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Re: Why here/Where going

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  • DanB
    Welcome Jack, Glad to see the road map got you here. You might want to spend some time glancing over the old posts and click on the files to see whats
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 30, 2010
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      Welcome Jack, Glad to see the road map got you here. You might want to spend some time glancing over the old posts and click on the files to see whats available. It's been a bit quiet around here lately as most members seem to have their machines working but they are still around.
      Fire away with the questions whenever you are ready. The panels are off mine right now while some mods are waiting to be completed so it's easy for me peek at everything if that might help you out.

      Dan Brewer
      AKA Gime2much
      >
    • Tex
      Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You ve got a very smart daughter & son-in-law! First thing you need to do is read David Mankin s start up checklist: ES-1A Power
      Message 2 of 17 , May 1, 2010
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        Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!

        First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.

        After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?

        Tex

        --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
        >
        > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
        >
      • jack_burien
        I don t have a grinder yet. Previously I ve used one of those rotating blade devices, but have been informed that I need a burr grinder. That s as for as it
        Message 3 of 17 , May 1, 2010
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          I don't have a grinder yet. Previously I've used one of those rotating blade devices, but have been informed that I need a burr grinder. That's as for as it has gotten.
          I now have the machine up and running, having cleaned it up and taken a few things apart to clear the coffee remnants. My two sided gauge doesn't work on the left side, so replacement seems in order. Aside from that, everything seems operational.
          I do find the pump a bit loud, but I guess that's the nature of the beast.
          Thanks for the warm welcome...guess I'll go read the pdf and find out what I missed. j :-)

          --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
          >
          > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
          >
          > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
          >
          > Tex
          >
          > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
          > >
          > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
          > >
          >
        • jack_burien
          Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I d better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush.
          Message 4 of 17 , May 1, 2010
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            Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)

            --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
            >
            > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
            >
            > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
            >
            > Tex
            >
            > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
            > >
            > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
            > >
            >
          • Tex
            Here s the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8 wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur
            Message 5 of 17 , May 1, 2010
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              Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.

              Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.

              The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.

              http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429

              More suggestions to follow,
              Tex

              --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
              >
              > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
              >
              > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
              > >
              > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
              > >
              > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
              > >
              > > Tex
              > >
              > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • jack_burien
              Tex. You were correct in that the chamber is entirely empty; no long copper fitting or anything above. I m assuming that cafeparts in the place to get the
              Message 6 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                Tex. You were correct in that the chamber is entirely empty; no long copper fitting or anything above. I'm assuming that cafeparts in the place to get the pieces.
                What do you think of a Nouva Simonelli Model MCF grinder? I have a chance to pick up a used one in good shape.

                --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
                >
                > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                >
                > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                >
                > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                >
                > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                >
                > More suggestions to follow,
                > Tex
                >
                > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                > >
                > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                > > >
                > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                > > >
                > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                > > >
                > > > Tex
                > > >
                > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • jack_burien
                Tex Another question. My parts manual doesn t show anything in that chamber. I ve no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it
                Message 7 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                  Tex> Another question. My parts manual doesn't show anything in that chamber. I've no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it possible I have a different iteration, either newer or older? jack :-)

                  --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                  >
                  > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                  >
                  > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                  >
                  > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                  >
                  > More suggestions to follow,
                  > Tex
                  >
                  > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                  > >
                  > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                  > > >
                  > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                  > > >
                  > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                  > > >
                  > > > Tex
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Tex
                  Hi Jack, I d suggest looking for at least 60(ish)mm burr sets. The MCF 50mm will be turning faster and overheat the beans. The grinders I ve tried and
                  Message 8 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                    Hi Jack,
                    I'd suggest looking for at least 60(ish)mm burr sets. The MCF 50mm will be turning faster and overheat the beans. The grinders I've tried and recommend - Cunill Tranquilo, Mazzer Super Jolly, Rancilio MD50, Rossi (et al) RR45, La Pavoni ZIP, or any other 63mm burr grinder.

                    Tex

                    --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Tex. You were correct in that the chamber is entirely empty; no long copper fitting or anything above. I'm assuming that cafeparts in the place to get the pieces.
                    > What do you think of a Nouva Simonelli Model MCF grinder? I have a chance to pick up a used one in good shape.
                    >
                    > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                    > >
                    > > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                    > >
                    > > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                    > >
                    > > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                    > >
                    > > More suggestions to follow,
                    > > Tex
                    > >
                    > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                    > > > >
                    > > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Tex
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
                  • Tex
                    The gicleur lets the pressure in the group head ramp up, rather than having a full 9 bars of pressurized water hitting the puck. Your machine had the parts
                    Message 9 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                      The gicleur lets the pressure in the group head ramp up, rather than having a full 9 bars of pressurized water hitting the puck. Your machine had the parts when it left the factory. If the screen & gicleur aren't cleaned they plug up, and some service people/owners will just toss them rather than clean them!

