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Re: [BCD396XT] Antenna Options for my BCD396XT

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  • Mark Mitchell
    UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUH what did you say $3000 for a lightning arrestor? Where are you at? I have found some for less than a $100 and some up to $500.. Mark ... --
    Message 1 of 39 , May 6, 2013
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      UUUUUUUUUUUUUUUH what did you say $3000 for a lightning arrestor? Where
      are you at? I have found some for less than a $100 and some up to $500..

      Mark




      On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 5:53 PM, Lance <milcom_chaser@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > You could use a 3ft. copper rod with rock salt mixed into the soil for
      > increased conductivity as your go to ground point.
      > Real lightning arrestors run around $3000. Ouch!
      >
      > It's all fun till someone looses a front end (RF that is...)
      >
      >
      > On May 6, 2013, at 3:58 PM, Mark Mitchell wrote:
      >
      > > Joe,
      > > Thanks for the input on a vertical I was thinking the same thing short of
      > > disconnecting it from mt radio and putting a charge to it and watching
      > them
      > > fall...LOL
      > > Mark
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 4:54 PM, Don.Curtis@... <Don.Curtis@...
      > >wrote:
      > >
      > >> **
      >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> The "yes to the mast" was an answer to your question about grounding the
      > >> mast rather than the antenna.
      > >>
      > >> Yes, even a mast that's on the ground (earth) has to have a separate
      > >> ground rod, unless you have buried the first 8' of the mast.
      > >>
      > >> Coax cable has a center conductor & a grounded shield. A coax lightning
      > >> arrestor is basically a spark gap between the center conductor & ground
      > >> rod. If the non-grounded portion of the antenna gets hit by lighting the
      > >> voltage will run down the coax, and jump the spark gap and go to ground.
      > >> Without the arrestor, it can go inside the home and cause lots of
      > damage to
      > >> your radio equip & home.
      > >>
      > >> The majority of the lightning will arc across the antenna, into the mast
      > >> and then down to the ground rod. But some WILL go down the coax, thus
      > you
      > >> need BOTH grounded properly.
      > >>
      > >> Remember, lightning takes the easiest electrical path to ground which
      > >> could be right thru your radio. That's why you need at least 8' of
      > ground
      > >> rod to make that the easiest electrical path to ground.
      > >>
      > >> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4GLTE smartphone
      > >>
      > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > Mark ~
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >



      --
      Mark ~


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Don.Curtis@att.net
      No, the antenna does not take a separate ground. The mast mounting clamp grounds the portion of the antenna that needs to be grounded. So the mast
      Message 39 of 39 , May 7, 2013
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        No, the antenna does not take a separate ground. The mast mounting clamp grounds the portion of the antenna that needs to be grounded. So the mast ground acts as the antenna ground also.

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4GLTE smartphone



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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