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Fwd: ARI News for November

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  • Charlie Beel
    good things happening :) Gig em, Charlie ... _________________________________________________________________ Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 9, 2001
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      good things happening :)

      Gig'em,
      Charlie



      >From: "The Ayn Rand Institute" <list.administrator@...>
      >Reply-To: <stewartm@...>
      >To: <rebelionel@...>
      >Subject: ARI News for November
      >Date: Fri, 9 Nov 2001 11:03:00 -0800
      >
      >Dear rebelionel@...,
      >
      >The semester is starting to wind down and it has been a busy one. ARI has
      >sponsored or co-sponsored a record number of live events, including
      >nineteen
      >talks on the September 11th terrorist attacks. Many of these talks, often
      >in conjunction with full-page ads featuring Dr. Leonard Peikoff's article
      >"End States Who Sponsor Terrorism," have had a substantial impact on
      >campus.
      >As the anti-war student groups begin to organize and become more vocal, it
      >is more important than ever to speak out in favor of America's right to
      >defend itself. Even if there's not a campus club at your school or in your
      >area, you can make a difference by voicing your opinion and by writing to
      >your school or local newspaper.
      >
      >Hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.
      >
      >Sincerely,
      >
      >Stewart Margolis
      >Campus Club Advisor
      >.......................................
      >
      >CONTENTS
      >----
      >-ARI AD CAUSING STIR ON CAMPUS
      >-CAMPUS TALK AT BERKELEY
      >-NOTE FROM DR. PEIKOFF
      >-INCREASE IN VISITORS TO ARI'S WEB SITE
      >-IN THE MEDIA
      >-INTRODUCING STUDENTS TO AYN RAND'S NOVELS
      >-ANDREW LEWIS RADIO SHOW - UPDATE
      >-Q&A WITH CARL BARNEY
      >-SHOP ONLINE, BENEFIT ARI
      >-UPCOMING LIVE EVENTS
      >
      >----
      >ARI Ad Causing Stir on Campus
      >----
      >On October 25, the San Francisco Chronicle reported:
      >"The campus paper at the University of California at Berkeley was stolen
      >from news racks yesterday in protest of an ad calling for the United States
      >to combat terrorism by overthrowing the government of Iran. [The thieves]
      >left an unsigned flyer accusing the Daily Californian of publishing 'racist
      >hate speech' in an ad by Leonard Peikoff, founder of the Ayn Rand
      >Institute."
      >
      >For its part, the Daily Californian featured the story on its front page.
      >After excerpting from Dr. Peikoff's article, and quoting Dr. Yaron Brook,
      >the story noted that in reaction to the thefts, "other fliers appeared in
      >the newspaper boxes. . . . They reprinted the First Amendment, with the
      >phrase 'freedom of speech, or of the press' highlighted. . . . Other fliers
      >printed a quote attributed to Thomas Jefferson, saying 'Our liberty depends
      >on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being
      >lost.'"
      >
      >In an ARI press release, Dr. Brook said, "The thefts betray a contempt for
      >private property - the principle that makes free speech possible. They are
      >supporting the aims of the terrorists who have sought to annihilate the
      >principles on which America was founded."
      >
      >The story reached the national media. The Wall Street Journal online
      >edition
      >reported the story, under the title "Stealing Free Speech," with a link to
      >the full text of Dr. Peikoff's article.
      >
      >----
      >Campus Talk at Berkeley
      >----
      >Though anti-America protestors tried to subvert the right to free speech at
      >Berkeley, they were unsuccessful. Dr. Peikoff's article in the campus
      >newspaper coincided with an ARI campus talk by Dr. Gary Hull, which went
      >ahead as planned. Titled "Twin Towers Destroyed by the Ivory Tower," the
      >talk showed that terrorism's ideology of hatred for reason, for happiness
      >on
      >earth, and for wealth is the very philosophy being taught in our
      >universities. Before it began, campus police warned those protestors who
      >came that no outbursts would be tolerated. After the talk, which was
      >without
      >incident, members of the Berkeley Objectivist campus club distributed
      >flyers
      >featuring Dr. Peikoff's article.
      >
      >----
      >Note from Dr. Peikoff
      >----
      >I was the only signer of ARI's articles on terrorism in the Washington Post