                      Tex

                      --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Tex> Another question. My parts manual doesn't show anything in that chamber. I've no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it possible I have a different iteration, either newer or older? jack :-)
                      >
                      > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                      > >
                      > > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                      > >
                      > > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                      > >
                      > > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                      > >
                      > > More suggestions to follow,
                      > > Tex
                      > >
                      > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                      > > > >
                      > > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                      > > > >
                      > > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                      > > > >
                      > > > > Tex
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                      > > > > >
                      > > > >
                      > > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • jack_burien
                      Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I m guessing until I can fine one of those, I d better hold off on the remainder
                      Message 10 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                        Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I'm guessing until I can fine one of those, I'd better hold off on the remainder of the pieces. Is that part a standard for most machines? If so, then it should be available most anywhere. Suggestions?
                        Will look at the grinders you mentioned...thanks...j :-)

                        --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > The gicleur lets the pressure in the group head ramp up, rather than having a full 9 bars of pressurized water hitting the puck. Your machine had the parts when it left the factory. If the screen & gicleur aren't cleaned they plug up, and some service people/owners will just toss them rather than clean them!
                        >
                        > Tex
                        >
                        > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Tex> Another question. My parts manual doesn't show anything in that chamber. I've no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it possible I have a different iteration, either newer or older? jack :-)
                        > >
                        > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                        > > >
                        > > > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                        > > >
                        > > > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                        > > >
                        > > > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                        > > >
                        > > > More suggestions to follow,
                        > > > Tex
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > Tex
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • jack_burien
                        I ve found another page at cafeparts that shows the pin. Trouble is, there are two sizes, M6 and M8. Do you know which fits the machine, or do I need to
                        Message 11 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                          I've found another page at cafeparts that shows the pin. Trouble is, there are two sizes, M6 and M8. Do you know which fits the machine, or do I need to purchase both? This is the page:http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1531&ItemID=0
                          It appears that the left most diagram fits this head as the part numbers are the same as on the diagram on the url you previously sent.... j :-)
                          --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The gicleur lets the pressure in the group head ramp up, rather than having a full 9 bars of pressurized water hitting the puck. Your machine had the parts when it left the factory. If the screen & gicleur aren't cleaned they plug up, and some service people/owners will just toss them rather than clean them!
                          >
                          > Tex
                          >
                          > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Tex> Another question. My parts manual doesn't show anything in that chamber. I've no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it possible I have a different iteration, either newer or older? jack :-)
                          > >
                          > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                          > > >
                          > > > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                          > > >
                          > > > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                          > > >
                          > > > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                          > > >
                          > > > More suggestions to follow,
                          > > > Tex
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Tex
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • Tex
                          I ve never had to replace the long hex part, but others here have. Search for M6 and you ll turn up some conversations. Maybe someone can give you a list of
                          Message 12 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                            I've never had to replace the long hex part, but others here have. Search for M6 and you'll turn up some conversations. Maybe someone can give you a list of the part numbers?

