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EDIT: Jamie: Tektite Trek Lithium

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  • George G
    Hi Jamie Thanks for a nice report, please find some edits for your attention. When the edits are done, please upload to the main BGT.org site. Thanks George
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 2, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Jamie

      Thanks for a nice report, please find some edits for your attention.

      When the edits are done, please upload to the main BGT.org site.

      Thanks

      George
      Tektite Trek Lithium Light Monitor


      Long-Term Report - TekTite ### Tektite ### Trek Lithium Light (formerly known as the
      Micra Lithium)

      ### Either Long-term or Long Term ###

      October 28th 2003

      Personal Information
      Jamie J. DeBenedetto
      Female, 30 years young
      Height: 5'11" (1.80 m)
      Weight: 160 lbs. (73 kg) ### lb ###
      Email: jdeben@...
      State/Country: The Grand Canyon State - Arizona, USA

      My Background/Experience
      I've spent much of my thirty years hiking, camping, fishing,
      backpacking, rafting, and more recently kayaking, all over my home
      state of Arizona. I've also done a small amount of hiking in the
      neighboring states of Colorado and California. In January of 1999 I
      founded a local outdoor club called the Canine Hiking Club of
      Arizona. I lead one or two single or multi-day hikes per month with
      the club in various locations around the state. I also day hike in
      local recreation areas near my home a couple of times a week and my
      family and I sneak away for camping trips whenever possible.

      My backpacking style definitely leans more toward lightweight, but I
      wouldn't consider myself to be anywhere close to an ultra-light
      hiker. I use a hammock instead of a tent most of the time and I try
      to keep my pack's base weight below 15 lbs ### lb ### (7 kg). I'm always
      looking for ways to stay comfortable in the field and for gear that
      has more than one function.

      Experience Relative to this Test Series
      I do quite a bit of night hiking, either with my hiking club or with
      my dog. I'm on the trails after dark several times throughout the
      year but more often in the summer months when nighttime ### night-time ### is really the
      only respite, albeit a minor one, from the extreme temperatures of
      the desert Southwest. I am new to using LED lights. Up till now all
      of the flashlights I have used have run on conventional alkaline
      batteries and have used standard filament style bulbs. My current
      hiking/backpacking flashlight is a Pelican MityLite. I also regularly
      use a Mini Mag flashlight when car camping.

      Product Information
      Manufacturer: TekTite Industries, Inc. ###Tektite ###
      URL: http://www.Tek-Tite.com
      Year of manufacture: 2003
      Listed weight: 0.11 lbs ( g) ### It maybe better to list the listed weight in ounces also needs grams weight ###
      Weight with battery: 2.1 ounces (60 g) as weighed on a U.S. Postal
      scale
      Body width: 1 3/8 inches (3.8 cm)
      Body length: 3 ¾ inches (9.5 cm)
      Lanyard length: 5 ½ inches (14 cm)
      Product description: The TekTite ### Tektite ### Trek Lithium is a twist-on,
      waterproof LED (light emitting diode) style flashlight. The one I am
      testing is made of black plastic and has two slits on either side of
      the handle. I'm assuming these would be used with straps if you
      wanted to attach the light to your hat brim, wrist or other object.
      The Trek also comes with a bungee lanyard, 3.6volt ### 3.6volt needs a space? ### Lithium battery,
      LED bulb, and the flashlight lens, which also has a built-in
      magnifying lens and a removable rubbery protective "shield".

      Location and Conditions of Tests in the Field
      In the six months I've had the Tektite Trek Lithium I've used it
      around my house and yard, on several night hikes, while camping and
      on one overnight backpack trip. Most of the night hikes took place
      on desert trails near my home - elevations around the 1,500 ft (460
      m) to 2,500 ft (760 m) level. Temperatures ranged from hot (low 90's
      F - 32 C) to really hot (110 F - 43 C) depending on which month of
      the summer it was. The rest of my trips were at higher elevations in
      the state so the temperatures were a bit cooler at around 35 degrees ###35 F ###
      F (4.5 C) for the nighttime ### NIGHT-TIME ### lows up to I'd say no more than 85 F
      (29.5 C) for the highs in the day. Elevations ranged from about
      7,000 ft (2,135 m) to 8,000 ft (2,440 m). Weather conditions were
      pretty mild for the most part although I did get a few short
      sprinkles on two of my overnight trips.


