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Hayward planners produce video simulation of development

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  • 8/23 Hayward Daily Review
    Published Tuesday, August 23, 2005, in the Hayward Daily Review Video simulates Hayward s growth plan City s Web site offers conceptual scenario for
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 23, 2005
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      Published Tuesday, August 23, 2005, in the Hayward Daily Review

      Video simulates Hayward's growth plan
      City's Web site offers "conceptual scenario" for redevelopment

      By Matt O'Brien

      In an effort to yield more community input from residents,
      city officials have posted an online video simulation of Hayward's
      next big redevelopment project.

      The six-minute video, posted on the main page of the city's Web site
      Monday morning, shows five-story buildings lining Mission Boulevard in
      South Hayward, tree-lined medians all along the Mission Boulevard
      corridor and transit-oriented homes surrounding the South Hayward BART
      station.

      "Video is a good way to show people what, conceptually, could happen,"
      said David Rizk, a senior city planner. "This doesn't mean this is
      what's going to be built. It's a conceptual scenario."

      The new feature marks the first time the city has posted a video
      simulation on its Web site.

      Bay Area developers are increasingly using video simulations as an
      alternative to traditional one-dimensional maps and still-life
      renderings, which can leave a lay observer -- including elected city
      officials -- without a real sense of what a project will look like
      when completed.

      City Manager Jesus Armas said the six-minute video was first unveiled
      to about 75 to 100 residents who attended a meeting on the Mission
      Boulevard redevelopment district earlier this summer.

      The redevelopment district comprises 240 acres of vacant or
      "underutilized" land surrounding the South Hayward BART station and
      along Mission Boulevard between Harder Road and Industrial Parkway.

      Approved in 2001, it is the most recently established redevelopment
      district in Hayward. The city's redevelopment authority enacted its
      first redevelopment district, comprising the downtown area, in 1975.
      The second district, comprising the area surrounding the old
      Hunt-Wesson Cannery, was approved in 1998.

      City Councilman Bill Quirk said the decisions the city must make
      regarding the Mission Boulevard redevelopment district couldn't be
      more important.

      The video simulations on the city's Web site show a Mission Boulevard
      that appears dramatically different from today's corridor of one-story
      strip centers.

      Five-story residential complexes line the boulevard, and the city is
      looking at anywhere between 700 and nearly 3,000 new homes. A
      community center is envisionedon Mission Boulevard near Valle Vista
      Avenue. The parcel now containing the soon-to-be-closed Holiday Bowl
      is home to large structures that might include a conference center.

      The video shows two design plans, one suburban and one urban, although
      Rizk said the final plan will be something in between. Quirk said
      most people have responded positively to the idea of significant
      improvements along Mission Boulevard, but many issues still need
      examining.

      "It's one thing to get pretty good response to a theoretical plan,"
      Quirk said. "It's another thing to get response to the details."

      The video simulation is available at
      <http://www.ci.hayward.ca.us/forums/SHBART/shbartforum.shtm>.
      The main page of the city's Web site is <http://www.ci.hayward.ca.us>


      [BATN: The video is oh-so-conveniently playable only by systems
      running the insecure, virus-prone, subfunctional and standards
      non-compliant Micro$oft Explorer browser, and it made available only
      in a Micro$oft-proprietary video format. This all rather defeats the
      point of open government information, doesn't it?

      "Your current Web browser cannot display this presentation. Microsoft
      Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher must be installed to watch this
      presentation.<br>Click OK to go to a Web page to download the lastest
      version of Microsoft Internet Explorer.<br>Click Cancel to go to a
      blank Web page and stop the current presentation."]
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