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APPLICATION to Test BETA LIGHT Shelter - Fuzzy

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  • Fuzzy
    Here we go again. You miss 100% of the shots you don t take. Fuzzy ************************************ BLACK DIAMOND BETA LIGHT APPLICATION Please accept my
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 30, 2003
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      Here we go again. You miss 100% of the shots you don't take.

      Fuzzy
      ************************************
      BLACK DIAMOND BETA LIGHT APPLICATION

      Please accept my application to test the Black Diamond Beta Light
      shelter. If selected, I will probably also be interested in the Beta
      Bug. I have read Chapter 5 of the BackpackGearTest Survival Guide,
      version 1202, on 6/30/03 and will follow all requirements.

      Tester Bio:
      Name: Chuck Kime
      Nickname: Fuzzy
      Age: 37
      Gender: Male
      Height: 5'8" (172 cm)
      Weight: 229 lb (104 kg)
      Email address: ckime AT nelsononline DOT com
      City, State, Country: Norwood (Philadelphia suburb), PA, U.S.A.

      Co-Tester Bio:
      Name: Alex Kime
      Age: 12
      Gender: Male
      Height: 4'8" (143 cm)
      Weight: 95 lb (43 kg)

      Backpacking Background:
      Found at end of application.

      Backpacking Background applicable to this test:
      Following many years of trailer camping with the family, I
      experienced several years of camping Army-style in 2-man pup tents.
      Having moved through larger military tents, and now through various
      scout troop tents and a 10-pound Wal-mart 8'x8' family tent, I have
      begun experimenting with tarping in an attempt to lighten my load.

      Field information:
      I intend to test the shelter on upcoming Boy Scout troop or leader
      training camping outings – we try to camp monthly – and possibly on a
      1-night hike somewhere around Colorado Springs at the end of July.
      All of these outings will be taken with my 12-year-old son and will
      (with the exception of Colorado Springs) include a minimum of 2
      nights of camping, with temperatures expected to be from lows around
      25 to 30 ºF (-4 to –1 ºC) to highs around 95 to 100 ºF (35 to 38
      ºC). Elevations will range from sea level to approximately 2,000'
      (610 m) for a week of summer camp. I will also be spending a week in
      late July at Philmont Scout Ranch, elevation 6,500' - 12,441' (1,981
      m - 3,792 m).

      While I am not tall, I am also not a small person, requiring a fair
      amount of floor space – read that width – to lie down. My son
      usually curls into a very tiny ball, able to sleep in less room than
      I would need for my ALICE pack. I would test the shelter both solo
      and together, with and without gear inside, and include some evenings
      at home just for the fun of it.

      I also note that the Beta Light requires the use of hiking poles to
      set it up. I have been looking for an excuse to try poles (I
      currently use a single wooden staff), and this shelter could be just
      the kick in the pants I need.

      My main priorities with a shelter, and the items I expect to follow
      and report on, are as follows:
      · Ease/speed of set-up. Can I get it up easily in bad
      weather? When I'm tired? When it's dark out (I prefer to know all
      of my gear by touch)? How long does it take?
      · Pack size/weight. Experience to date tells me that bulk is
      more of a problem for me to pack than weight, since I have used only
      a 32-liter daypack for the past few months (love the Deuter!!).
      Black Diamond claims the Beta Light packs 50% smaller than the
      Betamid, although the pack size of the Betamid is not listed on their
      website.
      · Does it have everything I need for set-up? I see no mention
      of number of stakes required – or included. How about tie-outs
      and/or guy lines?
      · Dimensions. Do I fit? Comfortably? With my son and/or
      gear? How large a site do I need?
      · Durability. Are there any significant wear points,
      especially over time? The spots where hiking poles contact the
      shelter will be investigated, along with tie-out points, zippers, etc.
      · Waterproofness. I don't mind being wet, nor does my son, but
      we both prefer that our gear – particularly sleeping bags – be dry
      when we use it.
      · Ventilation. Do I need to worry about condensation?
      · Adjustability. How high/low can/must it be pitched?


      Previously Written Reports:

      Owner Reviews:

      Medium ALICE External Frame Pack (March 13, 2003)
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Packs/Internal%20and%
      20External%20Framed%20Backpacks/US%20Military%20ALICE%20Pack/Owner%
      20Review%20by%20Chuck%20Kime/
      -or-
      http://tinyurl.com/7grc

      Victorinox Climber Swiss Army Pocket Knife (March 14, 2003)
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Knives/Folding/Victorinox%
      20Climber%20Swiss%20Army%20Knife/Owner%20Review%20by%20Chuck%20Kime/
      -or-
      http://tinyurl.com/7hu1

      Leatherman PST Multi-tool (March 26, 2003)
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Knives/Multi-tools/Leatherman%
      20PST%20II/Owner%20Review%20by%20Chuck%20Kime
      -or-
      http://tinyurl.com/86vp


      Completed Tests:
      None at this time.


