Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Menlo Park, Atherton councils urge no on Prop. 1A HSR bond

Expand Messages
  • 10/1 Menlo Park Almanac
    Published Wednesday, October 1, 2008, by the Menlo Park Almanac MP, Atherton councils urge residents to oppose Prop 1-A, the high- speed rail measure By Rory
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 2, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Published Wednesday, October 1, 2008, by the Menlo Park Almanac

      MP, Atherton councils urge residents to oppose Prop 1-A, the high-
      speed rail measure

      By Rory Brown

      Just vote no. That's the message from Menlo Park and Atherton city
      council members regarding Proposition 1A, the high-speed rail bond
      measure on the Nov. 4 ballot.

      In separate meetings, the councils passed resolutions opposed to
      the $9.95 billion bond measure, which would provide the first stage
      of funding to build a high-speed passenger train to connect San
      Francisco and Los Angeles.

      Under the current plan, high-speed trains would use the Caltrain
      corridor to shoot up and down the Peninsula -- a route both councils
      strongly oppose due to potential impacts on homes and businesses
      located near the train tracks.

      The Atherton council voted 4-0 to oppose Proposition 1A, following
      a Sept. 24 high-speed rail study session.

      The Menlo Park council voted 3-1, with John Boyle opposed, at its
      Sept. 23 meeting, to oppose the bond measure.

      The mayors of both towns -- Jim Janz of Atherton and Andy Cohen of
      Menlo Park -- did not vote because they live within 500 feet of the
      Caltrain tracks.

      "I oppose [Proposition 1A] because of the impacts to Menlo Park,"
      said Menlo Park Councilman Richard Cline. He noted the potential
      construction, aesthetic, and property-value impacts of running the
      estimated $45 billion train through the Caltrain corridor. That
      helped make his opposition the "easiest decision" he's made as a
      council member, he said.

      "I suspect that high-speed rail, as presently planned ... has a
      very high probability of being a financial disaster," said Atherton
      Councilman Jim Dobbie. He questioned the budget and ridership
      projections of the high-speed rail system — concerns echoed by
      several residents at the Sept. 24 study session. "I can see no reason
      why I would ever consider voting for the high-speed rail project,"
      Mr. Dobbie said.

      But Menlo Park Councilman John Boyle, the lone councilman in the
      two cities not opposed to the bond measure, said the opposition to
      the project is "shortsighted."

      "I think we're missing the big picture," Mr. Boyle said, pointing
      to the potential environmental benefits and congestion relief that
      high-speed rail could provide statewide. He noted that Menlo Park,
      Atherton and other cities along the proposed route would have a
      chance to weigh in on the specifics of the plan if and when the bond
      measure passes.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.