Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Bibler Winter Bivy Long-Term Report

Expand Messages
  • wetlandnz <stu@bwpl.co.nz>
    Here it goes. Edit away. Happy New Year - Stu B Bibler Winter Bivy Long-Term Report ... Year 2002 Model Reviewer Stuart Bilby, male, stu@bwpl.co.nz, Age 36,
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 6, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Here it goes. Edit away.
      Happy New Year - Stu B

      Bibler Winter Bivy
      Long-Term Report
      ---------------------------
      Year 2002 Model

      Reviewer
      Stuart Bilby, male, stu@..., Age 36, 5'9" (176 cm), 176 lb (80
      kg)

      Website
      www.biblertents.com

      Testing
      Since my Field Report I have used the Bibler Winter Bivy twice in New
      Zealand in the snow; once with and once without a tarp. I have also
      used it for twenty-seven nights in Nepal, mostly under a tarp, but
      also with no additional shelter, under overhanging rocks and in cold
      houses.

      Minimum overnight temperatures varied from 1°F to 68°F (-17°C to 20°
      C). In Nepal the Bivy was useful for:

      Keeping the sleeping bag dry in rain, snow, spindrift, dew and frost,
      Backup for times when separated from the person carrying the tarp,
      Additional warmth,
      Keeping the sleeping bag clean, no need for a ground sheet

      Condensation
      In contrast to my earlier testing (see Field Report), on both recent
      nights in New Zealand, condensation or ice formed on the inside of
      the Bivy. This also occurred in Nepal on about seven of the nights.
      Condensation occurs when air touches a surface colder than its
      dewpoint for a given humidity. Often the surface of the Bivy either
      inside or outside was cold enough for condensation to occur. This is
      not a criticism of the Bivy because some condensation is inevitable
      in such conditions.

      Overall however the condensation seemed to be less than that
      occurring in my companion's old Gore-Tex bivy and I had the
      impression that the Winter Bivy is highly breathable.

      Size and Shape
      On several nights in Nepal I was cold, despite wearing all my clothes
      except my gaiters. On investigating, I discovered that when I zipped
      the Bivy up, it crushed the down at the foot of my sleeping bag. I
      was using a Macpac Neve sleeping bag, which only has down on the top,
      and a full-length Thermarest UltraLite inflatable mattress. This
      squashing of the down surprised me because in my earlier tests I had
      not observed a problem.

      It was less noticeable when using a synthetic sleeping bag,
      presumably because the synthetic fill resists crushing. Zipping the
      opening created tension along the top of the Bivy pulling it tight at
      the feet and preventing the down at the feet from lofting fully. This
      was exacerbated on any slope because slipping downhill pulled the
      Bivy tighter. Leaving the zip undone and my head out mostly solved
      the problem.

      Any person taller than me, 5'9" (176 cm) should check that the Bivy
      is large enough for them.

      Openings
      When using a Bivy sack on cold or rainy nights I like to leave a
      small opening over my mouth to breathe out of so as to reduce
      condensation. Once I had tied small strings on the zip tags this was
      easy to achieve. The zips have tags at both sides allowing the mouth
      opening to be adjusted from side to side depending on whether I am
      lying on my side or back.

      The opening to the Bivy naturally sits at a level between my neck and
      chest. I would much rather have it at the height of my mouth but
      pulling it up squashes the sleeping bag's down around my toes.

      Epic Fabric
      I have paid little attention to protecting the fabric from damage. I
      have slept on rocks and gravel on about ten nights with the Bivy
      against the rocks and a Thermarest on the inside. The fabric has
      lasted well with no damage and only a little scuffing of the satin
      finish on the underside.

      The seams are undamaged despite a few desperate struggles in the
      night to get out quickly.

      The fabric and the seams have not shown any signs of leaking in my
      use although I have only once used the Bivy with heavy rainfall
      directly on the whole bag.

      In dry conditions the fabric develops a static charge that attracts
      grass, chaff and dust. This became mildly irritating when packing the
      Bivy on the high pastures in Nepal.

      Summary
      The Bibler Winter Bivy is amazingly light, tough enough, highly
      breathable, and keeps rain out. I would prefer it to be a little
      larger with the opening nearer the top. Overall it is one of my
      favourite pieces of equipment and goes in my pack for nearly every
      trip.

      Backpacking Background
      I live in Auckland, New Zealand and have been heading into the
      mountains for 16 years. I am an experienced backpacker, tramper and
      climber and most of my trips are multi-day off-trail trips. I have
      done three trips trekking in the Himalayas. I love long trips up the
      remote gorges, forests and glaciers of the South Island's west coast.
      Over the last two years I have converted to a lightweight style.

      Thank-you to Bibler and BackpackGearTest for the chance to test the
      Bibler Winter Bivy.

      6 January 2003
    • John F. Meyer, Jr.
      Looks good, Stu. Thanks. P.S. I feel like I m in an English class or something, reading Mr. Bilby s report on the Bibler Bivy. :) And my spell checker says
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 6, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Looks good, Stu. Thanks.

        P.S. I feel like I'm in an English class or something, reading Mr.
        Bilby's report on the Bibler Bivy. :) And my spell checker says Stu is
        a Stud.

        ________________________________________________________________________
        John F. Meyer, Jr. jfm@... www.johnmeyer.net
        NASO, PSOA, GCFOA USARA, CFAR, NORBA, USAT, FTA
        (and BGT Bibler Winter Bivy monitor)


        #-----Original Message-----
        #Bibler Winter Bivy
        #Long-Term Report
        #---------------------------
        #Year 2002 Model
        #
        #Reviewer
        #Stuart Bilby, male, stu@..., Age 36, 5'9" (176 cm), 176 lb (80
        #kg)
      • dawnhark <dawnhark@yahoo.com>
        Nice series of reviews, Stu--I m sold! I was sold when they first came up for testing, but now I m even more sold, hehehee. I need one. Dawn
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 6, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          Nice series of reviews, Stu--I'm sold! I was sold when they first
          came up for testing, but now I'm even more sold, hehehee. I need one.

          Dawn
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.