      Currently Testing Other Items:

      Deuter Futura 32 Day Pack
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Packs/Frameless%20Backpacks%
      20and%20Day%20Packs/Deuter%20Futura%2032/Chuck%20Kime
      -or-
      http://tinyurl.com/9rji

      Tektite Micra Lithium Survival Light
      http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Lighting/Flashlights%20-%
      20LED/Tektite%20Micra%20Lithium/Chuck%20Kime/
      -or-
      http://tinyurl.com/c5l4

      AntiGravityGear Mama's Kitchen Cook Set
      Selected and awaiting arrival.


      Backpacking Background:
      I started car/trailer camping with the family when I was about 5. I
      enlisted in the Army Reserve during my first year of college and
      spent 17 years fine-tuning my packing methodology - by the time I
      separated from the service, I was down to what I thought was a
      respectable 75-80 lb (34-36 kg) load. When my son started Cub
      Scouts, I brought my 60 lb (27 kg) ALICE pack for a weekend. We got
      to Boy Scouts in the Spring of 2002. We camp, monthly, in locations
      ranging from the Chesapeake Bay area (flat and lightly wooded), to
      the Pocono Mts (flat spots hard to find and very wooded), and in all
      seasons.
      Lightweight (and ultralightweight) sites have led me to seriously
      rethink my gear choices. I plan to start doing more
      hiking/backpacking on our monthly scout trips, taking along as many
      scouts as are willing, to a) get in shape (yeah, yeah, I know, round
      IS a shape), and b) determine what I really need to take along. I am
      relatively confident that I will be able to reduce my 3-season pack
      to 20 lb (9 kg), before food, fuel and water, by the time this season
      is over.

      Thank you for your consideration,
      Chuck Kime
      a.k.a. Fuzzy
    • Benedikt Moser
      Hi all, here is my field report on this awesome flashlight. Sorry for the last minute posting, but the weekend was too nice to write a report. Finally summer
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1, 2003
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        Hi all,

        here is my field report on this awesome flashlight. Sorry for the last
        minute posting, but the weekend was too nice to write a report. Finally
        summer is here in New England as well. Somehow spring must have missed us
        this year.

        Have a good day,

        Benedikt

        *******************************************************************
        Field Report by Benedikt Moser
        Tektite Mini-Trek Flashlight

        Personal biographical information at end of report.

        Manufacturer: Tektite Industries, Inc. (http://www.tek-tite.com/)
        Product: Mini-Trek Flashlight
        Year of manufacture: 2003
        no weight listed, measured weight: 77 g/2.7 oz
        MSRP: $34.95

        Product description:
        The product looks exactly as advertised on the web page apart from the color
        as I got it in black. The robust black plastic housing contains the 3 AAA
        batteries and features a clip and a bite tab. The bite tab has circular
        pattern of ridges to facilitate biting and a hole so the light could be
        fixed on a chain ring. The front part of the light consists of a plastic
        lens that is screwed on. The two parts are sealed with an O-ring. The light
        is supposed to be water resistant but the manufacturer warns that it is not
        for diving use. The plastic lens is covered with a rubber cylinder that
        protects against impact and eliminates stray light. The light is turned on
        and off by twisting the front lens.
        For battery removal the front lens is completely unscrewed and the
        LED-bulb-reflector-assembly is removed. The batteries are the exposed and
        can be removed one after the other. Numbers on the outside of the plastic
        housing indicate the order in which the batteries have to be installed.

        Field Information:
        I have used the Mini-Trek for about 4 nights during camping in Maine and on
        Cape Cod. All camping was on camp-sites at about sea level. Temperatures
        during the night varied from around 40F/5C up to 77F/25C. I was using a
        Salewa Northcape 2-person tunnel tent. One trip was car-camping, the other
        one was a cycling trip. The weather in Maine was pouring rain, Cape Cod was
        clear sky. I also brought the light along on many daytrips when I expected
        to return late or just as a safety precaution. I used it on evening climbing
        outings to unrig anchors after dark.

