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repeater reverse

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  • pitboss1@yahoo.com
    Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What is the
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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      Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What is the benefit, thanks
      Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
    • Clark Rennie
      It s probablly meant for convential systems only. Clark
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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        It's probablly meant for convential systems only.

        Clark

        At 09:10 AM 12/14/2009, you wrote:

        >Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will
        >work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What
        >is the benefit, thanks
        >Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
      • Dewey
        Radio systems will use repeaters to increase range. Unlike simplex (radio to radio on the same frequency), or duplex (radio to base on a transmit frequency,
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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          Radio systems will use repeaters to increase range. Unlike simplex (radio
          to radio on the same frequency), or duplex (radio to base on a transmit
          frequency, but listen on a separate receive frequency) radios, radios
          operating on a repeater system transmit on a transmit frequency which is
          received by the repeater, and simultaneously rebroadcast by the repeater on
          the receive frequency to all of the radios which hear on the receive
          frequency. The purpose of this is that the repeater is normally of a higher
          power, and at an optimum (high) location (repeaters can also be linked for
          an even greater range). This is why some agencies have "direct" frequencies
          (channels) that only operate for a mile or a few, but can switch to the
          repeater channel, and can be heard countywide. A person operating a radio
          on a repeater system can transmit on a repeated frequency standing next to
          someone else with a radio on the same system, and will NOT be heard on any
          of the system's radios if the transmitting radio can't make the repeater.

          My opinion of the Uniden's repeater reverse is that it will enable the
          listener to quickly swap the transmit for the receive frequency should they
          happen upon a one sided conversation which may really be the transmit side
          of the radio that is being heard. The repeater reverse is more beneficial
          for convention radio systems over trunked radio systems because switching
          from the transmit or receive frequency of a trunked system is really not
          helpful without the benefit of the control channel. Finally, there are
          formulas for "normal" repeater operations... in the 450's through 470's,
          mobiles transmit 5 MHz higher than they receive, and in the 490's, mobiles
          operate 3 MHz higher than they receive. If the frequency that you are
          monitoring is part of a repeater system, but the system does not follow the
          "normal" formula, you will not be switched to the proper frequency.

          In the 800's the repeater offsets are 45 Mhz, and I think 15 MHz is in there
          somewhere.

          Dewey

          -----Original Message-----
          From: BCD396XT@yahoogroups.com [mailto:BCD396XT@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of pitboss1@...
          Sent: Monday, December 14, 2009 12:11
          To: bcd396xt@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [BCD396XT] repeater reverse

          Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will
          work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What
          is the benefit, thanks
          Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • MCH
          It s a way to monitor the frequency the mobiles/portables/control stations are transmitting on for a repeater. It s one of those functions that most people
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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            It's a way to monitor the frequency the mobiles/portables/control
            stations are transmitting on for a repeater. It's one of those functions
            that most people would never use, but some like to see if a unit is
            close to their area, and on a repeater checking the input (reverse) is
            the only way to do that.

            I don't think it works with trunked systems, but it technically could.

            Joe M.

            pitboss1@... wrote:
            > Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What is the benefit, thanks
            > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
            > No virus found in this incoming message.
            > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            > Version: 9.0.716 / Virus Database: 270.14.107/2564 - Release Date: 12/14/09 02:37:00
            >
          • MCH
            It s a way to monitor the frequency the mobiles/portables/control stations are transmitting on for a repeater. It s one of those functions that most people
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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              It's a way to monitor the frequency the mobiles/portables/control
              stations are transmitting on for a repeater. It's one of those functions
              that most people would never use, but some like to see if a unit is
              close to their area, and on a repeater checking the input (reverse) is
              the only way to do that.

              I don't think it works with trunked systems, but it technically could.

              Joe M.

              pitboss1@... wrote:
              > Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What is the benefit, thanks
              > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >
              >
              > No virus found in this incoming message.
              > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              > Version: 9.0.716 / Virus Database: 270.14.107/2564 - Release Date: 12/14/09 02:37:00
              >
            • pitboss1@yahoo.com
              Thankyou..so it would work better with conventional.... Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry ... From: MCH Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 13:22:11 To:
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 14, 2009
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                Thankyou..so it would work better with conventional....
                Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                -----Original Message-----
                From: MCH <mch@...>
                Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 13:22:11
                To: <BCD396XT@yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: Re: [BCD396XT] repeater reverse

                It's a way to monitor the frequency the mobiles/portables/control
                stations are transmitting on for a repeater. It's one of those functions
                that most people would never use, but some like to see if a unit is
                close to their area, and on a repeater checking the input (reverse) is
                the only way to do that.

                I don't think it works with trunked systems, but it technically could.

                Joe M.

                pitboss1@... wrote:
                > Can someone explain in laymans terms.. The repeater reverse.. If it will work with any of my trunked systems or not, mainly type2 motorolas.. What is the benefit, thanks
                > Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                >
                >
                > No virus found in this incoming message.
                > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                > Version: 9.0.716 / Virus Database: 270.14.107/2564 - Release Date: 12/14/09 02:37:00
                >



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