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Oil Extraction

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  • Paul Albert Acosta
    Here is the science behind the extraction process: The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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      Here is the science behind the extraction process:

      The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso its flavor and essence. The consequences of good oil extraction lead to finer taste and superior crema. The finer espresso grinds create a greater exterior surface area and exposes the bean to more steam (fluid) permeabilty into the bean. The group head educts air from its head space and the air trapped in the espresso grind compacted in the portafilter basket.

      The result of properly mettered saturated steam at the proper temperature is to facilitate the coffee (espresso) oil extraction. Resonance time of the extracting fluid (saturated steam) is key. It is better to have a moderate to slightly higher discharge temperature up to 204 deg F at the brew head which is mettered slowly (orifice, restriction, and compaction of grind) to maximize oil extration. The oil extracted along with air educted in the brew head and captured in the grind creates the formation of the creama by changing the cohesion tension of the fluid which allows and facilitates the formation of bubble (crema).


      If the grind is not fine enough or volume of steam is too great channeling will occur (beans will not be exposed or permeated/ penetrated). Channeling leads to less oil extracted.
      Low brew headfluid discharge temperature leads to a soupy mess left in the portafilter basket and less oil extraction.

      Espresso Regards,

      Paul Albert Acosta

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Robert Harmon
      Huh? I swear Paul, you must be related to Flasherly over on alt.coffee - I m not sure that I ve ever understood what you guys publish! What is extracted during
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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        Huh? I swear Paul, you must be related to Flasherly over on alt.coffee
        - I'm not sure that I've ever understood what you guys publish!

        What is extracted during a pull? Flavor compounds: some oil, yes; some
        gasses, yes. But there are also coffee solids extracted that contain
        flavor compounds. The gasses that make up crema are coated with oils -
        that's what holds the crema together.

        Pressure (CW holds ~9 bar to be ideal) is critical to extracting the
        *good* flavor compounds. Too long a pull results in over-extracted
        coffee, with compounds being extracted that diminish the tasted. Too
        short a pull results in under-extracted coffee, leaving the *good*
        flavor compound in the filter.

        As Illy noted in his article; ..."the hydraulic resistance of this bed
        of coffee grounds must be slightly less than the pressure of the
        steaming-hot extraction water, allowing it to flow through at a rate
        of around a milliliter a second."

        Temperatures (CW holds 92 - 94 Celsius to be ideal) that are too hot
        or too cool can cause over/under-extracted coffee too.

        Is that what you said?
        Tex


        In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, Paul Albert Acosta
        <paul_albert_acosta@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Here is the science behind the extraction process:
        >
        > The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee
        bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso its flavor and essence.
        The consequences of good oil extraction lead to finer taste and
        superior crema. The finer espresso grinds create a greater exterior
        surface area and exposes the bean to more steam (fluid) permeabilty
        into the bean. The group head educts air from its head space and the
        air trapped in the espresso grind compacted in the portafilter basket.
        >
        > The result of properly mettered saturated steam at the proper
        temperature is to facilitate the coffee (espresso) oil extraction.
        Resonance time of the extracting fluid (saturated steam) is key. It
        is better to have a moderate to slightly higher discharge temperature
        up to 204 deg F at the brew head which is mettered slowly (orifice,
        restriction, and compaction of grind) to maximize oil extration. The
        oil extracted along with air educted in the brew head and captured in
        the grind creates the formation of the creama by changing the cohesion
        tension of the fluid which allows and facilitates the formation of
        bubble (crema).
        >
        >
        > If the grind is not fine enough or volume of steam is too great
        channeling will occur (beans will not be exposed or permeated/
        penetrated). Channeling leads to less oil extracted.
        > Low brew headfluid discharge temperature leads to a soupy mess left
        in the portafilter basket and less oil extraction.
        >
        > Espresso Regards,
        >
        > Paul Albert Acosta
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Ray Brown
        That s all nice stuff to know. but does anyone know if Don got his power light to come on yet? From: BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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          That's all nice stuff to know. but does anyone know if Don got his power
          light to come on yet?





          From: BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Robert Harmon
          Sent: Wednesday, October 01, 2008 1:25 PM
          To: BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [BUG] Re: Oil Extraction



          Huh? I swear Paul, you must be related to Flasherly over on alt.coffee
          - I'm not sure that I've ever understood what you guys publish!

          What is extracted during a pull? Flavor compounds: some oil, yes; some
          gasses, yes. But there are also coffee solids extracted that contain
          flavor compounds. The gasses that make up crema are coated with oils -
          that's what holds the crema together.