        Product Impression:
        Quality: The Mini-Trek is very robust. I dropped it numerous times from a
        height of about 1.5 m/60 in and it still works fine. The rubber cover seems
        to protect the plastic lens very efficiently. This robustness makes the
        light very dependable and it can confidently be used as main light without
        backup.

        Handling and performance: Overall I’m pretty impressed by the performance of
        this flashlight. It is very light weight and still the light output of the
        single LED is high enough to use it as the main light source for many night
        activities. The light beam has a fixed focus and is rather narrow but
        suitable for all activities I used it for, namely pitching a tent, cooking,
        walking to the bathroom, unrigging anchors, and reading in the tent. I haven
        ’t used it for longer night hiking so far but I think that the amount of
        light is sufficient for that as well.
        I added a key chain ring to the rear end of the Mini-Trek. I can now suspend
        the light easily in the tent and it makes a good reading light if the book
        is close to the center of the beam. Whether this is doable or not depends on
        the preferred reading position and on the tent construction.
        Removing the black rubber cover from the lens slightly improves the general
        illumination of the tent. The amount of light floating through the tent is
        enough to have a comfortable atmosphere for organizing the tent, chatting,
        dressing, etc. I feel that reading is only agreeable close to the center of
        the spot.
        The added key chain ring also makes it easier to hold the light in the mouth
        in order to have both hands free. This works pretty good but is only
        practical for short term. For longer periods the flashlight can be clipped
        to a base-ball type hat. If the beam points too high or low it has to be
        adjusted by moving the hat back and forth. That might not look very well,
        but who cares about the look. It’s dark!
        I still don’t like the fact that this flashlight is pitch black. If it is
        already dark and I’m looking for the light in the tent or in a bag it is
        hard to find. I would prefer a bright colored one.

        Battery lifetime: I used the light with the original batteries for a total
        of probably 2.5 hours. I did not notice any decrease in beam brightness so
        far. The light should hold up 10 hours of full light and several more with
        usable light according to the manufacturer. I will comment more on that in
        my long term report.

        Summary:
        A high quality flashlight with a good performance. I really like it.

        Future Test Plan:
        I will continue using the light on all future camping trips and on daytrips
        (either for an early morning start or a late return). I will focus on the
        battery lifetime and on field maintenance (i.e. how to change batteries in
        the dark). I will also test that light for water resistance, either by going
        out in a heavy rain or I will simply take it with me for a morning shower.
        Although it is not a diving light, I think it should survive accidental
        submersion for a short time. I will also test this.

        Personal biographical Information:
        Name: Benedikt Moser
        Age: 33
        Gender: male
        Height: 190 cm / 6’3”
        Weight: 73 kg / 161 lb.
        e-mail: airborn ‘at’ freesurf ‘dot’ ch
        City: Boston, MA, USA

        Background:
        I have been an outdoor enthusiast for more than 15 years now. My winter
        activities include downhill skiing (I was an active ski-instructor in a
        Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring (I’ve been
        a trip leader in the Swiss Alpine Club) and winter hiking. During the summer
        months I used to do some high alpine mountaineering (in Switzerland) in
        elevations up to 4200m/13,800ft. Here in New England I do a lot of hiking
        and rock climbing. The hiking trips are mostly daytrips with a few overnight
        trips planned for next summer in the White Mountains. My camping experience
        is mostly from extended bike travels through Switzerland, Italy, Scotland,
        Greece, and New England.
        Having reliable gear has always been important to me. It doesn’t have to be
        fancy (sometimes I actually prefer the low tech stuff that never fails) but
        it needs to be a good compromise between weight, robustness, ease of use and
        functionality.
      • Andrew Priest
        ... Ahh ... Bill Bryson country :-) Andrew -- http://BackpackGearTest.org : The most comprehensive interactive gear reviews and tests on the planet [Non-text
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 1, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          At 10:06 PM 01/07/2003, you wrote:
          >Hi all,
          >
          >here is my field report on this awesome flashlight. Sorry for the last
          >minute posting, but the weekend was too nice to write a report. Finally
          >summer is here in New England as well.

          Ahh ... Bill Bryson country :-)

          Andrew


          --
          http://BackpackGearTest.org : The most comprehensive interactive gear
          reviews and tests on the planet


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • tcoug7
          Very nice job Benedikt. I have very few suggestions. Thanks for the timely post. You guys make my job easy! Tim Field Report by Benedikt Moser Tektite
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 1, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Very nice job Benedikt. I have very few suggestions. Thanks for the
            timely post. You guys make my job easy!

