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Re: [BCD396XT] Re: Dstar

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  • David Klippel
    Technically you are correct D-STAR is open but the codec is not and requires a license to decode so in function it is essentially encrypted/scrambled . Yes,
    Message 1 of 17 , Jun 4, 2012
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      Technically you are correct D-STAR is open but the codec is not and
      requires a license to decode so in function it is essentially
      'encrypted/scrambled'. Yes, you can purchase a dongle but it is still
      using a license Codec that you paid for. You can't legally reverse
      engineer the Codec and listen or transmit. The cost benefit is a big
      part of the issue and with just one manufacture using it does not help.
      If there were more options and free/open Codec in use it would be much
      further along in growth and acceptance.

      I feel a similar thing is happening with HD Radio. There are plenty of
      broadcasters but unfortunately not many radios with it built in. The car
      radio is becoming common to have HD. If you want to listen to HD on the
      beach or park where a small portable radio would be used or even in a
      home stereo or A/V receiver your options are very limited.

      This could go on but as for the original scanning question they need a
      license for the Codec it is a small audience for them to add the cost.
      Though as a Ham it would great to be able to monitor the D-STAR activity
      and maybe become convinced it is worth the cost.

      On 6/4/2012 6:32 PM, MCH wrote:
      >
      > I think the big issue with its slow growth are the benefits vs cost
      > issues. Most people have analog equipment. Relatively few have D-STAR.
      > So, in an emergency it will be primarily analog that will be useful.
      >
      > Also, there is a difference between digital and encrypted. D-STAR is not
      > encrypted in any form, so it's legal per Part 97. You can purchase a
      > dongle and monitor the conversations.
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dean B. Dalrymple
      About a year and half ago the club I was part of (before moving to a different city) invited a rep from Icom to come in and talk about their radios with the
      Message 2 of 17 , Jun 5, 2012
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        About a year and half ago the club I was part of (before moving to a
        different city) invited a rep from Icom to come in and talk about
        their radios with the focus primarily on the D-Star radios. While the
        technology is impressive, I don't see it ever becoming wide spread in
        the hobby.

        As Joe has pointed out, in an emergency it will be primarily analog
        that is used. Where I live ARES is part of the county's emergency
        plan so our communications need to be easily and inexpensively
        monitored by numerous agencies from local emergency services to the
        Red Cross. Costs of D-Star radios would prevent that.

        Dean VA3DBD


        At 06:32 PM 6/4/2012, MCH wrote:
        >I think the big issue with its slow growth are the benefits vs cost
        >issues. Most people have analog equipment. Relatively few have D-STAR.
        >So, in an emergency it will be primarily analog that will be useful.
      • Alex
        PC board real estate is expensive, microcode space isn t. Given the component density already in the 396 I don t think it is quite so easy to cram one more
        Message 3 of 17 , Jun 5, 2012
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          PC board real estate is expensive, microcode space isn't. Given the component density already in the 396 I don't think it is quite so easy to cram one more chip in there. If Uniden really wanted D-STAR then they'd likely just license the codec algorithms and code that into the microprocessor just like all the other digital codecs that are currently processed.

          --- In BCD396XT@yahoogroups.com, "Tony Langdon, VK3JED" <vk3jed@...> wrote:
          >
          > At 07:06 AM 6/5/2012, you wrote:
          > >If DVSI ever releases the code for the AMBE codec used in the radios
          > >then any radio like the 396XT could do it in its firmware.
          >
          > All the manufacturers have to do is include the right chip in their
          > scanner to handle the AMBE audio (same as they do for IMBE that P25
          > uses). Probably be one that can do both formats, since both are DVSI
          > products. The test of the D-STAR spec is open, and can (and has!) be
          > implemented by third parties.
          >
          > 73 de VK3JED / VK3IRL
          > http://vkradio.com
          >
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