at no charge except for
        return freight. The replacement pump arrived within 5 days. Not too bad
        support for a 3-year-old product.

        This stove has seen much use. If I were looking for a lightweight, stable
        platform multi-fuel stove, with simmering capability all over again, I
        think I'd still buy the Dragonfly. The only reservation I have concerning
        the stove is the plastic fuel pump MSR features on all its stoves.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John E Musser
        MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review Tester Bio Name: John E Musser Age: 47 Gender: Male Height: 6 0 (1.83 m) Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg) Email address:
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 5, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review

          Tester Bio

          Name: John E Musser
          Age: 47
          Gender: Male
          Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
          Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
          Email address:
          <<mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>
          City, State, Country: Pharr, Texas, USA
          Date: May 26, 2004

          Backpacking Background: I started out "heavy-duty" backpacking what I was
          in junior and senior high schools. Most of the trips were all around Europe
          with my scout troup. Once I was through with school I took my blushing bride
          on a primitive trip. Forecast temps: lo/60 F - hi/80 F (lo/15.5 C - hi/26.7
          C). Actual temps: lo/20 F - high/30 F (lo/-6.7 C hi/-1.1 C) and blowing
          snow. We packed it in and I haven't convinced her to schedule another trip
          into the snow country.

          In the intervening years, I have confined most of my exploits to areas
          within 600 miles (966 km) to 800 miles (1288 km) of home. This means I get
          few opportunities outside of the State of Texas or Northern Mexico.

          Now we're free of children (mostly) and make quite a few trips ranging from
          day tripping to trips reaching a week or so. I generally hike in areas
          where water is ALWAYS an issue. Most of the areas I frequent are desert and
          rainfall is infrequent except for the seasonal monsoons. Water is almost
          always placed in pre-planned "drops" for re-supply as the trip progresses.
          Additionally, cycle touring has turned me into a moderate "gram weenie" in
          order to be able to handle more water and increase endurance. The terrain I
          encounter mostly is moderate Texas hill country and Big Bend NP, TX, to
          northern Mexico.

          Backpacking Background applicable to this test: I regularly go on cycling
          trips ranging from 1 to 7 days as well as backpacking trips from 1 to 5 days.

          Review of Mountain Safety Research Dragonfly Stove
          <http://www.msrcorp.com/>http://www.msrcorp.com/. MSR is well known in for
          outdoor equipment from the simple backpacker up to high-end expedition
          products.

          I have had my Dragonfly since February 2001. At the time of purchase, I was
          more than a little concerned about the weight of the entire assembly since
          I was going through major pains to reduce the carry weight of my pack. I
          had really one major demand. The stove had to reliably simmer. On several
          of the stoves I looked at this was much easier said than done. I settled on
          the Dragonfly after a thorough search into
          multi-fuel stoves.

          The Dragonfly comes packed in its own stuff sack that holds the stove,
          pump, aluminum wind deflector and spare parts kit. I also purchased an
          aluminum leg stiffener/reflector as an additional accessory. The weights
          for the Dragonfly as listed on the MSR website are: Minimum Weight: 14 oz.
          (395 g). Packaged Weight: 18 oz. (510 g). The weights of the various
          components as measured by me on a postal scale are:

          Stove complete w/o pump 11 oz / 300 g

          Pump 2 oz / 50 g

          Stuff sack/spare parts kit 4.5 oz / 130 g

          Leg stiffener/reflector 2 oz / 50 g (Optional)

          Full 11 oz. MSR Fuel cylinder 11oz/325ml contents - 2.8oz/79g cylinder

          Out of the stuff sack the Dragonfly presents itself in folded mode that
          reduces the storage space by about two-thirds. The stove itself is of an
          aluminum base and stainless steel wires for the stove/pot support. Included
          with the stove are a heavy aluminum windscreen, plastic pump assembly, one
          11.5 oz (340 ml) and a rebuild/spare parts kit. The spare parts kit
          includes everything on the Dragonfly, including lubricants. I have not
          needed any spare parts in 3 years of use except for the pump that I will
          explain more about later.

          By the very design of the MSR Dragonfly it makes for a superior platform
          for stability of cooksets. The pot/stove supports fold away from the body
          to give six points of support on the ground as well as for pots. The
          diameter of the supported area is approximately 3 in (7.6 cm) to 12 in
          (30.5 cm). It also has an integral simmering valve in the fuel line. MSR
          states that the Dragonfly will operate on white gas, kerosene or unleaded
          gasoline. In a stored condition the stove occupies an approximate 6-inch
          cube. Fuel cylinders occupy additional space.

