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HSSC Stream Field Report

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  • Bill Baldwin
    Here is my very belated HSSC Stream FR. Please accept my apologies for this report being so late. I will repost my initial report ASAP. bill High Sierra
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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      Here is my very belated HSSC Stream FR. Please accept my apologies
      for this report being so late. I will repost my initial report ASAP.

      bill


      High Sierra Stream Hydration Pack
      Field Report
      December 31, 2003



      Product Details:
      Manufacturer: High Sierra Sport Company
      Manufacturer URL: http://www.highsierrasport.com
      Product: Stream (model 6869)
      Manufacture date: 2003
      MSRP: $70.00 USD
      Listed pack weight: none
      Actual pack weight:
      Listed outside pack dimensions: 16 in. x 12 in. x 5 in. (40.6 cm x
      30.5 cm x 12.7 cm)
      Actual outside pack dimensions: same
      Materials used: 600-denier Duralite®, Duralite® Ripstop

      Product Description:

      · Large main compartment holds a 2-liter water reservoir

      · Hands-free water reservoir pressure valve

      · Easy-access, water-resistant rain cover in bottom pocket

      · Insulated water tube cover

      · Hide-away front flap holds a helmet

      · Front organizer pocket and dual side mesh pockets

      · Angled adjustable compression straps

      · Deluxe Airflow™ suspended mesh back provides maximum ventilation

      · VAPEL™ mesh Airflow™ adjustable shoulder straps

      · Adjustable waist belt secures the pack

      · Adjustable sternum strap helps stabilize the pack

      · Reflective accent piping for safety

      Additional Product Dimensions:
      2-L Water bladder: 6.5 in. x 15 in. (16.5 cm x 38.1 cm)
      Water tube length: 41 in. (104 cm)
      Distance between mesh backing and back of pack: 2.75 in. (7 cm)
      Front pocket: 8 in. x 11 in. (20.3 cm x 27.9 cm)
      Front inside pocket: 10.5 in. deep (26.7 cm)
      Front zippered pocket: 5.5 in. deep (14 cm)
      Front unzippered pocket: 4.25 in. deep (11 cm)
      Pencil pockets: 2 in. x 3.25 in. (5 cm x 8.3 cm)
      Front velcro pocket: 4 in. x 8.5 in. (10.2 cm x 21.6 cm)
      Side mesh pockets: 5 in. x 9 in. (12.7 cm x 22.9 cm)

      Field Report:

      I have had mixed results using this pack. While I enjoy the
      separation from my back that the pack allows, I have had some
      difficulty with the bit valve and water bladder.



      The bit valve resembles a pair of lips when viewed and dispenses water
      when the piece if pulled out away from the hose. In the closed
      position, it is not supposed to leak water. In the center of the
      "lips" is a slit for water passage. The difficulty I originally had
      was adjusting to how the bit valve works. On my first trip with the
      pack, I filled up the bladder with water (more on this later) and
      started hiking. It didn't take long before I tried to get water from
      the system. Pulling open the valve and sucking didn't work. Taking
      the cover off the valve itself didn't work. Looking at the now
      detached valve cover did show a slit in the cover to allow liquid to
      pass through it. Putting it back on, pulling the valve open, and
      sucking until the veins in my neck protruded still produced no water.
      Finally I took the bladder from the pack and took the cover off the
      bit valve. By opening the valve and pressing down on the bladder,
      water came through the tube and valve. AH HA!!! SUCCESS!!! Sort of.
      Putting the cover back on the bit valve and sucking still was not
      working for me. I continued to work on the bit valve to determine how
      it was supposed to work, and it appears that you almost have to shift
      the top and bottom of the valve in opposite directions horizontally to
      make this valve work. It will not work by simply biting down to
      create a opening for the liquid to pass. I continued on my hike and
      have since gradually gotten accustomed to the bit valve. For hikes
      and walking trips, the pack fits everything I need and the bit valve
      stores in a thumb loop in the shoulder strap. For bike trips, using
      the bit valve can be a challenge. While the bit valve stores in it's
      handy thumb loop holder, it doesn't always stay there while mountain
      biking. This is how I found out the bit valve leaks. While mountain
      biking, trying to get the bit valve, pull it open, take a drink, push
      the valve shut, and put it back in the thumb loop so it won't leak
      with one hand is a challenge. I have resigned to stopping to do this
      operation for my safety and the safety of others.