            Tim


            Field Report by Benedikt Moser
            Tektite Mini-Trek Flashlight

            Personal biographical information at end of report.

            Manufacturer: Tektite Industries, Inc. (http://www.tek-tite.com/)
            Product: Mini-Trek Flashlight
            Year of manufacture: 2003
            no weight listed, measured weight: 77 g/2.7 oz

            EDIT: No weight listed…

            MSRP: $34.95

            Product description:
            The product looks exactly as advertised on the web page apart from
            the color
            as I got it in black. The robust black plastic housing contains the 3
            AAA
            batteries and features a clip and a bite tab. The bite tab has
            circular

            EDIT: The bite tab has a circular…

            pattern of ridges to facilitate biting and a hole so the light could
            be
            fixed on a chain ring. The front part of the light consists of a
            plastic
            lens that is screwed on. The two parts are sealed with an O-ring. The
            light
            is supposed to be water resistant but the manufacturer warns that it
            is not
            for diving use. The plastic lens is covered with a rubber cylinder
            that
            protects against impact and eliminates stray light. The light is
            turned on
            and off by twisting the front lens.
            For battery removal the front lens is completely unscrewed and the
            LED-bulb-reflector-assembly is removed. The batteries are the exposed
            and
            can be removed one after the other. Numbers on the outside of the
            plastic
            housing indicate the order in which the batteries have to be
            installed.

            Field Information:
            I have used the Mini-Trek for about 4 nights during camping in Maine
            and on
            Cape Cod. All camping was on camp-sites at about sea level.
            Temperatures

            EDIT: campsites

            during the night varied from around 40F/5C up to 77F/25C. I was using
            a
            Salewa Northcape 2-person tunnel tent. One trip was car-camping, the
            other
            one was a cycling trip. The weather in Maine was pouring rain, Cape
            Cod was
            clear sky. I also brought the light along on many daytrips when I
            expected

            EDIT: day trips
            to return late or just as a safety precaution. I used it on evening
            climbing
            outings to unrig anchors after dark.

            Product Impression:
            Quality: The Mini-Trek is very robust. I dropped it numerous times
            from a
            height of about 1.5 m/60 in and it still works fine. The rubber cover
            seems
            to protect the plastic lens very efficiently. This robustness makes
            the
            light very dependable and it can confidently be used as main light
            without
            backup.

            Handling and performance: Overall I'm pretty impressed by the
            performance of
            this flashlight. It is very light weight and still the light output
            of the
            single LED is high enough to use it as the main light source for many
            night
            activities. The light beam has a fixed focus and is rather narrow but
            suitable for all activities I used it for, namely pitching a tent,
            cooking,
            walking to the bathroom, unrigging anchors, and reading in the tent.
            I haven
            't used it for longer night hiking so far but I think that the amount
            of
            light is sufficient for that as well.
            I added a key chain ring to the rear end of the Mini-Trek. I can now
            suspend
            the light easily in the tent and it makes a good reading light if the
            book
            is close to the center of the beam. Whether this is doable or not
            depends on
            the preferred reading position and on the tent construction.
            Removing the black rubber cover from the lens slightly improves the
            general
            illumination of the tent. The amount of light floating through the
            tent is
            enough to have a comfortable atmosphere for organizing the tent,
            chatting,
            dressing, etc. I feel that reading is only agreeable close to the
            center of
            the spot.
            The added key chain ring also makes it easier to hold the light in
            the mouth
            in order to have both hands free. This works pretty good but is only
            practical for short term. For longer periods the flashlight can be
            clipped
            to a base-ball type hat. If the beam points too high or low it has to
            be
            adjusted by moving the hat back and forth. That might not look very
            well,
            but who cares about the look. It's dark!
            I still don't like the fact that this flashlight is pitch black. If
            it is
            already dark and I'm looking for the light in the tent or in a bag it
            is
            hard to find. I would prefer a bright colored one.

            Battery lifetime: I used the light with the original batteries for a
            total
            of probably 2.5 hours. I did not notice any decrease in beam
            brightness so
            far. The light should hold up 10 hours of full light and several more
            with
            usable light according to the manufacturer. I will comment more on
            that in
            my long term report.

            Summary:
            A high quality flashlight with a good performance. I really like it.

            Future Test Plan:
            I will continue using the light on all future camping trips and on
            daytrips

            EDIT: day trips


            (either for an early morning start or a late return). I will focus on
            the
            battery lifetime and on field maintenance (i.e. how to change
            batteries in
            the dark). I will also test that light for water resistance, either
            by going
            out in a heavy rain or I will simply take it with me for a morning
            shower.
            Although it is not a diving light, I think it should survive
            accidental
            submersion for a short time. I will also test this.

