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RE: Re: re jetboil boil times

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  • R Caffin
    ... at ... Burnt ... I should explain the importance of this. If you get a lot of condensation it can collect and fall down onto the burner. It can temporarily
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 1, 2004
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      > Oh, at the *top* of the pot.
      > > Put a lot of snow in a pot, pack it full, then put it on a stove running
      at
      > > low or medium.
      > > You might well find condensation forming around the top of the pot.
      Burnt
      > > fuel makes a lot of water vapour.

      I should explain the importance of this.
      If you get a lot of condensation it can collect and fall down onto the
      burner. It can temporarily extinguish part of the flame, putting fuel vapour
      onto the air. This can be dangerous.

      But the worst case here is when the condensate hits the generator tube and
      chills it. This can cause liquid fuel to come out of the burner, spraying
      everywhere. This is not good.

      Even worse is the possibility that it can thermal-shock the tube such that
      gunge built up inside the tube is broken loose. This gunge then flies down
      the tube to the jet and blocks it - solid. You no longer have a stove.

      The above are not theory! It was late in the evening in the middle of a
      ski-touring trip when I started cooking, and made this mistake. The jet
      ended up blocked, and I could not get it clean. We (my wife and I) had a
      cold dinner in the snow that night, and had to do an emergency retreat in
      bad weather. It took an industrial detergent and an ultrasonic bath to get
      the gunge out of the generator tube and the jet.

      Cheers
      Roger Caffin
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