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Updated Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe Reports

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  • rosaleen43@aol.com
    I ve updated my 3 reports on the Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe to HTML format and changed the headings to be more in line with our current guidelines.
    Message 1 of 2 , May 1, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      I've updated my 3 reports on the Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe to HTML
      format and changed the headings to be more in line with our current
      guidelines. Reposts follow:

      Initial report on Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe
      Manufacturer: hennessyhammock.com
      Tester: Rosaleen Sullivan and family
      E-mail: rosaleen43@...
      Date: May 23.2001/revised April 30, 2002

      We are performing a "family test" on the Safari. I am a new owner of an
      original Hennessy, in which I am truly impressed. I've slept in mine the
      last
      two weekends. I found I was comfortable, and, to my surprise, sleeping in
      the
      hammock DID NOT aggravate my chronic back and hip problems. My guys are all
      over 6 feet tall, up to 6 feet, 7 1/2 inches. The tallest son is about 290
      pounds. If he can be comfortable in a Safari, pretty much anyone up to 300
      pounds should be, as well.

      The Safari was on my steps when I arrived home yesterday. It came in a
      standard
      "Tyvek" mail envelope. It was in perfect condition. If the tarp can take
      shipping in this manner, it should take being hauled around in one's
      backpack.
      Because no one else would arrive home before dark, I proceeded to hang the
      hammock in our back yard to begin preliminary testing. It was raining and
      about
      40 degrees. We will practice setting up and finding the "touches" that make
      it
      comfortable in our back yard, planning a short packing trip along the
      Metacomet-Monadnock Trail in Central Mass. next month. Clear set up
      directions
      are printed on the stuff sack, making them easy to follow and darn hard to
      lose.
      The Safari comes with web straps rather than ropes for hanging. They are
      simple to use and did not slip on the trees. I used modified clove hitches,
      finishing with sort of a "necktie knot." So far, these held through to the
      next
      evening. The fly also has a web and clip connection system. All five of us
      have, in turn, stretched out in the hammock. All of us were comfortable
      lying
      on our backs. The side tie-outs help with the stability, so, as with the
      Original, one can turn over without the sensation (or fact) of falling out of

      the side. The lighter family members can lie on our sides comfortably, but
      not
      the two above 250 pounds. The hammock is tied, tightly, about 6 feet up the
      trees, and the hammock dips within two feet, maybe less, of the ground with
      the
      heavy guys. Tightening the straps more helped somewhat. We feel the hammock

      body may need to be made of a material with less stretch, or maybe a less
      generous amount of fabric, as a little snugness would go far in enabling side

      sleeping. The amount of stretch also factors into the rain protection the
      fly
      can give. The hammock appears covered until it stretches downwards under
      weight. In a serious blow, with shifting winds, a larger fly, or some
      creative
      shielding would be needed. The bug screening is more than adequate and
      allows
      great ventilation. The net gear bag hanging on the ridgeline is a nice
      touch.
      The Safari has a zippered opening, with a clever "ring and string" closure
      system. This string makes it easy to close the zipper when reclining in the
      hammock and easy to fumble and find under a sleeping bag when it's time to
      reopen it. The zipper is a nice touch that keeps feet from accidentally
      poking
      thru when one shifts position. One son raised a question of stressing the
      zipper and damaging it when exiting and entering. It seemed like a good
      point,
      so I examined that area more closely. The zipper is installed with the
      bottom
      at the far foot end, so the top, where it separates anyway, is centered where

      one sits. That area is excellently reinforced. From a seamstress's point of

      view, it should work very well. I am continually pleased with the
      engineering
      and quality of craftsmanship in Hennessy products.

      Summary of excellent points:
      · Lightweight: under 4 ½ pounds
      · Compact: fits loosely in a 12"x15" stuff sack
      · More comfortable than the ground. Rocky or uneven terrain not a
      problem
      · Soaking from the groundwater a non-issue
      · Need for mattress/padding reduced or eliminated
      · The suspension and netting separate the user from flying and most
      crawling
      insects, and many other night critters.
      · "Potentially" safer from lightning carried along the ground than in
      a
      tent.
      · Fast, simple assembly
      · The fly can be pitched with different angles or removed completely
      · Simple and difficult to lose directions

      Summary of undesirable points:
      · Hammock body seems to have too much stretch, resulting in less than
      optimal support for the weightier sleeper. With repeated use, perhaps the
      stretch limit will balance out with tighter strapping.
      · Fly may not provide adequate coverage in a serious storm. Again,
      with
      use, the body may stabilize and the fly issue may be correctable with
      adjustments.