            Personal biographical Information:
            Name: Benedikt Moser
            Age: 33
            Gender: male
            Height: 190 cm / 6'3"
            Weight: 73 kg / 161 lb.
            e-mail: airborn `at' freesurf `dot' ch
            City: Boston, MA, USA

            Background:
            I have been an outdoor enthusiast for more than 15 years now. My
            winter
            activities include downhill skiing (I was an active ski-instructor in
            a
            Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring
            (I've been

            COMMENT: Skitouring - are you sure on this spelling, it looks funny!


            a trip leader in the Swiss Alpine Club) and winter hiking. During the
            summer
            months I used to do some high alpine mountaineering (in Switzerland)
            in
            elevations up to 4200m/13,800ft. Here in New England I do a lot of
            hiking
            and rock climbing. The hiking trips are mostly daytrips with a few
            overnight

            EDIT: day trips


            trips planned for next summer in the White Mountains. My camping
            experience
            is mostly from extended bike travels through Switzerland, Italy,
            Scotland,
            Greece, and New England.
            Having reliable gear has always been important to me. It doesn't have
            to be
            fancy (sometimes I actually prefer the low tech stuff that never
            fails) but
            it needs to be a good compromise between weight, robustness, ease of
            use and
            functionality.
          • tcoug7
            Sorry about the double post. I forgot to change the subject line... Tim ... the ... 3 ... could ... The ... it ... exposed ... Maine ... using ... the ...
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 1, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              Sorry about the double post. I forgot to change the subject line...

