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Re: [BUG] Re: Steam & faucet wands

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  • Robert White
    Jake, Thanks for the great info. The aluminum angle thought is great. I will let you know when I get back on it. Bob ... [Non-text portions of this message
    Message 1 of 20 , Feb 1, 2009
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      Jake,

      Thanks for the great info. The aluminum angle thought is great. I
      will let you know when I get back on it. Bob

      On Feb 1, 2009, at 1:21 AM, Jake Wilson wrote:

      > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, Robert White <bobwhitequail@...>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > Jake,
      > >
      > > Thanks for the thoughts. I have done the "walk away" just as you
      > > suggested. I plan to put the socket on the nuts next time rather
      > than
      > > use the adjustable wrench. I have not done anything with the flow
      > > meter yet.
      > >
      > > The comment about pay made me think ... Great espresso PRICELESS.
      > >
      > > Cheers, Bob
      > >
      >
      > ~~~Bob, I have a couple more tips that may help you to remove the
      > nuts used on some of your machine...
      >
      > Say you have a nut butted against another nut, or the valve with an
      > octogon fitting for a wrench. Rather than putting two wrenches at
      > great angles apart from one another, situate the handles of each
      > wrench so they are close to each other. That way you can grasp both
      > handles in one hand and pull together to free the nut. this way you
      > let the mechanical advantage work for you
      >
      > When I was pulling my water and steam valve apart the other day I was
      > using a vise to hold the valve body. My table vise was tied up
      > w/another job so I used my drill press vise to hold the valve, on a
      > flat surface then had wifey hold the vise to the flat surface while I
      > muscled off the nut with an adjustable wrench
      >
      > Here's a link to the vise I used
      >
      > http://tinyurl.com/cloazf
      >
      > At $10, it's indespensible. When I bought a table top vise way back
      > to attach to a work bench I built out of 2 bys (I used someone else's
      > plans) many moons ago, I couldn't justify spending what a nice
      > Wilton vise costs, but then I really don't do a lot of shop work so I
      > can get by with a cheaper vise but worth mentioning in the scope of
      > the parts we're disassembling, whatever brand or level of quality
      > vise you use, don't forget to hold your work using soft jaws if you
      > clamp brass parts in a metal vise jaw
      >
      > Copper soft jaws are nice but too spendy for me. What I did when I
      > first needed soft jaws was to go to a hardware and buy a length of 1"
      > angle aluminum (L) stock and cut it the length of my vise jaws. Two
      > pieces, one for each jaw (side). I use these jaws in both of the
      > vises I have. Aluminum is quite suitable for use as soft jaws when
      > clamping brass nuts, bodies and fittings
      >
      > As you probably know, most of the fittings on your commercial Gaggia
      > machine are brass so if you hold these soft metal parts in a steel
      > vise jaw, you can not only score the brass but you can also distort
      > the brass if you clamp too tightly. Not good on a threaded part
      >
      > Okay, just thought I'd throw that out there about the whys and
      > wherefores of using soft jaws
      >
      > Jake
      > Reddick Fla.
      >
      > > On Jan 30, 2009, at 12:59 AM, Jake Wilson wrote:
      > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ~~~Bob, I was just re-reading my reply and wanted to add a couple
      > > > things. On your citric acid question cleaning the flo meter. I
      > > > haven't done this but if you look in the files section, Tex
      > mentions
      > > > using flex tubing and a spare pump to run a citric acid solution
      > > > through the smaller tubing while it's off your machine, for
      > cleaning
      > > > purposes. i don't see why you couldn't do this with the flo meter.
      > > > If it shouldn't be done, I'm sure Tex will step up and make a
      > > > correction
      > > >
      > > > About breaking loose stubborn nuts...what I ahve done several
      > times
      > > > on my Futurmat taking it apart, if the nut is on there good and
      > the
      > > > pipe or valve is mounted solidly I'll rap the end of the
      > adjustable
      > > > wrench with my big rubber headed mallet, just to persuade it a
      > bit,
      > > > but I make sure when I hit the wrench/nut, it wont tweak a piece
      > of
      > > > tubing. Always make sure your work is supported
      > > >
      > > > And I double check the tightness of the adjustable wrench so I
      > don't
      > > > round the corners on the nuts, and most of them are soft metal
      > like
      > > > brass so be careful and mske sure your wrench fits snug
      > > >
      > > > Another piece of sage advice passed onto me long ago, if the piece
      > > > you are working on is giving you trouble, walk away from it and
      > come
      > > > back to it another time (tomorrow?) after your head is clear. All
      > > > the work I'm doing to my Futurmat, it's hobby work for me. i'm not
      > > > on the clock so I move forward looking at all of it as 'fun work'
      > and
      > > > not like a job that has to get done in a short amount of time.
      > Heck,
      > > > if i added up the time i have in all of this (working on my
      > > > Futurmat), I'm probably making 50 cents an hour=:-)
      > > >
      > > > Jake
      > > > Reddick Fla.
      > > >
      > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Jake Wilson" <sh8knj8k@>
      > > > wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, Robert White
      > <bobwhitequail@>
      > > > > wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I attempted to disassemble the steam & faucet wand head. I put
      > > > as
      > > > > > much pressure on the bolts as I was comfortable with but they
      > did
      > > > > not
      > > > > > budge. Are they left hand threads or is there some other
      > trick?
      > > > I
      > > > > > will shoot a little WD-40 on them in the mean time.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > What maintenance is preformed on the flow meter. Can you pump
      > > > the
      > > > > > citric acid solution through it?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Thanks for the help. Bob
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > ~~~Bob- I took off the steam and hot water valve,s on my Rimini
      > > > > earlier today. Right hand threads on my machine. I've yet to
      > come
      > > > > across a left hand thread anywhere. You probably know but it's
      > > > worth
      > > > > mentioning (IMO)...my Rimini is built in the same Gaggia
      > factory as
      > > > > your ES-1A was in Barcelona Spain, so I doubt they did anything
      > > > > radically different thread wise between these machines
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > All I used to remove the nuts was adjustable wrenches (sometimes
      > > > > referred to as Crescent (SP?) wrench). I have a fairly good
      > > > selection
      > > > > of hand wrenches (open and box), some sockets, all metric, but I
      > > > use
      > > > > the adjustable wrench more often than not when disassembling my
      > > > Rimini
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Jake
      > > > > Reddick Fla.
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >
      >



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