          I go though several small steps before use. First I unfold the legs of the
          Dragonfly from the stored condition. The stored condition is according to
          MSR 1/3 the size of the operating stove, next is to fill the separate MSR
          fuel cylinder 11.5 oz (340 ml) with 8 oz (0.2 l). The amount of fuel used
          to fill the bottle is arbitrary but one, that I have become accustomed,
          making fuel management easier to keep track of. I fill the bottle once each
          morning of a backpacking trip and have more than adequate fuel for my daily
          cooking activities. Finally I screw in the pump and attach it the stove's
          fuel line though a slip-on connector.

          Lighting the Dragonfly couldn't be easier. First I make sure the main and
          simmer valves are shut off completely. I just pump the stove 30 strokes,
          open the main valve a couple turns and crack the simmering valve just
          enough to allow a small puddle to form around the burner cup on the top of
          the stove, light it and allow it to burn off. When the fire is nearly
          extinguished, I crack the valve again and the stove will almost always
          light without flaring. From there I adjust the simmering valve for flame as
          needed. I'm careful not to let in too much fuel at startup. The flareup can
          be excessive (I had one that reached about 2 ft (0.61 m) and we were scared
          a plenty). But in 3 years it's only happened once. Time needed to go from
          full throttle time to boil 1 liter of water as follows. With an ambient
          temperature of 76 F (42.2 C) the water boils in 1 minute 48 seconds to a
          full rolling boil. When the outdoor the outdoor temperature drops to 42 F
          (5.6 C) degrees the boiling time increases to 2 minutes 30 seconds. MSR
          markets the Dragonfly as having superior simmering characteristics.
          Surprisingly, when the Dragonfly was turned down to simmer it only added a
          minute to the boiling time (and a VASTLY quieter camp). The highest
          efficiency I witnessed was with a full 11.5 oz (340 ml) cylinder and on the
          slowest simmer the stove ran for 6.5 hrs.

          I found a small flaw in leveling the wired legs the Dragonfly is equipped
          with. If camped on the rocks like is common at Enchanted Rock, S.P., TX
          and Big Bend, N.P., TX it is a little difficult to steady the legs on the
          rocks. There just isn't any soil or gravel to work with. My answer was to
          buy the "MSR Trillium accessory base". This allows for a rigid base for all
          three legs. It is a heavy aluminum assembly of 3 pieces that spread out in
          a fan shape to a circular pattern. The base is punched with lightening
          holes as well as "keys" to fit the legs of the Dragonfly stove. I think
          they should make it part of the Dragonfly package but alas that would
          increase the price. In its favor though, the stove base does fit most of
          the other MSR stoves out there.

          The stove has mostly been run on stove fuel (white gas). I had to use some
          old unleaded gasoline once and the stove tended to soot a little. The
          Dragonfly comes equipped with a MSR innovation called a "shaker jet". It is
          basically a floating needle in the fuel feed just prior to the burner jet.
          Cleaning a "shaker jet" is as simple as a little shake and feeding it some
          good fuel! On a home trial only I have tried to run the stove on alcohol
          with mixed results. The heat output is noticeably lower, and that is at sea
          level. Sure burns clean though.

          I have cooked a myriad of meals from dehydrated fare, to raw foods, to pita
          pizzas. Fuel consumption is significantly less than my previous
          stove. The Dragonfly has been a joy to cook with. It has only one major
          flaw. The original plastic pump broke apart (the ears that hold the plunger
          in) in the middle of a 5-day trip. We managed to keep it going by pumping
          very carefully, but it was more than a little disconcerting. MSR's Customer
          Service came through and sent a new/upgraded model at no charge except for
          return freight. The replacement pump arrived within 5 days. Not too bad
          support for a 3-year-old product.

          This stove has seen much use. If I were looking for a lightweight, stable
          platform multi-fuel stove, with simmering capability all over again, I
          think I'd still buy the Dragonfly. The only reservation I have concerning
          the stove is the plastic fuel pump MSR features on all its stoves.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John E Musser
          OOPS MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review Tester Bio Name: John E Musser Age: 47 Gender: Male Height: 6 0 (1.83 m) Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg) Email address:
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 5, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            OOPS



            MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review

            Tester Bio

            Name: John E Musser
            Age: 47
            Gender: Male
            Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
            Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
            Email address:
            <<mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet>
            City, State, Country: Pharr, Texas, USA
            Date: May 26, 2004

            Backpacking Background: I started out "heavy-duty" backpacking what I was
            in junior and senior high schools. Most of the trips were all around Europe
            with my scout troup. Once I was through with school I took my blushing bride
            on a primitive trip. Forecast temps: lo/60 F - hi/80 F (lo/15.5 C - hi/26.7
            C). Actual temps: lo/20 F - high/30 F (lo/-6.7 C hi/-1.1 C) and blowing
            snow. We packed it in and I haven't convinced her to schedule another trip
            into the snow country.

