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Fabric weights

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  • R Caffin
    Hi all ... Maybe you should cut some squares out of each and weigh them? :-) And see below. ... Funny story. France has been metric for a LONG time, right? But
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 29, 2003
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      Hi all

      Coy Boy wrote:
      > PS perhaps we should convert what is given by the manufacture and
      > let the reader sort it out. perhaps this is a good time to allow
      > comparrison, ie the shell fabric of the Wisp feels lighter and
      > slicker than the fabric in my WM Apachee.
      Maybe you should cut some squares out of each and weigh them? :-)
      And see below.

      Alex asked:
      > True - but "metric" is not the same as "European" (even though "English
      > (Imperial)" is pretty much equivalent to "American" these days).
      Funny story. France has been metric for a LONG time, right? But (some few
      years ago) we were in a local french town market, and I heard an old woman
      ask the stall owner for "a pound of butter" (in French of course). She got
      500 g. Clearly, old habits die hard in the French countryside!

      > What do Aus and NZ mfrs quote ?
      In principle we are metric. In practice most vendors specify in metric, and
      have for some time, but they may sometimes also *quote* the original
      American figure as well. Some heavier fabrics are described in denier (eg
      1000 denier Cordura), and people still refer to heavy poly-cotton pack
      canvas as '12-oz' canvas. But that is more descriptive than specification.

      Basically, the trade still buys on sample rather than specification.
      (Military excepted.)

      > The problem with such comparisons is that (with very few exceptions) only
      a
      > minuscule portion of the readers will gain any information from this
      > comparison - they'll have no better chance of having felt a WM Apache than
      > then Wisp - so it is essential that we try to convey the info without the
      > comparison anyway; and therefore why bother including the comparison?
      I agree that this is a key point. I would add that those readers who do have
      some understanding of the meaning of the numbers will probably also know the
      conversion factors. The differences between finished and unfinished make a
      mess.

      Can I suggest that really techncial issues such as this should be left
      optional? The conversion tool could give straight conversions; the rest
      could be left to the writer? That way we avoid having too many rules (Jerry
      in background...).

      Cheers
      Roger Caffin
      PS: BYO: BRING your own... usually refers to alcohol, in Oz.
    • Graham Blamey
      ... (some few ... old woman ... She got ... ...and in the UK. Fairly recently, a butcher in the North of England was successfully prosecuted (and IIRC elected
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 30, 2003
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        --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "R Caffin" <r.caffin@t...>
        > Funny story. France has been metric for a LONG time, right? But
        (some few
        > years ago) we were in a local french town market, and I heard an
        old woman
        > ask the stall owner for "a pound of butter" (in French of course).
        She got
        > 500 g. Clearly, old habits die hard in the French countryside!

        ...and in the UK. Fairly recently, a butcher in the North of England
        was successfully prosecuted (and IIRC elected to go to jail) for
        continuing to sell his sausages in pounds. Tough on crime eh :)
        Graham
      • Michael Doughty
        In german markets ein pfund = 500 g. A common expression for a half kilo. woe. ... course). ... England
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 30, 2003
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          In german markets "ein pfund" = 500 g. A common expression for a half
          kilo.

          woe.


          --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "Graham Blamey" <gg@h...>
          wrote:
          > --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "R Caffin" <r.caffin@t...>
          > > Funny story. France has been metric for a LONG time, right? But
          > (some few
          > > years ago) we were in a local french town market, and I heard an
          > old woman
          > > ask the stall owner for "a pound of butter" (in French of
          course).
          > She got
          > > 500 g. Clearly, old habits die hard in the French countryside!
          >
          > ...and in the UK. Fairly recently, a butcher in the North of
          England
          > was successfully prosecuted (and IIRC elected to go to jail) for
          > continuing to sell his sausages in pounds. Tough on crime eh :)
          > Graham
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