          Pressure (CW holds ~9 bar to be ideal) is critical to extracting the
          *good* flavor compounds. Too long a pull results in over-extracted
          coffee, with compounds being extracted that diminish the tasted. Too
          short a pull results in under-extracted coffee, leaving the *good*
          flavor compound in the filter.

          As Illy noted in his article; ..."the hydraulic resistance of this bed
          of coffee grounds must be slightly less than the pressure of the
          steaming-hot extraction water, allowing it to flow through at a rate
          of around a milliliter a second."

          Temperatures (CW holds 92 - 94 Celsius to be ideal) that are too hot
          or too cool can cause over/under-extracted coffee too.

          Is that what you said?
          Tex

          In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com <mailto:BUG-is-Bunn%40yahoogroups.com> , Paul
          Albert Acosta
          <paul_albert_acosta@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Here is the science behind the extraction process:
          >
          > The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee
          bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso its flavor and essence.
          The consequences of good oil extraction lead to finer taste and
          superior crema. The finer espresso grinds create a greater exterior
          surface area and exposes the bean to more steam (fluid) permeabilty
          into the bean. The group head educts air from its head space and the
          air trapped in the espresso grind compacted in the portafilter basket.
          >
          > The result of properly mettered saturated steam at the proper
          temperature is to facilitate the coffee (espresso) oil extraction.
          Resonance time of the extracting fluid (saturated steam) is key. It
          is better to have a moderate to slightly higher discharge temperature
          up to 204 deg F at the brew head which is mettered slowly (orifice,
          restriction, and compaction of grind) to maximize oil extration. The
          oil extracted along with air educted in the brew head and captured in
          the grind creates the formation of the creama by changing the cohesion
          tension of the fluid which allows and facilitates the formation of
          bubble (crema).
          >
          >
          > If the grind is not fine enough or volume of steam is too great
          channeling will occur (beans will not be exposed or permeated/
          penetrated). Channeling leads to less oil extracted.
          > Low brew headfluid discharge temperature leads to a soupy mess left
          in the portafilter basket and less oil extraction.
          >
          > Espresso Regards,
          >
          > Paul Albert Acosta
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert Harmon
          Hey Ray; for $20, if all Don ends up with is a big door-stop, I figure he s still way ahead of the game. If I was trying to debug this problem I d start with
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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            Hey Ray; for $20, if all Don ends up with is a big door-stop, I figure
            he's still way ahead of the game.

            If I was trying to debug this problem I'd start with the line-in leads
            and work my way forward. Using a multimeter and a handful of jumpers,
            I'd have it figured out - more or less - in a week or so.

            {;-)
            Tex

            --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Ray Brown" <brown.ray.e@...> wrote:
            >
            > That's all nice stuff to know. but does anyone know if Don got his power
            > light to come on yet?
            >
            >
          • Craig Andrews
            Right, & Crema is a complex colloidal emulsified Co2 suspension of lipids/oils, fats. {;-) Cheers! Craig. ... alt.coffee ... some ... contain ... oils - ...
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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              Right, & Crema is a complex colloidal emulsified Co2 suspension of
              lipids/oils, fats. {;-)
              Cheers!
              Craig.