      *****************************8

      Field Report: Hennessy Hammock, Safari Model
      Manufacturer: www.hennessyhammock.com
      Testers: Family of Rosaleen Sullivan
      E-mail: rosaleen43@...
      Shipping Date: May 2001
      Report Date: August 2001/Updated April 30, 2002

      Test Background info:

      A call went out for hammock testers who were over six feet tall and/or 240
      pounds, and who were already familiar with the Hennessy Hammock line.
      Rosaleen (Mom) Sullivan had recently purchased an original model with which
      she was greatly pleased, and the four male family members are all over six
      feet and weigh from about 160 pounds to nearly 300 pounds. One son is 6
      feet, seven inches tall. With the consent of the guys, we signed up for a
      family test.

      We have camped off and on as a family for close to thirty years, 15 of those
      years with Boy Scouts. We've used gear from canvas cabin tents and popup
      campers to open tarps and camped in places from Maine to California. This
      Safari has seen a lot of our back yard in eastern Massachusetts, and part of
      the Metacomet-Monadnock Trail in west-central MA. It's about to spend two
      weeks on the AT, a stretch covering part of PA, MD, and VA. Mom, this
      writer, has the mental ambition of her thirty-year old reined in somewhat by
      the physical reality of her fifty-something year old body.

      I (Rosaleen) am writing, so I'll input my observations first. While I'm 2-3
      inches short of the six feet, and, fortunately, below the 240 pounds, I'm
      most familiar with Hennessy's products and the one who got us involved in the
      test.

      The hammock arrived in a simple, unpretentious Tyvek-type mailing envelope.
      It has no poles or stakes to bend in shipment, so it arrived in perfect
      condition. It seemed to weigh the approximate 3-½ pounds one would expect
      from the labeling. Another tester actually checked his on a postal or
      similar scale and it weighed in correctly. I have access to a bathroom
      scale. The set up instructions are easy to follow and printed on the stuff
      sack, making them darn hard to lose. The stuff sack is generous enough to
      hold the hammock and fly, plus the stakes, reflective blanket, and 50 plus
      feet of nylon line that I like to carry.

      The Safari attaches to trees by means of web straps, similar to seat belt
      webbing. They are easy enough to use, on first examination, and should cover
      concerns about damaging tree bark, but we found that they stretch
      significantly more than the ropes on other models. One solution that worked
      for us was to attach to the first tree, at least shoulder height on the user,
      walk the other end back around the second tree, and pull the second web
      really tightly around the second tree, using body weight to effect major
      tension. I believe that Hennessy is switching to a different webbing to
      correct this problem next year. The user might want the feet just slightly
      higher than the head, to counteract any tendency to slide slightly toward the
      foot end during the night. The hammock body is especially roomy. At 5' 8" I
      could easily have pulled my whole pack inside with me. I can sit up, change
      clothes, or sleep comfortably inside it. The ridgeline can support shoes
      hanging from it, and has a mesh double pocket, plus two hooks for hanging
      small items. The fly can be left off in warm weather, or snugged down to keep
      out rain. This hammock has a zippered entry with an ingenious string and
      ring system that makes opening closing it very simple. As with the other
      models, lying in the hammock on a slight diagonal feels nearly flat. Again,
      the hammock has the advantage of being off the ground, and is much more
      comfortable than even the best inflatable backpacking mattress.

      We did find that rain leaked in at the ends. I had assumed, incorrectly,
      that it was sealed, as is the original model. Applying seam sealer to the
      stitching solved the problem. I slept in it in a couple of storms to make
      sure.

      My rating on the hammock is an 8 on a scale of 10. It's plenty roomy, but
      more than I need so I would normally choose a smaller size to cut weight.
      I'd like it better with less stretchy straps.