      The bladder has remained puncture free and easy to maintain. However,
      the first bladder that was sent leaked at the point where the water
      hose connects to the bottom of the bladder. Continued fiddling with
      this connection to get everything tight did not stop the leak. High
      Sierra sent another bladder that has not leaked at this connection.
      The connection from the bladder to the water hose is a graduated step
      round connection. The bladder then inserts into a sleeve inside the
      pack. I mention this because I have had some problems keeping the
      water hose connected to a full bladder as it is inserted into the
      sleeve inside the pack. I have solved this in two ways. One method
      is to push the hose down securely on the connector through the sleeve
      in the pack. The other method was to fill the bladder while in the
      sleeve inside the pack.



      The bladder has a wide mouth opening and holds close to 2 liters of
      liquid. When the bladder is removed from the pack for filling, it is
      easy to hold the mouth of the opening for filling. However, I haven't
      found a good way to hold this bladder below the mouth and not spill
      water all over the place to get the lid screwed on. Once filled and
      inside the pack, the pack insulates the water well. I have frozen
      water in the bladder and had the water remain cold for 3 1/2 hours in
      90 F (32 C) heat. I have not had the same luck with the black
      insulation on the water tube. The black insulation heats the small
      amount of water in the tube when exposed to direct sunlight. This
      resulted in getting a drink of very warm water until the water in the
      tube was replaced by the cold water from the bladder. The full 2
      liter amount of the bladder is available to you and the bladder does
      not get harder to siphon as it empties.



      The pack was comfortable and did keep my back cooler than other
      hydration packs I have that snug to my back The "Deluxe Airflow™"
      mesh back does still create some sweating where it contacts my back,
      but not as much as the full contact bladders I have. The shoulder
      straps are adjustable, but I have not really determined how best to
      carry this pack The top of the pack that comes into contact with your
      back includes a cushioned piece for comfort. When this cushioned
      piece is up against the base of my neck, the sternum straps are riding
      too high and the thumb loop holder for the bit valve is at the top of
      my shoulder. Lowering the pack places this cushion between my
      shoulder blades. The most comfortable position I have found so far is
      to sling the pack over one shoulder. The waist belt does help keep
      the pack stable when using both shoulder straps and is conveniently
      tucked away inside the small wings of the waist belt when not in use.
      As noted on their website, the pack includes a hide-away mesh holder
      capable of holding a helmet. I can vouch for the fact that it will
      hold a bicycle helmet or a mountaineering helmet.



      The pack holds a decent amount of stuff, which should suffice for a
      daytrip. The curvature of the pack can hide small items. I got very
      anxious when I couldn't find my wallet in the pack. By digging all
      the way around the water bladder down the curvature of the pack found
      my wallet hiding at the very bottom. I have been able to pack the
      standard daytrip type stuff - Frogg Togg's rain suit, first aid kit,
      sandwich, etc. The pack is expandable so you can pack some things
      that won't get squished. The nylon material has shown no signs of
      fraying or wear. I once ran 1 mile in a driving rainstorm with this
      pack and the contents of the pack did not get wet. I did not know
      about the rain cover located in the bottom compartment until after I
      had returned home. On this same trip, the humidity was very high in
      the morning showing up as a heavy dew. Each day I checked the
      contents of items I had stored in the pack and they were not affected.