            In the intervening years, I have confined most of my exploits to areas
            within 600 miles (966 km) to 800 miles (1288 km) of home. This means I get
            few opportunities outside of the State of Texas or Northern Mexico.

            Now we're free of children (mostly) and make quite a few trips ranging from
            day tripping to trips reaching a week or so. I generally hike in areas
            where water is ALWAYS an issue. Most of the areas I frequent are desert and
            rainfall is infrequent except for the seasonal monsoons. Water is almost
            always placed in pre-planned "drops" for re-supply as the trip progresses.
            Additionally, cycle touring has turned me into a moderate "gram weenie" in
            order to be able to handle more water and increase endurance. The terrain I
            encounter mostly is moderate Texas hill country and Big Bend NP, TX, to
            northern Mexico.

            Backpacking Background applicable to this test: I regularly go on cycling
            trips ranging from 1 to 7 days as well as backpacking trips from 1 to 5 days.

            Review of Mountain Safety Research Dragonfly Stove
            <http://www.msrcorp.com/>http://www.msrcorp.com/. MSR is well known in for
            outdoor equipment from the simple backpacker up to high-end expedition
            products.

            I have had my Dragonfly since February 2001. At the time of purchase, I was
            more than a little concerned about the weight of the entire assembly since
            I was going through major pains to reduce the carry weight of my pack. I
            had really one major demand. The stove had to reliably simmer. On several
            of the stoves I looked at this was much easier said than done. I settled on
            the Dragonfly after a thorough search into
            multi-fuel stoves.

            The Dragonfly comes packed in its own stuff sack that holds the stove,
            pump, aluminum wind deflector and spare parts kit. I also purchased an
            aluminum leg stiffener/reflector as an additional accessory. The weights
            for the Dragonfly as listed on the MSR website are: Minimum Weight: 14 oz.
            (395 g). Packaged Weight: 18 oz. (510 g). The weights of the various
            components as measured by me on a postal scale are:

            Stove complete w/o pump 11 oz / 300 g

            Pump 2 oz / 50 g

            Stuff sack/spare parts kit 4.5 oz / 130 g

            Leg stiffener/reflector 2 oz / 50 g (Optional)

            Full 11 oz. MSR Fuel cylinder 11oz/325ml contents - 2.8oz/79g cylinder

            Out of the stuff sack the Dragonfly presents itself in folded mode that
            reduces the storage space by about two-thirds. The stove itself is of an
            aluminum base and stainless steel wires for the stove/pot support. Included
            with the stove are a heavy aluminum windscreen, plastic pump assembly, one
            11.5 oz (340 ml) and a rebuild/spare parts kit. The spare parts kit
            includes everything on the Dragonfly, including lubricants. I have not
            needed any spare parts in 3 years of use except for the pump that I will
            explain more about later.

            By the very design of the MSR Dragonfly it makes for a superior platform
            for stability of cooksets. The pot/stove supports fold away from the body
            to give six points of support on the ground as well as for pots. The
            diameter of the supported area is approximately 3 in (7.6 cm) to 12 in
            (30.5 cm). It also has an integral simmering valve in the fuel line. MSR
            states that the Dragonfly will operate on white gas, kerosene or unleaded
            gasoline. In a stored condition the stove occupies an approximate 6-inch
            cube. Fuel cylinders occupy additional space.

            I go though several small steps before use. First I unfold the legs of the
            Dragonfly from the stored condition. The stored condition is according to
            MSR 1/3 the size of the operating stove, next is to fill the separate MSR
            fuel cylinder 11.5 oz (340 ml) with 8 oz (0.2 l). The amount of fuel used
            to fill the bottle is arbitrary but one, that I have become accustomed,
            making fuel management easier to keep track of. I fill the bottle once each
            morning of a backpacking trip and have more than adequate fuel for my daily
            cooking activities. Finally I screw in the pump and attach it the stove's
            fuel line though a slip-on connector.