      Larry, Sr., at 6'2" and 260 pounds, found it comfortable and roomy, rated it
      a 9.5. He's over the weight rating on the original, so it's a good choice for
      him. Unless we go somewhere really exotic, he's likely to use it only in the
      backyard on lazy days. He's getting into the "whip out the plastic" and stay
      in a motel stage. Looking at the smaller models, he thought he'd feel
      claustrophobic in them, but was fine in the Safari. He, too, found it more
      comfortable than the ground.

      Larry, Jr., at 6'1" and about 160, is our thinnest. He fits in any model
      from the ultra light through the Safari. He really liked the extra room and
      feels it is worth the extra two pounds over the Ultra light to get the extra
      space. He is also young at thirty, and strong. He rates it a 9

      Sean is our big guy. At 6' 7 ½", he also has plenty of room in the Safari,
      and is too heavy for any other
      Model. He can sleep comfortably without feeling claustrophobic. He is also
      getting away from camping but sees an advantage to using it on a motorcycle
      trip. He gives the hammock a 10 for comfort and room, while admitting to
      preferring the idea of tent camping or staying in a motel if he travels with
      company.

      Dan is 6'3'' and about 229 pounds. Dan had plenty of room and was
      comfortable in the Safari, rating it a 9.
      Bonus opinions:

      Friend 1, 6,"4," found the Safari "awesome." Surprisingly comfortable and
      roomy. He has never camped, but would try it with a Safari.

      Friend 2, 5'6", about 170 lbs. Another awesome. He's a friend' s son, and a
      beginner camper. He was given a choice between using the Safari and the
      original, and was so impressed with the roominess that he chose the Safari.

      Summary:

      Tester Ease of set up Comfort Weight vs. size Roominess Climate control
      Overall
      RS 5 10 8 10 5, 10 after sealing 8
      LS, 1 8 10 10 10 9 9.5
      LS,2 7 10 10 10 9 9
      SS 7 10 10 10 9 9.2
      DS 7 10 10 10 9 9.2

      ******************************************8

      Field Report: Hennessy Hammock, Safari Model
      Manufacturer: www.hennessyhammock.com
      Testers: Family of Rosaleen Sullivan
      E-mail: rosaleen43@...
      Shipping Date: May, 2001
      Report Date: August, 2001/Updated April 30, 2002


      Test Background info:

      A call went out for hammock testers who were over six feet tall and/or 240
      pounds, and who were already familiar with the Hennessy Hammock line.
      Rosaleen (Mom) Sullivan had recently purchased an original model with which
      she was greatly pleased, and the four male family members are all over six
      feet and weigh from about 160 pounds to nearly 300 pounds. One son is 6
      feet, seven inches tall. With the consent of the guys, we signed up for a
      family test.

      We have camped off and on as a family for close to thirty years, 15 of those
      years with Boy Scouts. We've used gear from canvas cabin tents and pop-up
      campers to open tarps and camped in places from Maine to California. This
      Safari has seen a lot of our back yard in eastern Massachusetts, and part of
      the Metacomet-Monadnock Trail in west-central MA. It's about to spend two
      weeks on the AT, a stretch covering part of PA, MD, and VA. Mom, this
      writer, has the mental ambition of her thirty-year old reined in somewhat by
      the physical reality of her fifty-something year old body.

      I (Rosaleen) am writing, so I'll input my observations first. While I'm 2-3
      inches short of the six feet, and, fortunately, below the 240 pounds, I'm
      most familiar with Hennessy's products and the one who got us involved in the
      test.

      The hammock arrived in a simple, unpretentious Tyvek-type mailing envelope.
      It has no poles or stakes to bend in shipment, so it arrived in perfect
      condition. It seemed to weigh the approximate 3-½ pounds one would expect
      from the labeling. Another tester actually checked his on a postal or
      similar scale and it weighed in correctly. I have access to a bathroom
      scale. The set up instructions are easy to follow and printed on the stuff
      sack, making them darn hard to lose. The stuff sack is generous enough to
      hold the hammock and fly, plus the stakes, reflective blanket, and 50 plus
      feet of nylon line that I like to carry.