      ### Temperatures ranged from hot (low 90's
      F - 32 C) to really hot (110 F - 43 C) depending on which month of
      the summer it was. ###
      ### The temperatures in the brackets look confusing, as if you are getting C and F mixed up. ( I know it not :))
      Maybe expressing them like (110 F (43 C)) would make it less confusing ###


      Long-Term Report ### either Long-term or Long Term ###
      The little Trek Lithium is the first LED I have used and I'll be
      honest, prior to this test series I was pretty sold on my regular
      hiking companion the Pelican MityLite. I have happily owned the
      MityLite for several years and of course had countless other
      incandescent flashlights of all shapes and sizes. The idea that an
      LED could do all the jobs my regular light did and wouldn't need a
      battery change for 200 hours or a bulb change for 10,000 hours didn't
      really seem realistic to me. I guess it just sounded too good to be
      true. One great thing about life is that once in a great while
      things that sound too good to be true still end up being true. What a
      pleasant surprise.

      For the most part I found the Trek Lithium to be a very practical
      light for both everyday use and ### change AND to ALSO ### on and off trail duties. In the few
      months I've had it I put it through several different kinds of
      tests. Here is a list of some of the questions I asked about the
      Trek, how I answered them and what my results were.

      How true is Tektite's battery and bulb life claim and will the Trek
      prove to be reliable in the field?

      The 10,000 hour bulb life was much too daunting to really tackle in
      only six months but I figured I could give the battery life a go.
      From the first time I used the light I kept track of the amount of
      hours I used it. I new ### KNEW ### that would not be enough so to add to that I
      would often leave it running during the day or overnight in random
      places like my yard in full sun or when the sprinklers came on or in
      the refrigerator. I'm up to close to 50 hours and I haven't noticed
      any change in the light output at all. There is also no build up ### build-up ### of
      heat when it's left on for several hours, which is great in case I
      ever leave it running or it accidentally turns on while in my pack.
      Recently Tektite has made some changes to the Trek Lithium
      information on their website. Other than a name change they also
      upgraded the battery life to 200 plus hours instead of the original
      100. I think this is probably part of the reason my efforts to wear
      out the battery have been in vain. The extended life is just fine
      with me though.

      Reliability in the field has been the biggest hurdle for me as a new
      LED user. Don't get me wrong, it's great for in camp duties, map
      reading, searching for items in my pack, finding my way on the trail,
      and really anything I used the light for at close range. I'd say
      less than 15ft (4.5 m) the softer glow of the LED is sufficient. In
      fact, I like it even better than an incandescent for use in a tent or
      hammock because it is a softer beam, but there is a drawback. Beyond
      15 ft (4.5 m) it's pretty much useless ### useless, unless ### unless the item you are
      shining it at has reflective properties. Not much help in the middle
      of the night when you are searching the deep dark wood for the cause
      of that twig snapping! Even though I'm just kidding about the twig
      snapping thing, I had three separate times when I was out walking
      that I wished the little light [at] ### HAD ###more bulb power. This negative for
      me isn't a knock on the Trek. I understand an LED is supposed to be
      like this and I don't really mind the trade off ## trade-off ### for the extended
      battery and more durable bulb but as a new LED user it has been a
      source of change and has made me rethink about how I use my
      flashlight. Change is sometimes slow.

      What kind of abuse can the Trek take and can it survive me?