            Lighting the Dragonfly couldn't be easier. First I make sure the main and
            simmer valves are shut off completely. I just pump the stove 30 strokes,
            open the main valve a couple turns and crack the simmering valve just
            enough to allow a small puddle to form around the burner cup on the top of
            the stove, light it and allow it to burn off. When the fire is nearly
            extinguished, I crack the valve again and the stove will almost always
            light without flaring. From there I adjust the simmering valve for flame as
            needed. I'm careful not to let in too much fuel at startup. The flareup can
            be excessive (I had one that reached about 2 ft (0.61 m) and we were scared
            a plenty). But in 3 years it's only happened once. Time needed to go from
            full throttle time to boil 1 liter of water as follows. With an ambient
            temperature of 76 F (42.2 C) the water boils in 1 minute 48 seconds to a
            full rolling boil. When the outdoor the outdoor temperature drops to 42 F
            (5.6 C) degrees the boiling time increases to 2 minutes 30 seconds. MSR
            markets the Dragonfly as having superior simmering characteristics.
            Surprisingly, when the Dragonfly was turned down to simmer it only added a
            minute to the boiling time (and a VASTLY quieter camp). The highest
            efficiency I witnessed was with a full 11.5 oz (340 ml) cylinder and on the
            slowest simmer the stove ran for 6.5 hrs.

            I found a small flaw in leveling the wired legs the Dragonfly is equipped
            with. If camped on the rocks like is common at Enchanted Rock, S.P., TX
            and Big Bend, N.P., TX it is a little difficult to steady the legs on the
            rocks. There just isn't any soil or gravel to work with. My answer was to
            buy the "MSR Trillium accessory base". This allows for a rigid base for all
            three legs. It is a heavy aluminum assembly of 3 pieces that spread out in
            a fan shape to a circular pattern. The base is punched with lightening
            holes as well as "keys" to fit the legs of the Dragonfly stove. I think
            they should make it part of the Dragonfly package but alas that would
            increase the price. In its favor though, the stove base does fit most of
            the other MSR stoves out there.

            The stove has mostly been run on stove fuel (white gas). I had to use some
            old unleaded gasoline once and the stove tended to soot a little. The
            Dragonfly comes equipped with a MSR innovation called a "shaker jet". It is
            basically a floating needle in the fuel feed just prior to the burner jet.
            Cleaning a "shaker jet" is as simple as a little shake and feeding it some
            good fuel! On a home trial only I have tried to run the stove on alcohol
            with mixed results. The heat output is noticeably lower, and that is at sea
            level. Sure burns clean though.

            I have cooked a myriad of meals from dehydrated fare, to raw foods, to pita
            pizzas. Fuel consumption is significantly less than my previous
            stove. The Dragonfly has been a joy to cook with. It has only one major
            flaw. The original plastic pump broke apart (the ears that hold the plunger
            in) in the middle of a 5-day trip. We managed to keep it going by pumping
            very carefully, but it was more than a little disconcerting. MSR's Customer
            Service came through and sent a new/upgraded model at no charge except for
            return freight. The replacement pump arrived within 5 days. Not too bad
            support for a 3-year-old product.

            This stove has seen much use. If I were looking for a lightweight, stable
            platform multi-fuel stove, with simmering capability all over again, I
            think I'd still buy the Dragonfly. The only reservation I have concerning
            the stove is the plastic fuel pump MSR features on all its stoves.



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John E Musser
            I don t know why, but the doubled http: is not me, it is showing up on its own. John
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 5, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              I don't know why, but the doubled http: is not me, it is showing up on its own.

              John



              At 18:26 6/5/2004, you wrote:

              >OOPS
              >
              >
              >
              >MSR Dragonfly Stove: Owner Review
              >
              >Tester Bio
              >
              >Name: John E Musser
              >Age: 47
              >Gender: Male
              >Height: 6' 0" (1.83 m)
              >Weight: 205 lbs (93 kg)
              >Email address:
              >mailto:JEMusserATsbcglobalDOTnet
              >City, State, Country: Pharr, Texas, USA
              >Date: May 26, 2004
              >
              >Backpacking Background: I started out "heavy-duty" backpacking what I was
              >in junior and senior high schools. Most of the trips were all around Europe
              >with my scout troup. Once I was through with school I took my blushing bride
              >on a primitive trip. Forecast temps: lo/60 F - hi/80 F (lo/15.5 C - hi/26.7
              >http://www.msrcorp.com/. MSR is well known in for
              >outdoor equipment from the simple backpacker up to high-end expedition
              >
              > screw in the pump and attach it the stove's
              >fuel line though a slip-on connector.
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