      Summary:
      This pack is loaded. It has plenty of pockets for storing small items
      and appears to be well made and sturdy. The inside of the pack is
      roomy enough with a full water bladder to hold items needed for a day
      hike. The pack was easy to adjust for fit and carries well with a full
      water bladder. Once accustomed to the bit valve, it has become easier
      to use, however it still leaks.



      I will continue testing this pack in our "winter" weather.
      Unfortunately, our winter weather has been in the mid 60's F (~ 18 C)
      and I have been unable to test this pack in freezing tempratures.

      Personal Bio:
      Name: Bill Baldwin
      Age: 43
      Gender: male
      Height: 6' 00" (183 cm)
      Weight: 180 (86 kg)
      Email address: bill dot baldwin at bigfoot dot com
      Residence: Dallas area, Texas, USA

      Backpacking Background:
      I am active in Boy Scouts as an adult leader and enjoy taking the
      older boys on high adventure trips backpacking, canoeing, rappelling,
      and mountain climbing. I am an active outdoorsman and
      camp/hike/backpack at least once a month. I grew up camping with my
      parents and have enjoyed backpacking and camping for the last 10+
      years with my children on our family trips as well as with scouts. I
      am a recent convert to lightweight backpacking and am slowly acquiring
      the lightweight toys so I can go on extended backpacking trips. I have
      several uses for a hydration pack in my Scouting, camping, and hunting
      outings and could put this pack through its paces to determine its
      strengths and weaknesses.

      Thanks to HSSC and BGT for the opportunity to test this pack.

      Respectfully submitted,
      Bill Baldwin
    • Andrew Priest
      ... Good to see you are back posting Bill. Andrew -- http://BackpackGearTest.org : The most comprehensive interactive gear reviews and tests on the planet
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2004
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        At 04:46 AM 03/01/2004, you wrote:
        >Here is my very belated HSSC Stream FR. Please accept my apologies
        >for this report being so late. I will repost my initial report ASAP.

        Good to see you are back posting Bill.

        Andrew

        --
        http://BackpackGearTest.org : The most comprehensive interactive gear
        reviews and tests on the planet


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bill Baldwin
        Thanks. I am truly sorry it took so long to get this report in. I wouldn t wish what I went throuh on my worst enemy. bill
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 5, 2004
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          Thanks. I am truly sorry it took so long to get this report in. I
          wouldn't wish what I went throuh on my worst enemy.

          bill

          --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Priest <apriest@b...>
          wrote:
          > At 04:46 AM 03/01/2004, you wrote:
          > >Here is my very belated HSSC Stream FR. Please accept my apologies
          > >for this report being so late. I will repost my initial report ASAP.
          >
          > Good to see you are back posting Bill.
          >
          > Andrew
          >
        • Mark Stiebel
          Bill, Thanks for posting your field report. Better late than never (like my edit!) Please find comments marked with ### Feel free to upload your report when
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 16, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Bill,

            Thanks for posting your field report. Better late than never (like my
            edit!)
            Please find comments marked with ###

            Feel free to upload your report when ready

            Listed pack weight: none
            Actual pack weight:


            ### If you're going to list the weights, you should probably give some
            numbers.


            Field Report:

            I have had some difficulty with the bit valve and water bladder.


            ### I always thought that they were called "Bite valves". Anyone else?


            The pack was comfortable and did keep my back cooler than other
            hydration packs I have that snug to my back The "Deluxe AirflowT"


            ### "which snug to my back"
            ### And you're missing a full stop before "The"

            carry this pack The top of the pack that comes into contact with your


            ### Missing full stop before "The"


            The pack holds a decent amount of stuff, which should suffice for a
            daytrip. The curvature of the pack can hide small items. I got very
            anxious when I couldn't find my wallet in the pack. By digging all
            the way around the water bladder down the curvature of the pack found
            my wallet hiding at the very bottom. I have been able to pack the


            ### Try this:
            Once I got very anxious when I couldn't find my wallet in the pack,
            but by digging all the way . found it hiding at the very bottom

            --
            -= Mark
            -= mark@...



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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