                            Tex

                            --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I've found another page at cafeparts that shows the pin. Trouble is, there are two sizes, M6 and M8. Do you know which fits the machine, or do I need to purchase both? This is the page:http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1531&ItemID=0
                            > It appears that the left most diagram fits this head as the part numbers are the same as on the diagram on the url you previously sent.... j :-)
                            > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > The gicleur lets the pressure in the group head ramp up, rather than having a full 9 bars of pressurized water hitting the puck. Your machine had the parts when it left the factory. If the screen & gicleur aren't cleaned they plug up, and some service people/owners will just toss them rather than clean them!
                            > >
                            > > Tex
                            > >
                            > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Tex> Another question. My parts manual doesn't show anything in that chamber. I've no call out for the copper fitting or any of the parts above. Is it possible I have a different iteration, either newer or older? jack :-)
                            > > >
                            > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Here's the first nuts & bolts suggestion: Remove the larger of the 2 fittings on top of the group (7/8" wrench) and remove the spring. screen filter, gicleur jet, and o-ring, under the fitting. Use an 11/32" wrench to remove the long copper fitting these set on.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Now for the good part - probably 50% of machines I know about were missing the spring, screen, gicleur, and o-ring. If that's true for your machine don't panic, it'll cost ~$12 to buy them.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > The reason you want to remove these is to manually clean and descale them. Even descaling the machine won't keep these parts clean, so you have to figure on removing them once in a while for at least a look-see.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > http://www.cafeparts.com/productDetail2.asp?CatID=1429
                            > > > >
                            > > > > More suggestions to follow,
                            > > > > Tex
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > Just finished the pdf. Judging from the condition of the exterior and the plugged steam wand, I'd better go get a blind, detergent, and a good scrub brush. I'm guessing this beauty needs a good back scrub (flush). Thanks for the suggestion....more to follow. j :-)
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Tex" <Texas_Coffee@> wrote:
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Hi Jack and welcome aboard! You've got a very smart daughter & son-in-law!
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > First thing you need to do is read David Mankin's start up checklist: "ES-1A Power On.pdf" in the "Files > ES-1A information" section to the left. After that it's just checking the various functions to make sure they work. We'll have other suggestions after you've got everything set up and working.
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > After that it's all about learning how to make great coffee with your ES-1A. BTW: What grinder are you pairing with your machine?
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > Tex
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > > > My daughter and son-in-law are true coffee geeks. The other day an email informed me of a great buy on an espresso machine. I now own an ES-1A that burps and clangs, but does make steam. I've located a manual, but the internals are still a bit foggy to me. Tuning it to make a decent cup of coffee is going to need the touch of someone far more experienced that I. Right now I have no questions, but would like to ask advice and procedures at time passes. Thanks for letting me join the group. j :-)
                            > > > > > > >
                            > > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • DanB
                            ... Jack, Click on Files/Es-1A information/Bunns E61 Group 01.jpg. The parts you are missing are shown here. In at least one of the old posts is mentioned the
                            Message 13 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                              --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I'm guessing until I can fine one of those, I'd better hold off on the remainder of the pieces. Is that part a standard for most machines? If so, then it should be available most anywhere. Suggestions?


                              Jack, Click on Files/Es-1A information/Bunns E61 Group 01.jpg. The parts you are missing are shown here. In at least one of the old posts is mentioned the supplier and cost of these parts (cheap). Your machine will work ok without, but better with them.

                              Dan Brewer
                              AKA Gime2much
                            • jack_burien
                              Parts ordered thanks....big
                              Message 14 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                                Parts ordered thanks....big <G>

                                --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "DanB" <danrbrewer1@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I'm guessing until I can fine one of those, I'd better hold off on the remainder of the pieces. Is that part a standard for most machines? If so, then it should be available most anywhere. Suggestions?
                                >
                                >
                                > Jack, Click on Files/Es-1A information/Bunns E61 Group 01.jpg. The parts you are missing are shown here. In at least one of the old posts is mentioned the supplier and cost of these parts (cheap). Your machine will work ok without, but better with them.
                                >
                                > Dan Brewer
                                > AKA Gime2much
                                >
                              • DanB
                                ... OK, Ignore my last post. By the time I hit send it was redundant. If I am reading the old posts right the 6 and 8 refer to thread size in mm. I could
                                Message 15 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                                  --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "DanB" <danrbrewer1@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I'm guessing until I can fine one of those, I'd better hold off on the remainder of the pieces. Is that part a standard for most machines? If so, then it should be available most anywhere. Suggestions?


                                  OK, Ignore my last post. By the time I hit send it was redundant. If I am reading the old posts right the 6 and 8 refer to thread size in mm. I could remove mine and measure but yours may be different. Why not grab a 6mm and 8mm bolt at Home Depot and see which one fits?


                                  > Dan Brewer
                                  > AKA Gime2much
                                  >
                                • jack_burien
                                  Order in. I ordered the 8mm. I figured if it was too big, I d turn it down and rethread to 6mm....j :-)
                                  Message 16 of 17 , May 2, 2010
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                                    Order in. I ordered the 8mm. I figured if it was too big, I'd turn it down and rethread to 6mm....j :-)

                                    --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "DanB" <danrbrewer1@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "DanB" <danrbrewer1@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "jack_burien" <jack_burien@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > Okay. I sent a note to the cafe website asking about the long copper piece. I'm guessing until I can fine one of those, I'd better hold off on the remainder of the pieces. Is that part a standard for most machines? If so, then it should be available most anywhere. Suggestions?
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > OK, Ignore my last post. By the time I hit send it was redundant. If I am reading the old posts right the 6 and 8 refer to thread size in mm. I could remove mine and measure but yours may be different. Why not grab a 6mm and 8mm bolt at Home Depot and see which one fits?
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > > Dan Brewer
                                    > > AKA Gime2much
                                    > >
                                    >
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