      I have managed to break just about every flashlight I have owned
      except the metal Mag lights. Even my MityLite, which is supposed to
      be nearly indestructible, has been replaced once already. There is
      no question the Trek Lithium is durable. I haven't run it over or
      dropped it off any major cliffs but I have dropped it several times
      into water, on the trail and onto the rocks in my yard to see how it
      would hang in there. My toddler has also taken a liking to it and
      has chewed on the handle and lens cover, dropped it on our kitchen
      tile ### tiles ###, and loaded it up with a bunch of rocks in the back of his Tonka
      truck. I've also given my dog a chance to punish the Trek. I had
      her wear it attached to her collar for a couple of hours while on a
      camping trip and about half an hour on one night hike just for fun.
      She's pretty sure footed but I know she banged it into a couple of
      fallen trees and at least three small boulders. After all that there
      are only a few scratches and little dents on the plastic handle and a
      couple of scuffs on the protective lens cover. The lens itself is
      still in new condition.

      <SNIP>

      Tektite has kept the Trek Lithium pretty simple and I say kudos to
      them for doing so. I love gadgets as much as the next person, okay
      probably more, but in my opinion the "keep it simple stupid" saying
      is right on for a piece of gear like a flashlight. Too many bells
      and whistles and I'm bound to loose them or break them or not need
      them on the trail anyway. Most of the extras Tektite has added are
      fun and useful. I have enjoyed having the option to use the rubbery
      lens cover as a stand. It works best on flat surfaces of course but
      with a little coxing ### COAXING ### has proved a handy alternative to holding the
      light in my mouth during tent duties or around camp while cooking.
      The bungee lanyard is another cool extra. I was very pleased when
      the Trek arrived with this substitute for the key ring, which was
      pictured on Tektite's webpage. The lanyard makes it very easy to
      attach the light to the ridgeline in my hammock, a tree limb when
      using the facilities and even the outside of my pack so I could grab
      it quickly without having to search through my stuff. I also like to
      be able to hang it from my wrist when I'm using it but need my hand
      free for a second. I hope Tektite sells replacements in case mine
      wears out before the light. Finally, Tektite as ### HAS ### placed two little
      slits on opposite sides of the LED presumably as attachment points
      for a strap or bit of rope if needed. I used these once to duct tape
      the light to the front of my boat while on a moonlight kayaking
      tour. I think in this case the light would [of] ### HAVE ### stayed on the boat
      regardless ### ; ### ### DROP BECAUSE ### because I was using something sticky to hold it on but I
      could see how this would be useful if I only had string and still
      wanted to fasten the light to something. The one feature that didn't
      really impress me was the magnifying lens. I went into more detail
      about my trials and failures with the lens in my Field Report
      (clickable). In short, I did not have any luck making fire with the
      lens and would not consider it a valuable extra as far as a survival
      situation goes.

      Summary

      As I wrote in my opening paragraph above, the Trek Lithium has been a
      pleasant surprise. I am still using this great little light and I
      will continue to use it as my regular backpacking, night hiking, and
      kayaking light. I hope I can find a useful place for my MityLite now
      that I have to kick it out of my gear to make room for the Trek. Its
      compact size and low weight, although comparable to my other
      flashlight, have made it hard to leave ### AT ### home. The lengthy battery and
      bulb life have given me the confidence to use it more for things like
      dressing in my hammock or using the bathroom, tasks I would normally
      do in the dark to save batteries. I think I have really put it
      through the ringer as far as durability goes and it's passed all my
      expectations. The extras are few but in my opinion, all except the
      magnifying lens ###, ### add to the overall usefulness of the Trek. My thanks
      to Tektite and to Backpackgeartest.org for the opportunity to
      participate in this test.

      J. DeBenedetto October 28th, 2003




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • chcoa
      Thanks George. I fixed most of the ones you found. I did not change nighttime becuase my spell checker and webster s say this is correct. I will have it
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 3, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Thanks George. I fixed most of the ones you found. I did not change
        nighttime becuase my spell checker and webster's say this is correct.

        I will have it uploaded to bgt tonight.

