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RE: [BPQ32] DOS BPQ question

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  • John Wiseman
    Hi Charles, Apart from DOS, all you actually need is bpqcode.exe or switch.exe, bpqcfg.bin and bpqnodes. Normally if you were running bpqcode, you would want
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 7, 2007
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      Hi Charles,
       
      Apart from DOS, all you actually need is bpqcode.exe or switch.exe, bpqcfg.bin and bpqnodes. Normally if you were running bpqcode, you would want pac4.exe, so you could monitor what was happening. And you might want bpqnodes.exe to enable you to save the nodes table, or sysoph and a password file if you want to remotely manage the node.
       
      Switch.exe and pac4 write a single line to a log file, giving the time they started. Apart from that there is no disk activity once the code is loaded.
       
      Regards,
      John
       
      -----Original Message-----
      From: BPQ32@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BPQ32@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charles Brabham
      Sent: 07 March 2007 23:52
      To: BPQ32@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [BPQ32] DOS BPQ question


      Hello!

      I am wondering about the minimum files needed to operate DOS BPQ. - I
      am wanting to operate BPQ from a RAM Disk.

      Also: Any tricks or tips for reducing or eliminating disk activity
      would be very helpful. - If I could eliminate any disk writes during
      operation, then the RAM Disk would not be needed and that would
      simplify things.

      Alternately: Is there a way to operate DOS BPQ in one disk/directory
      and have it's disk activity occur on another disk, or just store the
      data in memory?

      73,
      Charles Brabham, N5PVL

    • Charles Brabham
      Thank you for the information, John! I am trying to run BPQ in an embedded PC that will be running with no monitor or keyboard, and boots up from a compact
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 7, 2007
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        Thank you for the information, John!

        I am trying to run BPQ in an embedded PC that will be running with no
        monitor or keyboard, and boots up from a compact flash memory card. (
        No moving or rotating parts )

        The CF cards only tolerate so many writes, so I'm trying to avoid
        that. The system is running under ROMDOS, a special DOS for embedded
        systems.

        PC104 form embedded computers are starting to appear on the
        surplus/salvage market now at reasonable prices. They handle
        vibration and temperature extremes well, have built-in watchdog timer
        setups, and my 1996 vintage 133Mhz PS is only 5.75" x 8". It has four
        RS-232 ports. - It will fit into the case from a dead MFJ 1270c.

        It cost me about 25 bucks with the shipping. - Plus odd and ends for
        development, connectors, a floppy drive to set it up with, etc...

        When I'm finished tweaking the software, I'll disconnect the floppy
        drive, keyboard and video - and will have a stand-alone 4-port BPQ
        switch with no moving or rotating parts.

        You can see the data sheet for the computer in a PDF file at:

        ftp://ftp.emacinc.com/m-5890.pdf

        I think that hams will have an easier time getting these smaller
        computers into tower shacks, and they will hold up better on the job.
        They are reliable enough to put BPQ into remote tower sites ( also
        baloons, aircraft, etc. ) with some confidence.

        Do a seach for "PC104", "embedded computer", "industrial
        computer", "touchscreen computer", or "tablet computer" at eBay to
        see these computers, some as small as 3.5" square by 1" thick!

        73,
        Charles Brabham, N5PVL

        --- In BPQ32@yahoogroups.com, "John Wiseman" <john.wiseman@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Charles,
        >
        > Apart from DOS, all you actually need is bpqcode.exe or switch.exe,
        > bpqcfg.bin and bpqnodes. Normally if you were running bpqcode, you
        would
        > want pac4.exe, so you could monitor what was happening. And you
        might want
        > bpqnodes.exe to enable you to save the nodes table, or sysoph and a
        password
        > file if you want to remotely manage the node.
        >
        > Switch.exe and pac4 write a single line to a log file, giving the
        time they
        > started. Apart from that there is no disk activity once the code is
        loaded.
        >
        > Regards,
        > John
      • John Wiseman
        Hi Charles, I d looked at PC104 boards a few years ago, but they were very expensive. If they are now becoming reasonable, that will be very intreresting.
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 8, 2007
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          Message
          Hi Charles,
           
          I'd looked at PC104 boards a few years ago, but they were very expensive. If they are now becoming reasonable, that will be very intreresting. There is a version of BPQ for the Kantronics Data Engine which was used for quite a few remote nodes, but I don't know if it is still made. It wasn't cheap, either!
           
          73,
          John
           
          -----Original Message-----
          From: BPQ32@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BPQ32@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charles Brabham
          Sent: 08 March 2007 03:57
          To: BPQ32@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [BPQ32] Re: DOS BPQ question

          Thank you for the information, John!

          I am trying to run BPQ in an embedded PC that will be running with no
          monitor or keyboard, and boots up from a compact flash memory card. (
          No moving or rotating parts )

          The CF cards only tolerate so many writes, so I'm trying to avoid
          that. The system is running under ROMDOS, a special DOS for embedded
          systems.

          PC104 form embedded computers are starting to appear on the
          surplus/salvage market now at reasonable prices. They handle
          vibration and temperature extremes well, have built-in watchdog timer
          setups, and my 1996 vintage 133Mhz PS is only 5.75" x 8". It has four
          RS-232 ports. - It will fit into the case from a dead MFJ 1270c.

          It cost me about 25 bucks with the shipping. - Plus odd and ends for
          development, connectors, a floppy drive to set it up with, etc...

          When I'm finished tweaking the software, I'll disconnect the floppy
          drive, keyboard and video - and will have a stand-alone 4-port BPQ
          switch with no moving or rotating parts.

          You can see the data sheet for the computer in a PDF file at:

          ftp://ftp.emacinc. com/m-5890. pdf

          I think that hams will have an easier time getting these smaller
          computers into tower shacks, and they will hold up better on the job.
          They are reliable enough to put BPQ into remote tower sites ( also
          baloons, aircraft, etc. ) with some confidence.

          Do a seach for "PC104", "embedded computer", "industrial
          computer", "touchscreen computer", or "tablet computer" at eBay to
          see these computers, some as small as 3.5" square by 1" thick!

          73,
          Charles Brabham, N5PVL

          --- In BPQ32@yahoogroups. com, "John Wiseman" <john.wiseman@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Charles,
          >
          > Apart from DOS, all you actually need is bpqcode.exe or switch.exe,
          > bpqcfg.bin and bpqnodes. Normally if you were running bpqcode, you
          would
          > want pac4.exe, so you could monitor what was happening. And you
          might want
          > bpqnodes.exe to enable you to save the nodes table, or sysoph and a
          password
          > file if you want to remotely manage the node.
          >
          > Switch.exe and pac4 write a single line to a log file, giving the
          time they
          > started. Apart from that there is no disk activity once the code is
          loaded.
          >
          > Regards,
          > John

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