              Tim

              --- In BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com, "tcoug7" <tcoug7@a...> wrote:
              > Very nice job Benedikt. I have very few suggestions. Thanks for
              the
              > timely post. You guys make my job easy!
              >
              > Tim
              >
              >
              > Field Report by Benedikt Moser
              > Tektite Mini-Trek Flashlight
              >
              > Personal biographical information at end of report.
              >
              > Manufacturer: Tektite Industries, Inc. (http://www.tek-tite.com/)
              > Product: Mini-Trek Flashlight
              > Year of manufacture: 2003
              > no weight listed, measured weight: 77 g/2.7 oz
              >
              > EDIT: No weight listed…
              >
              > MSRP: $34.95
              >
              > Product description:
              > The product looks exactly as advertised on the web page apart from
              > the color
              > as I got it in black. The robust black plastic housing contains the
              3
              > AAA
              > batteries and features a clip and a bite tab. The bite tab has
              > circular
              >
              > EDIT: The bite tab has a circular…
              >
              > pattern of ridges to facilitate biting and a hole so the light
              could
              > be
              > fixed on a chain ring. The front part of the light consists of a
              > plastic
              > lens that is screwed on. The two parts are sealed with an O-ring.
              The
              > light
              > is supposed to be water resistant but the manufacturer warns that
              it
              > is not
              > for diving use. The plastic lens is covered with a rubber cylinder
              > that
              > protects against impact and eliminates stray light. The light is
              > turned on
              > and off by twisting the front lens.
              > For battery removal the front lens is completely unscrewed and the
              > LED-bulb-reflector-assembly is removed. The batteries are the
              exposed
              > and
              > can be removed one after the other. Numbers on the outside of the
              > plastic
              > housing indicate the order in which the batteries have to be
              > installed.
              >
              > Field Information:
              > I have used the Mini-Trek for about 4 nights during camping in
              Maine
              > and on
              > Cape Cod. All camping was on camp-sites at about sea level.
              > Temperatures
              >
              > EDIT: campsites
              >
              > during the night varied from around 40F/5C up to 77F/25C. I was
              using
              > a
              > Salewa Northcape 2-person tunnel tent. One trip was car-camping,
              the
              > other
              > one was a cycling trip. The weather in Maine was pouring rain, Cape
              > Cod was
              > clear sky. I also brought the light along on many daytrips when I
              > expected
              >
              > EDIT: day trips
              > to return late or just as a safety precaution. I used it on evening
              > climbing
              > outings to unrig anchors after dark.
              >
              > Product Impression:
              > Quality: The Mini-Trek is very robust. I dropped it numerous times
              > from a
              > height of about 1.5 m/60 in and it still works fine. The rubber
              cover
              > seems
              > to protect the plastic lens very efficiently. This robustness makes
              > the
              > light very dependable and it can confidently be used as main light
              > without
              > backup.
              >
              > Handling and performance: Overall I'm pretty impressed by the
              > performance of
              > this flashlight. It is very light weight and still the light output
              > of the
              > single LED is high enough to use it as the main light source for
              many
              > night
              > activities. The light beam has a fixed focus and is rather narrow
              but
              > suitable for all activities I used it for, namely pitching a tent,
              > cooking,
              > walking to the bathroom, unrigging anchors, and reading in the
              tent.
              > I haven
              > 't used it for longer night hiking so far but I think that the
              amount
              > of
              > light is sufficient for that as well.
              > I added a key chain ring to the rear end of the Mini-Trek. I can
              now
              > suspend
              > the light easily in the tent and it makes a good reading light if
              the
              > book
              > is close to the center of the beam. Whether this is doable or not
              > depends on
              > the preferred reading position and on the tent construction.
              > Removing the black rubber cover from the lens slightly improves the
              > general
              > illumination of the tent. The amount of light floating through the
              > tent is
              > enough to have a comfortable atmosphere for organizing the tent,
              > chatting,
              > dressing, etc. I feel that reading is only agreeable close to the
              > center of
              > the spot.
              > The added key chain ring also makes it easier to hold the light in
              > the mouth
              > in order to have both hands free. This works pretty good but is only
              > practical for short term. For longer periods the flashlight can be
              > clipped
              > to a base-ball type hat. If the beam points too high or low it has
              to
              > be
              > adjusted by moving the hat back and forth. That might not look very
              > well,
              > but who cares about the look. It's dark!
              > I still don't like the fact that this flashlight is pitch black. If
              > it is
              > already dark and I'm looking for the light in the tent or in a bag
              it
              > is
              > hard to find. I would prefer a bright colored one.
              >
              > Battery lifetime: I used the light with the original batteries for
              a
              > total
              > of probably 2.5 hours. I did not notice any decrease in beam
              > brightness so
              > far. The light should hold up 10 hours of full light and several
              more
              > with
              > usable light according to the manufacturer. I will comment more on
              > that in
              > my long term report.
              >
              > Summary:
              > A high quality flashlight with a good performance. I really like it.
              >
              > Future Test Plan:
              > I will continue using the light on all future camping trips and on
              > daytrips
              >
              > EDIT: day trips
              >
              >
              > (either for an early morning start or a late return). I will focus
              on
              > the
              > battery lifetime and on field maintenance (i.e. how to change
              > batteries in
              > the dark). I will also test that light for water resistance, either
              > by going
              > out in a heavy rain or I will simply take it with me for a morning
              > shower.
              > Although it is not a diving light, I think it should survive
              > accidental
              > submersion for a short time. I will also test this.
              >
              > Personal biographical Information:
              > Name: Benedikt Moser
              > Age: 33
              > Gender: male
              > Height: 190 cm / 6'3"
              > Weight: 73 kg / 161 lb.
              > e-mail: airborn `at' freesurf `dot' ch
              > City: Boston, MA, USA
              >
              > Background:
              > I have been an outdoor enthusiast for more than 15 years now. My
              > winter
              > activities include downhill skiing (I was an active ski-instructor
              in
              > a
              > Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring
              > (I've been
              >
              > COMMENT: Skitouring - are you sure on this spelling, it looks
              funny!
              >
              >
              > a trip leader in the Swiss Alpine Club) and winter hiking. During
              the
              > summer
              > months I used to do some high alpine mountaineering (in
              Switzerland)
              > in
              > elevations up to 4200m/13,800ft. Here in New England I do a lot of
              > hiking
              > and rock climbing. The hiking trips are mostly daytrips with a few
              > overnight
              >
              > EDIT: day trips
              >
              >
              > trips planned for next summer in the White Mountains. My camping
              > experience
              > is mostly from extended bike travels through Switzerland, Italy,
              > Scotland,
              > Greece, and New England.
              > Having reliable gear has always been important to me. It doesn't
              have
              > to be
              > fancy (sometimes I actually prefer the low tech stuff that never
              > fails) but
              > it needs to be a good compromise between weight, robustness, ease
              of
              > use and
              > functionality.
            • Andrew Priest
              ... Hi I would probably go with ski-touring, but I haven t checked the dictionaries. At the end of the day, not a big issue. Andrew Chief Edit Moderator --
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 2, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                At 01:18 PM 02/07/2003, you wrote:

                >Background:
                >I have been an outdoor enthusiast for more than 15 years now. My
                >winter
                >activities include downhill skiing (I was an active ski-instructor in
                >a
                >Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring
                >(I've been
                >
                >COMMENT: Skitouring - are you sure on this spelling, it looks funny!