      The Safari attaches to trees by means of web straps, similar to seat belt
      webbing. They are easy enough to use, on first examination, and should cover
      concerns about damaging tree bark, but we found that they stretch
      significantly more than the ropes on other models. One solution that worked
      for us was to attach to the first tree, at least shoulder height on the user,
      walk the other end back around the second tree, and pull the second web
      really tightly around the second tree, using body weight to effect major
      tension. I believe that Hennessy is switching to a different webbing to
      correct this problem next year. The user might want the feet just slightly
      higher than the head, to counteract any tendency to slide slightly toward the
      foot end during the night. The hammock body is especially roomy. At 5' 8" I
      could easily have pulled my whole pack inside with me. I can sit up, change
      clothes, or sleep comfortably inside it. The ridgeline can support shoes
      hanging from it, and has a mesh double pocket, plus two hooks for hanging
      small items. The fly can be left off in warm weather, or snugged down to keep
      out rain. This hammock has a zippered entry with an ingenious string and
      ring system that makes opening closing it very simple. As with the other
      models, lying in the hammock on a slight diagonal feels nearly flat. Again,
      the hammock has the advantage of being off the ground, and is much more
      comfortable than even the best inflatable backpacking mattress.

      We did find that rain leaked in at the ends. I had assumed, incorrectly,
      that it was sealed, as is the original model. Applying seam sealer to the
      stitching solved the problem. I slept in it in a couple of storms to make
      sure.

      My rating on the hammock is an 8 on a scale of 10. It's plenty roomy, but
      more than I need so I would normally choose a smaller size to cut weight.
      I'd like it better with less stretchy straps.

      Larry, Sr., at 6'2" and 260 pounds, found it comfortable and roomy, rated it
      a 9.5. He's over the weight rating on the original, so it's a good choice for
      him. Unless we go somewhere really exotic, he's likely to use it only in the
      backyard on lazy days. He's getting into the "whip out the plastic" and stay
      in a motel stage. Looking at the smaller models, he thought he'd feel claustr
      ophobic in them, but was fine in the Safari. He, too, found it more
      comfortable than the ground.

      Larry, Jr., at 6'1" and about 160, is our thinnest. He fits in any model
      from the ultra light through the Safari. He really liked the extra room and
      feels it is worth the extra two pounds over the Ultra light to get the extra
      space. He is also young at thirty, and strong. He rates it a 9

      Sean is our big guy. At 6' 7 ½", he also has plenty of room in the Safari,
      and is too heavy for any other
      Model. He can sleep comfortably without feeling claustrophobic. He is also
      getting away from camping but sees an advantage to using it on a motorcycle
      trip. He gives the hammock a 10 for comfort and room, while admitting to
      preferring the idea of tent camping or staying in a motel if he travels with
      company.

      Dan is 6'3'' and about 229pounds. Dan had plenty of room and was comfortable
      in the Safari, rating it a 9.
      Bonus opinions:

      Friend 1, 6,"4," found the Safari "awesome." Surprisingly comfortable and
      roomy. He has never camped, but would try it with a Safari.

      Friend 2, 5'6", about 170 lbs. Another awesome. He's a friend' s son, and a
      beginner camper. He was given a choice between using the Safari and the
      original, and was so impressed with the roominess that he chose the Safari.

      Summary:

      Tester Ease of set up Comfort Weight vs. size Roominess Climate control
      Overall
      RS 5 10 8 10 5, 10 after sealing 8
      LS, 1 8 10 10 10 9 9.5
      LS,2 7 10 10 10 9 9
      SS 7 10 10 10 9 9.2
      DS 7 10 10 10 9 9.2
    • Helen Hillberg
      Rosaleen, Thank you so much for the quick response. The new reports look beautiful but the weirdest thing is if I click on your website and e-mail links I get
      Message 2 of 2 , May 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Rosaleen,

        Thank you so much for the quick response. The new reports look beautiful but the weirdest thing is if I click on your website and e-mail links I get file not found. It seems to be looking on the yahoo site. I have no idea what's wrong. Why don't you take a look and see if you get the same result.


        Rami, thank you too for your lightning fast fix.

        Helen

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: rosaleen43@...
        Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2002 4:09 AM
        To: BackpackGearTest@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [BackpackGearTest] Updated Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe Reports

        I've updated my 3 reports on the Hennessy Hammock Safari Deluxe to HTML
        format and changed the headings to be more in line with our current
        guidelines.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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