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Singleton flying foxes safe for now

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  • Cynthia Myers
    but the locals wanted them killed. http://singleton.yourguide.com.au/news/local/general/thumbs-down-to-bat- cull/1174042.html or try this tinyurl version of
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 2, 2008
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      but the locals wanted them killed.

      http://singleton.yourguide.com.au/news/local/general/thumbs-down-to-bat-
      cull/1174042.html
      or try this tinyurl version of the link: http://tinyurl.com/2ws3vb

      Cindy Myers
      Fallbrook CA
      www.BatWorld.org
      home.earthlink.net/~cmsquare
       
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      Friday, 1 February 2008
      Print  | Close
      Thumbs down to bat cull
      By Peter Reynolds

      THE fight to cull the bats in Burdekin Park appears lost after Singleton
      Council’s application for a licence was refused. The Federal
      Government’s Department of the Environment made the decision, ruling the
      proposal was unacceptable under the Environmental Protection and
      Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999.

      In a letter to Singleton Council, the Department’s assistant secretary
      of the Environmental Assessment Branch, Cathy Skippington, said that the
      proposed action will have an unacceptable impact on a listed threatened
      species. “The EPBC Administrative Guidelines on significance for the
      Grey Headed Flying Fox allow for culling only in commercial fruit crops
      during the fruiting season, and only under permit,” Ms Skippington said.
      The culling of flying foxes for purposes other than the controlling of
      predation in fruit orchards contravenes the agreement made between the
      Australian Government and New South Wales in 2002.” Ms Skippington also
      said that if approved the action would lead to “a long term decrease in
      the size of an important population of a species, disrupt the breeding
      cycle of an important population, and interfere substantially with
      recovery of the species.”

      According to Singleton Council’s director of operations, Gary Woodman,
      the decision to refuse the application was expected. “The advice that
      was coming from both the State and Commonwealth Government’s during the
      submission of our application was not as positive as we had hoped,” he
      said. “We will now look closely at the relevant legislation to see if we
      can appeal or whether that would be a waste of time.”

      Singleton Council continue to anxiously await the report from zoologist
      Dr John Nelson on his opinions on relocating the bats from the park.
      “We’ll be looking to analyse Dr Nelson’s report as soon as we get it and
      present options to councillors,” Mr Woodman said. “Hopefully we will get
      the report soon as if we are going to do anything, we would like to do
      it by the end of March, before Anzac Day.”

      If the results of The Singleton Argus’ bat poll are any indication, the
      decision to refuse council’s application will disappoint the vast
      majority of the Singleton community. The Argus received a huge response
      to the poll, which gives a truly local opinion on the issue of culling
      the bats. A total of 175 votes were received to the question “are you in
      favour of culling the bats in Burdekin Park?” One hundred and sixty
      seven votes were cast for yes, while just eight votes were cast for no.
      That equates to 95.4 per cent for the cull and 4.6 per cent opposed.

      However the online poll had an opposite result. The national opinion is
      81.7 per cent opposed to the cull, 18.1 per cent in favour and 0.2 per
      cent undecided, with a total of 580 votes cast.


      Copyright © 2008. Rural Press Limited
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