        Jamie


        --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "George G" <ggriff@t...>
        wrote:
        > Hi Jamie
        >
        > Thanks for a nice report, please find some edits for your attention.
        >
        > When the edits are done, please upload to the main BGT.org site.
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > George
        > Tektite Trek Lithium Light Monitor
        >
        >
        > Long-Term Report - TekTite ### Tektite ### Trek Lithium Light
        (formerly known as the
        > Micra Lithium)
        >
        > ### Either Long-term or Long Term ###
        >
        > October 28th 2003
        >
        > Personal Information
        > Jamie J. DeBenedetto
        > Female, 30 years young
        > Height: 5'11" (1.80 m)
        > Weight: 160 lbs. (73 kg) ### lb ###
        > Email: jdeben@h...
        > State/Country: The Grand Canyon State - Arizona, USA
        >
        > My Background/Experience
        > I've spent much of my thirty years hiking, camping, fishing,
        > backpacking, rafting, and more recently kayaking, all over my home
        > state of Arizona. I've also done a small amount of hiking in the
        > neighboring states of Colorado and California. In January of 1999 I
        > founded a local outdoor club called the Canine Hiking Club of
        > Arizona. I lead one or two single or multi-day hikes per month with
        > the club in various locations around the state. I also day hike in
        > local recreation areas near my home a couple of times a week and my
        > family and I sneak away for camping trips whenever possible.
        >
        > My backpacking style definitely leans more toward lightweight, but
        I
        > wouldn't consider myself to be anywhere close to an ultra-light
        > hiker. I use a hammock instead of a tent most of the time and I
        try
        > to keep my pack's base weight below 15 lbs ### lb ### (7 kg). I'm
        always
        > looking for ways to stay comfortable in the field and for gear that
        > has more than one function.
        >
        > Experience Relative to this Test Series
        > I do quite a bit of night hiking, either with my hiking club or
        with
        > my dog. I'm on the trails after dark several times throughout the
        > year but more often in the summer months when nighttime ### night-
        time ### is really the
        > only respite, albeit a minor one, from the extreme temperatures of
        > the desert Southwest. I am new to using LED lights. Up till now all
        > of the flashlights I have used have run on conventional alkaline
        > batteries and have used standard filament style bulbs. My current
        > hiking/backpacking flashlight is a Pelican MityLite. I also
        regularly
        > use a Mini Mag flashlight when car camping.
        >
        > Product Information
        > Manufacturer: TekTite Industries, Inc. ###Tektite ###
        > URL: http://www.Tek-Tite.com
        > Year of manufacture: 2003
        > Listed weight: 0.11 lbs ( g) ### It maybe better to list the listed
        weight in ounces also needs grams weight ###
        > Weight with battery: 2.1 ounces (60 g) as weighed on a U.S. Postal
        > scale
        > Body width: 1 3/8 inches (3.8 cm)
        > Body length: 3 ¾ inches (9.5 cm)
        > Lanyard length: 5 ½ inches (14 cm)
        > Product description: The TekTite ### Tektite ### Trek Lithium is a
        twist-on,
        > waterproof LED (light emitting diode) style flashlight. The one I
        am
        > testing is made of black plastic and has two slits on either side
        of
        > the handle. I'm assuming these would be used with straps if you
        > wanted to attach the light to your hat brim, wrist or other object.
        > The Trek also comes with a bungee lanyard, 3.6volt ### 3.6volt
        needs a space? ### Lithium battery,
        > LED bulb, and the flashlight lens, which also has a built-in
        > magnifying lens and a removable rubbery protective "shield".
        >
        > Location and Conditions of Tests in the Field
        > In the six months I've had the Tektite Trek Lithium I've used it
        > around my house and yard, on several night hikes, while camping and
        > on one overnight backpack trip. Most of the night hikes took place
        > on desert trails near my home - elevations around the 1,500 ft (460
        > m) to 2,500 ft (760 m) level. Temperatures ranged from hot (low
        90's
        > F - 32 C) to really hot (110 F - 43 C) depending on which month of
        > the summer it was. The rest of my trips were at higher elevations
        in
        > the state so the temperatures were a bit cooler at around 35
        degrees ###35 F ###
        > F (4.5 C) for the nighttime ### NIGHT-TIME ### lows up to I'd say
        no more than 85 F
        > (29.5 C) for the highs in the day. Elevations ranged from about
        > 7,000 ft (2,135 m) to 8,000 ft (2,440 m). Weather conditions were