              --- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Harmon"
              <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:
              >
              > Huh? I swear Paul, you must be related to Flasherly over on
              alt.coffee
              > - I'm not sure that I've ever understood what you guys publish!
              >
              > What is extracted during a pull? Flavor compounds: some oil, yes;
              some
              > gasses, yes. But there are also coffee solids extracted that
              contain
              > flavor compounds. The gasses that make up crema are coated with
              oils -
              > that's what holds the crema together.
              >
              > Pressure (CW holds ~9 bar to be ideal) is critical to extracting
              the
              > *good* flavor compounds. Too long a pull results in over-extracted
              > coffee, with compounds being extracted that diminish the tasted.
              Too
              > short a pull results in under-extracted coffee, leaving the *good*
              > flavor compound in the filter.
              >
              > As Illy noted in his article; ..."the hydraulic resistance of this
              bed
              > of coffee grounds must be slightly less than the pressure of the
              > steaming-hot extraction water, allowing it to flow through at a
              rate
              > of around a milliliter a second."
              >
              > Temperatures (CW holds 92 - 94 Celsius to be ideal) that are too
              hot
              > or too cool can cause over/under-extracted coffee too.
              >
              > Is that what you said?
              > Tex
              >
              >
              > In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, Paul Albert Acosta
              > <paul_albert_acosta@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Here is the science behind the extraction process:
              > >
              > > The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee
              > bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso its flavor and
              essence.
              > The consequences of good oil extraction lead to finer taste and
              > superior crema. The finer espresso grinds create a greater
              exterior
              > surface area and exposes the bean to more steam (fluid) permeabilty
              > into the bean. The group head educts air from its head space and
              the
              > air trapped in the espresso grind compacted in the portafilter
              basket.
              > >
              > > The result of properly mettered saturated steam at the proper
              > temperature is to facilitate the coffee (espresso) oil extraction.
              > Resonance time of the extracting fluid (saturated steam) is key.
              It
              > is better to have a moderate to slightly higher discharge
              temperature
              > up to 204 deg F at the brew head which is mettered slowly (orifice,
              > restriction, and compaction of grind) to maximize oil extration.
              The
              > oil extracted along with air educted in the brew head and captured
              in
              > the grind creates the formation of the creama by changing the
              cohesion
              > tension of the fluid which allows and facilitates the formation of
              > bubble (crema).
              > >
              > >
              > > If the grind is not fine enough or volume of steam is too great
              > channeling will occur (beans will not be exposed or permeated/
              > penetrated). Channeling leads to less oil extracted.
              > > Low brew headfluid discharge temperature leads to a soupy mess
              left
              > in the portafilter basket and less oil extraction.
              > >
              > > Espresso Regards,
              > >
              > > Paul Albert Acosta
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • Paul Albert Acosta
              Espresso is an emulsification of the oil extracted and the water introduced just also add some educted air. Some small solids also get mixed into the brew to
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 1, 2008
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                Espresso is an emulsification of the oil extracted and the water introduced just also add some educted air. Some small solids also get mixed into the brew to give espresso it final consistency. Air is a mixture of O2, N2, CO2, etc.

                Coolbeans!

                Paul Albert Acosta


                To: BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.comFrom: scandrews@...: Wed, 1 Oct 2008 20:48:11 +0000Subject: [BUG] Re: Oil Extraction




                Right, & Crema is a complex colloidal emulsified Co2 suspension of lipids/oils, fats. {;-)Cheers!Craig.--- In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Harmon" <Texas_Coffee@...> wrote:>> Huh? I swear Paul, you must be related to Flasherly over on alt.coffee> - I'm not sure that I've ever understood what you guys publish!> > What is extracted during a pull? Flavor compounds: some oil, yes; some> gasses, yes. But there are also coffee solids extracted that contain> flavor compounds. The gasses that make up crema are coated with oils -> that's what holds the crema together.> > Pressure (CW holds ~9 bar to be ideal) is critical to extracting the> *good* flavor compounds. Too long a pull results in over-extracted> coffee, with compounds being extracted that diminish the tasted. Too> short a pull results in under-extracted coffee, leaving the *good*> flavor compound in the filter.> > As Illy noted in his article; ..."the hydraulic resistance of this bed> of coffee grounds must be slightly less than the pressure of the> steaming-hot extraction water, allowing it to flow through at a rate> of around a milliliter a second."> > Temperatures (CW holds 92 - 94 Celsius to be ideal) that are too hot> or too cool can cause over/under-extracted coffee too.> > Is that what you said?> Tex> > > In BUG-is-Bunn@yahoogroups.com, Paul Albert Acosta> <paul_albert_acosta@> wrote:> >> > > > Here is the science behind the extraction process:> > > > The true golden rule is actually oil extraction from the coffee> bean. The oil extraction gives the espresso its flavor and essence. > The consequences of good oil extraction lead to finer taste and> superior crema. The finer espresso grinds create a greater exterior> surface area and exposes the bean to more steam (fluid) permeabilty> into the bean. The group head educts air from its head space and the> air trapped in the espresso grind compacted in the portafilter basket.> > > > The result of properly mettered saturated steam at the proper> temperature is to facilitate the coffee (espresso) oil extraction. > Resonance time of the extracting fluid (saturated steam) is key. It> is better to have a moderate to slightly higher discharge temperature> up to 204 deg F at the brew head which is mettered slowly (orifice,> restriction, and compaction of grind) to maximize oil extration. The> oil extracted along with air educted in the brew head and captured in> the grind creates the formation of the creama by changing the cohesion> tension of the fluid which allows and facilitates the formation of> bubble (crema).> > > > > > If the grind is not fine enough or volume of steam is too great> channeling will occur (beans will not be exposed or permeated/> penetrated). Channeling leads to less oil extracted. > > Low brew headfluid discharge temperature leads to a soupy mess left> in the portafilter basket and less oil extraction. > > > > Espresso Regards,> > > > Paul Albert Acosta> > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]> >>






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