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Britain's Bayeux Embroidery

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  • Folo Watkins
    In 1885, Elizabeth Wardle--a friend of the noted medievalists William Morris--saw the original Bayeux Embroidery and decided that Britain did a copy. Enlisting
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 29, 2010
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      In 1885, Elizabeth Wardle--a friend of the noted medievalists William
      Morris--saw the original Bayeux Embroidery and decided that Britain
      did a copy. Enlisting the aid of someone who could dye the yarn to
      proper tones and an army of embroiderers, she did just that, creating
      an accurate embroidered copy of the Embroidery. It was widely shown,
      but ran out of funds for the tour in Reading. Reading bought it for
      300 pounds. In the late 1990s, it was cleaned and put on exhibition
      at the Reading Museum. It is, quite frankly, astounding and even more
      so when you realize how little known it is!

      I knew of the copy but had thought it further inland, but pals in
      Reading let me know it was here and asked if I wanted to see it. As
      you might imagine, I jumped at the chance! They allow cameras in the
      museum, so you can well imagine that I took advantage of it. My only
      regret is that I didn't photograph every panel, but a pamphlet I
      bought at the museum had a photo of the whole thing.

      The yarns were dyed with the same pigments probably used in the
      original, so the colors of the piece are probably close to what those
      of the original had been. The method of embroidery was the same as
      that used on the original, and Miss Julie spent a lot of time with
      her head against the glass, gazing on the actual stitches. We have
      uploaded some of the photos at:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/folo/sets/72157625141252457/

      Cheers, Folo
    • Eleanor Hurckes
      Dear Folo I enjoyed the pictures of the embroidery. SO beautifully done and detailed.  And I oddly see to recall this from some where.... and the it hit me
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 29, 2010
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        Dear Folo
        I enjoyed the pictures of the embroidery. SO beautifully done and detailed.  And I oddly see to recall this from some where.... and the it hit me like and apple from a tree right in me noggin!!! I have a copy of it the whole thing in my Virtual Fighting Arena that I bought in a place called Second LIfe.  As I reacall its identical.  But I have to confess, your pictures tho limited, do itmore justice then my computers graphic card does in a virtual world. Thank you so much for kindly sharing this. Again I enjoyed its splendor thru your eyes.
        KnightsRose


        From: Folo Watkins <folo1@...>
        To: Micel_Folcland@yahoogroups.com; Wurmwald@yahoogroups.com; Ayreton@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, October 29, 2010 9:35:24 PM
        Subject: [Ayreton] Britain's Bayeux Embroidery

         

        In 1885, Elizabeth Wardle--a friend of the noted medievalists William
        Morris--saw the original Bayeux Embroidery and decided that Britain
        did a copy. Enlisting the aid of someone who could dye the yarn to
        proper tones and an army of embroiderers, she did just that, creating
        an accurate embroidered copy of the Embroidery. It was widely shown,
        but ran out of funds for the tour in Reading. Reading bought it for
        300 pounds. In the late 1990s, it was cleaned and put on exhibition
        at the Reading Museum. It is, quite frankly, astounding and even more
        so when you realize how little known it is!

        I knew of the copy but had thought it further inland, but pals in
        Reading let me know it was here and asked if I wanted to see it. As
        you might imagine, I jumped at the chance! They allow cameras in the
        museum, so you can well imagine that I took advantage of it. My only
        regret is that I didn't photograph every panel, but a pamphlet I
        bought at the museum had a photo of the whole thing.

        The yarns were dyed with the same pigments probably used in the
        original, so the colors of the piece are probably close to what those
        of the original had been. The method of embroidery was the same as
        that used on the original, and Miss Julie spent a lot of time with
        her head against the glass, gazing on the actual stitches. We have
        uploaded some of the photos at:
        http://www.flickr.com/photos/folo/sets/72157625141252457/

        Cheers, Folo


      • Folo Watkins
        ... Seeing it was such a pleasure that I had to share it! And I was just so happy that I spent the money for a new camera which did a better job than any
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 29, 2010
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          >I enjoyed the pictures of the embroidery. SO beautifully done and
          >detailed. And I oddly see to recall this from some where.... and
          >the it hit me like and apple from a tree right in me noggin!!! I
          >have a copy of it the whole thing in my Virtual Fighting Arena that
          >I bought in a place called Second LIfe. As I reacall its
          >identical. But I have to confess, your pictures tho limited, do
          >itmore justice then my computers graphic card does in a virtual
          >world. Thank you so much for kindly sharing this. Again I enjoyed
          >its splendor thru your eyes.

          Seeing it was such a pleasure that I had to share it! And I was just
          so happy that I spent the money for a new camera which did a better
          job than any older one ever did!

          Thanks for the thanks (Depart of Redundancy Department...)

          Cheers, Folo
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