        > pretty mild for the most part although I did get a few short
        > sprinkles on two of my overnight trips.
        >
        >
        > ### Temperatures ranged from hot (low 90's
        > F - 32 C) to really hot (110 F - 43 C) depending on which month of
        > the summer it was. ###
        > ### The temperatures in the brackets look confusing, as if you are
        getting C and F mixed up. ( I know it not :))
        > Maybe expressing them like (110 F (43 C)) would make it less
        confusing ###
        >
        >
        > Long-Term Report ### either Long-term or Long Term ###
        > The little Trek Lithium is the first LED I have used and I'll be
        > honest, prior to this test series I was pretty sold on my regular
        > hiking companion the Pelican MityLite. I have happily owned the
        > MityLite for several years and of course had countless other
        > incandescent flashlights of all shapes and sizes. The idea that an
        > LED could do all the jobs my regular light did and wouldn't need a
        > battery change for 200 hours or a bulb change for 10,000 hours
        didn't
        > really seem realistic to me. I guess it just sounded too good to
        be
        > true. One great thing about life is that once in a great while
        > things that sound too good to be true still end up being true. What
        a
        > pleasant surprise.
        >
        > For the most part I found the Trek Lithium to be a very practical
        > light for both everyday use and ### change AND to ALSO ### on and
        off trail duties. In the few
        > months I've had it I put it through several different kinds of
        > tests. Here is a list of some of the questions I asked about the
        > Trek, how I answered them and what my results were.
        >
        > How true is Tektite's battery and bulb life claim and will the Trek
        > prove to be reliable in the field?
        >
        > The 10,000 hour bulb life was much too daunting to really tackle in
        > only six months but I figured I could give the battery life a go.
        > From the first time I used the light I kept track of the amount of
        > hours I used it. I new ### KNEW ### that would not be enough so to
        add to that I
        > would often leave it running during the day or overnight in random
        > places like my yard in full sun or when the sprinklers came on or
        in
        > the refrigerator. I'm up to close to 50 hours and I haven't
        noticed
        > any change in the light output at all. There is also no build up
        ### build-up ### of
        > heat when it's left on for several hours, which is great in case I
        > ever leave it running or it accidentally turns on while in my
        pack.
        > Recently Tektite has made some changes to the Trek Lithium
        > information on their website. Other than a name change they also
        > upgraded the battery life to 200 plus hours instead of the original
        > 100. I think this is probably part of the reason my efforts to
        wear
        > out the battery have been in vain. The extended life is just fine
        > with me though.
        >
        > Reliability in the field has been the biggest hurdle for me as a
        new
        > LED user. Don't get me wrong, it's great for in camp duties, map
        > reading, searching for items in my pack, finding my way on the
        trail,
        > and really anything I used the light for at close range. I'd say
        > less than 15ft (4.5 m) the softer glow of the LED is sufficient.
        In
        > fact, I like it even better than an incandescent for use in a tent
        or
        > hammock because it is a softer beam, but there is a drawback.
        Beyond
        > 15 ft (4.5 m) it's pretty much useless ### useless, unless ###
        unless the item you are
        > shining it at has reflective properties. Not much help in the
        middle
        > of the night when you are searching the deep dark wood for the
        cause
        > of that twig snapping! Even though I'm just kidding about the twig
        > snapping thing, I had three separate times when I was out walking
        > that I wished the little light [at] ### HAD ###more bulb power.
        This negative for
        > me isn't a knock on the Trek. I understand an LED is supposed to
        be
        > like this and I don't really mind the trade off ## trade-off ###
        for the extended
        > battery and more durable bulb but as a new LED user it has been a
        > source of change and has made me rethink about how I use my
        > flashlight. Change is sometimes slow.
        >
        > What kind of abuse can the Trek take and can it survive me?
        >
        > I have managed to break just about every flashlight I have owned
        > except the metal Mag lights. Even my MityLite, which is supposed
        to
        > be nearly indestructible, has been replaced once already. There is
