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Re: [BCD396XT] Antenna Options for my BCD396XT

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  • Ron Cluster
    Try this for putting in a ground rod.... Turn a garden hose on to just a trickle. Push the ground rod into the dirt, by hand, a few inches. Set the end of the
    Message 1 of 39 , May 5, 2013
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      Try this for putting in a ground rod....

      Turn a garden hose on to just a trickle.
      Push the ground rod into the dirt, by hand, a few inches.
      Set the end of the garden hose so it's putting water at the base of the ground rod.
      Now start raising and pushing the ground rod, slowly.
      You will find that with each push, it is going a little further into the ground.
      Just keep doing that until it's as deep as you want it.
      No hammers and ladders required.
      The water acts as a lubricant and also gets forced ahead of the tip of the ground rod, loosening the earth and "drilling" your hole as you go.

      I'd heard this years ago and thought "no way is that going to work", probably the same thing you're thinking right now. I put in 3 ten foot ground rods in 15 minutes using this method and ended up laughing my a$$ off. No way could it be that easy......but it is!

      Probably won't work in granite but we have hard clay soil over the top of big round river rock, impossible to dig with a shovel. The water method worked really well.

      Ron in Eugene


      On May 5, 2013, at 6:09 PM, MCH wrote:

      > No bit needed - you put the ground rod in where the bit would go.
      > That's why you need the large drill and not just the standard size.
      > Even though the ground rod is not cut to drill, it usually works.
      >
      > Joe M.
      >
      > Preston Ward wrote:
      >> A large drill was suggested, but that assumes I can get a really long drill bit,
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Don.Curtis@att.net
      No, the antenna does not take a separate ground. The mast mounting clamp grounds the portion of the antenna that needs to be grounded. So the mast
      Message 39 of 39 , May 7, 2013
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        No, the antenna does not take a separate ground. The mast mounting clamp grounds the portion of the antenna that needs to be grounded. So the mast ground acts as the antenna ground also.

        Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4GLTE smartphone



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