                Hi

                I would probably go with ski-touring, but I haven't checked the
                dictionaries. At the end of the day, not a big issue.

                Andrew
                Chief Edit Moderator

                --
                http://BackpackGearTest.org : The most comprehensive interactive gear
                reviews and tests on the planet


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Benedikt Moser
                Hi Tim, thanks for your edits. I revised accordingly and will upload as soon as the server problem is solved. ... My spell-checker suggests ski touring . I
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 2, 2003
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Tim,

                  thanks for your edits. I revised accordingly and will upload as soon as the
                  server problem is solved.

                  >>Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring
                  >>(I've been
                  >>
                  >>COMMENT: Skitouring - are you sure on this spelling, it looks funny!>
                  >
                  >Hi
                  >
                  >I would probably go with ski-touring, but I haven't checked the
                  >dictionaries. At the end of the day, not a big issue.
                  >
                  >Andrew
                  >Chief Edit Moderator
                  My spell-checker suggests "ski touring". I think I'll take this.

                  Andrew, have a great day in "the sunburned country" ;-)

                  Greets from Bill Bryson country.

                  Benedikt





                  >-----Original Message-----
                  >From: tcoug7 [mailto:tcoug7@...]
                  >Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2003 1:19 AM
                  >To: BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com
                  >Subject: [BackpackGearTest] Re: Field Report Mini-Trek Flashlight
                  >
                  >
                  >Very nice job Benedikt. I have very few suggestions. Thanks for the
                  >timely post. You guys make my job easy!
                  >
                  >Tim
                  >
                  >
                  >Field Report by Benedikt Moser
                  >Tektite Mini-Trek Flashlight
                  >
                  >Personal biographical information at end of report.
                  >
                  >Manufacturer: Tektite Industries, Inc. (http://www.tek-tite.com/)
                  >Product: Mini-Trek Flashlight
                  >Year of manufacture: 2003
                  >no weight listed, measured weight: 77 g/2.7 oz
                  >
                  >EDIT: No weight listed…
                  >
                  >MSRP: $34.95
                  >
                  >Product description:
                  >The product looks exactly as advertised on the web page apart from
                  >the color
                  >as I got it in black. The robust black plastic housing contains the 3
                  >AAA
                  >batteries and features a clip and a bite tab. The bite tab has
                  >circular
                  >
                  >EDIT: The bite tab has a circular…
                  >
                  >pattern of ridges to facilitate biting and a hole so the light could
                  >be
                  >fixed on a chain ring. The front part of the light consists of a
                  >plastic
                  >lens that is screwed on. The two parts are sealed with an O-ring. The
                  >light
                  >is supposed to be water resistant but the manufacturer warns that it
                  >is not
                  >for diving use. The plastic lens is covered with a rubber cylinder
                  >that
                  >protects against impact and eliminates stray light. The light is
                  >turned on
                  >and off by twisting the front lens.
                  >For battery removal the front lens is completely unscrewed and the
                  >LED-bulb-reflector-assembly is removed. The batteries are the exposed
                  >and
                  >can be removed one after the other. Numbers on the outside of the
                  >plastic
                  >housing indicate the order in which the batteries have to be
                  >installed.
                  >
                  >Field Information:
                  >I have used the Mini-Trek for about 4 nights during camping in Maine
                  >and on
                  >Cape Cod. All camping was on camp-sites at about sea level.
                  >Temperatures
                  >
                  >EDIT: campsites
                  >
                  >during the night varied from around 40F/5C up to 77F/25C. I was using
                  >a
                  >Salewa Northcape 2-person tunnel tent. One trip was car-camping, the
                  >other
                  >one was a cycling trip. The weather in Maine was pouring rain, Cape
                  >Cod was
                  >clear sky. I also brought the light along on many daytrips when I
                  >expected
                  >
                  >EDIT: day trips
                  >to return late or just as a safety precaution. I used it on evening
                  >climbing
                  >outings to unrig anchors after dark.
                  >
                  >Product Impression:
                  >Quality: The Mini-Trek is very robust. I dropped it numerous times
                  >from a
                  >height of about 1.5 m/60 in and it still works fine. The rubber cover
                  >seems
                  >to protect the plastic lens very efficiently. This robustness makes
                  >the
                  >light very dependable and it can confidently be used as main light
                  >without
                  >backup.
                  >
                  >Handling and performance: Overall I'm pretty impressed by the
                  >performance of
                  >this flashlight. It is very light weight and still the light output