        > no question the Trek Lithium is durable. I haven't run it over or
        > dropped it off any major cliffs but I have dropped it several times
        > into water, on the trail and onto the rocks in my yard to see how
        it
        > would hang in there. My toddler has also taken a liking to it and
        > has chewed on the handle and lens cover, dropped it on our kitchen
        > tile ### tiles ###, and loaded it up with a bunch of rocks in the
        back of his Tonka
        > truck. I've also given my dog a chance to punish the Trek. I had
        > her wear it attached to her collar for a couple of hours while on a
        > camping trip and about half an hour on one night hike just for
        fun.
        > She's pretty sure footed but I know she banged it into a couple of
        > fallen trees and at least three small boulders. After all that
        there
        > are only a few scratches and little dents on the plastic handle and
        a
        > couple of scuffs on the protective lens cover. The lens itself is
        > still in new condition.
        >
        > <SNIP>
        >
        > Tektite has kept the Trek Lithium pretty simple and I say kudos to
        > them for doing so. I love gadgets as much as the next person, okay
        > probably more, but in my opinion the "keep it simple stupid" saying
        > is right on for a piece of gear like a flashlight. Too many bells
        > and whistles and I'm bound to loose them or break them or not need
        > them on the trail anyway. Most of the extras Tektite has added are
        > fun and useful. I have enjoyed having the option to use the
        rubbery
        > lens cover as a stand. It works best on flat surfaces of course
        but
        > with a little coxing ### COAXING ### has proved a handy
        alternative to holding the
        > light in my mouth during tent duties or around camp while cooking.
        > The bungee lanyard is another cool extra. I was very pleased when
        > the Trek arrived with this substitute for the key ring, which was
        > pictured on Tektite's webpage. The lanyard makes it very easy to
        > attach the light to the ridgeline in my hammock, a tree limb when
        > using the facilities and even the outside of my pack so I could
        grab
        > it quickly without having to search through my stuff. I also like
        to
        > be able to hang it from my wrist when I'm using it but need my hand
        > free for a second. I hope Tektite sells replacements in case mine
        > wears out before the light. Finally, Tektite as ### HAS ### placed
        two little
        > slits on opposite sides of the LED presumably as attachment points
        > for a strap or bit of rope if needed. I used these once to duct
        tape
        > the light to the front of my boat while on a moonlight kayaking
        > tour. I think in this case the light would [of] ### HAVE ###
        stayed on the boat
        > regardless ### ; ### ### DROP BECAUSE ### because I was using
        something sticky to hold it on but I
        > could see how this would be useful if I only had string and still
        > wanted to fasten the light to something. The one feature that
        didn't
        > really impress me was the magnifying lens. I went into more detail
        > about my trials and failures with the lens in my Field Report
        > (clickable). In short, I did not have any luck making fire with the
        > lens and would not consider it a valuable extra as far as a
        survival
        > situation goes.
        >
        > Summary
        >
        > As I wrote in my opening paragraph above, the Trek Lithium has been
        a
        > pleasant surprise. I am still using this great little light and I
        > will continue to use it as my regular backpacking, night hiking,
        and
        > kayaking light. I hope I can find a useful place for my MityLite
        now
        > that I have to kick it out of my gear to make room for the Trek.
        Its
        > compact size and low weight, although comparable to my other
        > flashlight, have made it hard to leave ### AT ### home. The
        lengthy battery and
        > bulb life have given me the confidence to use it more for things
        like
        > dressing in my hammock or using the bathroom, tasks I would
        normally
        > do in the dark to save batteries. I think I have really put it
        > through the ringer as far as durability goes and it's passed all my
        > expectations. The extras are few but in my opinion, all except the
        > magnifying lens ###, ### add to the overall usefulness of the
        Trek. My thanks
        > to Tektite and to Backpackgeartest.org for the opportunity to
        > participate in this test.
        >
        > J. DeBenedetto October 28th, 2003
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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