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Mayor Newsom touts $18k per bus diesel exhaust filter retrofit

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  • 9/27 California Chronicle
    Pulished Wednesday, September 27, 2006, by California Chronicle RETROFITTING FOR REGIONAL TRANSIT VEHICLES California Political Desk Mayor touts Clean Diesel
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 28, 2006
      Pulished Wednesday, September 27, 2006, by California Chronicle

      RETROFITTING FOR REGIONAL TRANSIT VEHICLES

      California Political Desk

      Mayor touts Clean Diesel Bus Program as important step toward
      reducing effects of global warming San Francisco Muni leads the
      way by retrofitting 424 diesel buses -- the most of any transit
      district.

      San Francisco, CA -- Mayor Newsom was joined on Treasure Island
      yesterday by representatives of the Metropolitan Transportation
      Commission, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and the
      area's transit systems (including Muni, AC Transit, Golden Gate
      Bridge District, VTA, SamTrans, and County Connection) to announce
      an unprecedented diesel cleanup program for the area's transit
      providers.

      More than 1,700 diesel buses from 13 Bay Area transit districts are
      being retrofitted with diesel exhaust purifiers. Combined, these
      high-tech emission control filters annually capture more than 50
      tons of harmful particulate matter and 436 tons of oxides of
      nitrogen (NOx) that buses otherwise would have spewed into Bay Area
      air.

      San Francisco Muni leads the way by retrofitting 424 diesel buses --
      the most of any transit district.

      This is an important and unique advancement because Diesel
      particulate matter is a toxic air contaminant that can cause lung
      disease and cancer. NOx, another component of diesel exhaust, is a
      precursor to ozone, which can cause respiratory disease. Children
      and the elderly are particularly vulnerable.

      "We're learning more and more about what causes global warming and
      what we need to do to be more "proactive" in eliminating these
      harmful elements and gases from our air and environment," said Mayor
      Newsom. "This program serves as yet another example of San Francisco
      and the Bay Area leading the way with its unprecedented investments
      in clean air, renewable energy, creating a comprehensive Climate
      Action Plan, and the continued promotion of recycling and
      conservation," continued the Mayor.

      The diesel exhaust purifiers are designed and installed by Cleaire
      Advanced Emission Controls of San Leandro -- a local firm leading
      the way for California and the nation in cleaning up dangerous
      diesel exhaust.

      The purifiers capture 85 percent of the particulate matter –-
      including the dangerous ultrafine particulates that cause the worst
      health problems -- and reduce 25 percent of the NOx created by the
      buses' engines.

      On an average Bay Area bus, each diesel exhaust purifier reduces
      particulate matter emissions by 60 pounds per year and reduces NOx
      emissions by 517 pounds per year.

      About 60% of diesel particulate matter is Black Carbon, which is
      a contributor to global warming. Also, the hydrocarbons in diesel
      exhaust contribute to global warming. The filters installed on the
      buses in the Clean Diesel Bus Program reduce hydrocarbon emissions
      by 88 tons a year.

      This unique program is also considered a financially sound approach
      to combating global warming and reducing harmful emission. Diesel
      emissions can be cleaned up in two ways: replace the vehicle or
      retrofit the exhaust. Although some clean new buses have been
      purchased, however Muni's workhorse diesel buses typically last 20
      years or longer, so it is a wiser use of scarce public dollars to
      install filters on buses with years of life remaining rather than
      scrap the entire bus.

      Each filter installation costs about $18,000, compared to $140,000
      or more for a new bus. By upgrading 424 buses instead of replacing
      them, Muni saved $50 million and is delivering the environmental and
      health benefits of clean emissions.
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