                  >of the
                  >single LED is high enough to use it as the main light source for many
                  >night
                  >activities. The light beam has a fixed focus and is rather narrow but
                  >suitable for all activities I used it for, namely pitching a tent,
                  >cooking,
                  >walking to the bathroom, unrigging anchors, and reading in the tent.
                  >I haven
                  >'t used it for longer night hiking so far but I think that the amount
                  >of
                  >light is sufficient for that as well.
                  >I added a key chain ring to the rear end of the Mini-Trek. I can now
                  >suspend
                  >the light easily in the tent and it makes a good reading light if the
                  >book
                  >is close to the center of the beam. Whether this is doable or not
                  >depends on
                  >the preferred reading position and on the tent construction.
                  >Removing the black rubber cover from the lens slightly improves the
                  >general
                  >illumination of the tent. The amount of light floating through the
                  >tent is
                  >enough to have a comfortable atmosphere for organizing the tent,
                  >chatting,
                  >dressing, etc. I feel that reading is only agreeable close to the
                  >center of
                  >the spot.
                  >The added key chain ring also makes it easier to hold the light in
                  >the mouth
                  >in order to have both hands free. This works pretty good but is only
                  >practical for short term. For longer periods the flashlight can be
                  >clipped
                  >to a base-ball type hat. If the beam points too high or low it has to
                  >be
                  >adjusted by moving the hat back and forth. That might not look very
                  >well,
                  >but who cares about the look. It's dark!
                  >I still don't like the fact that this flashlight is pitch black. If
                  >it is
                  >already dark and I'm looking for the light in the tent or in a bag it
                  >is
                  >hard to find. I would prefer a bright colored one.
                  >
                  >Battery lifetime: I used the light with the original batteries for a
                  >total
                  >of probably 2.5 hours. I did not notice any decrease in beam
                  >brightness so
                  >far. The light should hold up 10 hours of full light and several more
                  >with
                  >usable light according to the manufacturer. I will comment more on
                  >that in
                  >my long term report.
                  >
                  >Summary:
                  >A high quality flashlight with a good performance. I really like it.
                  >
                  >Future Test Plan:
                  >I will continue using the light on all future camping trips and on
                  >daytrips
                  >
                  >EDIT: day trips
                  >
                  >
                  >(either for an early morning start or a late return). I will focus on
                  >the
                  >battery lifetime and on field maintenance (i.e. how to change
                  >batteries in
                  >the dark). I will also test that light for water resistance, either
                  >by going
                  >out in a heavy rain or I will simply take it with me for a morning
                  >shower.
                  >Although it is not a diving light, I think it should survive
                  >accidental
                  >submersion for a short time. I will also test this.
                  >
                  >Personal biographical Information:
                  >Name: Benedikt Moser
                  >Age: 33
                  >Gender: male
                  >Height: 190 cm / 6'3"
                  >Weight: 73 kg / 161 lb.
                  >e-mail: airborn `at' freesurf `dot' ch
                  >City: Boston, MA, USA
                  >
                  >Background:
                  >I have been an outdoor enthusiast for more than 15 years now. My
                  >winter
                  >activities include downhill skiing (I was an active ski-instructor in
                  >a
                  >Swiss Ski School in Switzerland), snowboarding, alpine skitouring
                  >(I've been
                  >
                  >COMMENT: Skitouring - are you sure on this spelling, it looks funny!
                  >
                  >
                  >a trip leader in the Swiss Alpine Club) and winter hiking. During the
                  >summer
                  >months I used to do some high alpine mountaineering (in Switzerland)
                  >in
                  >elevations up to 4200m/13,800ft. Here in New England I do a lot of
                  >hiking
                  >and rock climbing. The hiking trips are mostly daytrips with a few
                  >overnight
                  >
                  >EDIT: day trips
                  >
                  >
                  >trips planned for next summer in the White Mountains. My camping
                  >experience
                  >is mostly from extended bike travels through Switzerland, Italy,
                  >Scotland,
                  >Greece, and New England.
                  >Having reliable gear has always been important to me. It doesn't have
                  >to be
                  >fancy (sometimes I actually prefer the low tech stuff that never
                  >fails) but
                  >it needs to be a good compromise between weight, robustness, ease of
                  >use and
                  >functionality.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  >BackpackGearTest-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
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