      >and The New York Times, but I had a lot of help, which I want to
      >acknowledge. John Allison was my primary inspiration and unfailing
      >morale-booster; he suggested the ads in the first place, and then, with
      >another donor, financed them. Steve Jolivette did hours of historical
      >research, Richard Ralston contributed specialized knowledge of the Mideast,
      >Yaron Brook made important structural improvements in the articles and
      >himself (at midnight) wrote the first draft of the section on Bush's flawed
      >policies. At the end, both Yaron and my wife, Amy - in marathon
      >line-editing sessions with me - went through my final drafts methodically,
      >one paragraph at a time, identifying possible sources of unclarity,
      >eliminating needless words, offering better alternatives. Some of their
      >editing I would have done myself, but only after I could look at the piece
      >with fresh eyes, days later - and we couldn't wait days. To all these
      >individuals, and especially to John, Yaron, and Amy, thank you for helping
      >me from the start and carrying through to the end.
      >
      >LEONARD PEIKOFF
      >
      >----
      >Increase in Visitors to ARI's Web Site
      >----
      >During September, the Institute's Web site - and the America at War section
      >in particular - attracted a record number of visitors: nearly
      >100,000-double
      >the number from August. The articles by Dr. Leonard Peikoff which appeared
      >as ads in The New York Times and The Washington Post were downloaded more
      >than 35,000 times (so far). All told, the site received 4.2 million page
      >requests.
      >
      >The Web site is being updated continually with op-eds and essays on the
      >war.
      >Most recently, we added an electronic version of the special issue of
      >Impact
      >(which was mailed to all donors), the article "Religion vs. America" by Dr.
      >Leonard Peikoff and the transcript of "America vs. Death-Worship: The Moral
      >Meaning of the Coming War," a talk by Dr. Harry Binswanger. Visit:
      >www.aynrand.org.
      >
      >----
      >In the Media
      >----
      >Following his first appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor," Dr. Leonard
      >Peikoff
      >was invited back to be a guest on the show. On Oct. 12 he was interviewed
      >by
      >the John Kasich, who was filling in for Bill O'Reilly. ARI continues to
      >receive letters and e-mails in reaction to Dr. Peikoff's appearance on the
      >show, as well as his two newspaper editorials.
      >
      >*Attention From Unexpected Quarters*
      >Dr. Peikoff's television appearances have attracted the attention not only
      >of the American public, but also of commentators in unexpected quarters. A
      >recent column in The New Republic - a conservative magazine long scornful
      >of
      >Ayn Rand and of Objectivism - reported approvingly on Dr. Peikoff's
      >appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor." Perhaps just as unexpected was the
      >publication of an ARI op-ed, titled "Terrorists vs. America," in the Jordan
      >Times of Amman, Jordan. The article, written by Dr. Michael Berliner,
      >identifies the virtues for which Islamic terrorists hate America. The
      >Jordan
      >Times reprinted the article with only one omission. The following sentence
      >was cut: "The terrorists must destroy anything that interferes with the
      >dictates of Allah or the desires of Mother Earth." To read this op-ed, as
      >well as more than a hundred others, visit ARI's Web site:
      >www.aynrand.org/medialink.
      >
      >*Wartime Intellectual Activism*
      >We continue to hear about dozens of ARI supporters whose letters to the
      >editor have been published. At the last count, Glenn Woiceshyn has had 20
      >letters in major newspapers around the world. (Mr. Woiceshyn has written
      >op-eds for ARI.) We've received word that on October 13, both Chip Joyce
      >and
      >Michael Gold had letters in The New York Times.
      >
      >----
      >Introducing Students to Ayn Rand's Novels
      >----
      >Last month ARI's "Fountainhead" and "Anthem" essay contests began accepting
      >submissions. To publicize the contests, we have mailed flyers, which list
      >the essay questions and contest rules, to about 265,000 educators. Our
      >mailing targeted high school teachers, librarians, and guidance counselors
      >throughout the United States. Thanks to a $20,000 grant earmarked to help
      >promote the contests, we were able to expand the mailing to include 7,000
      >educators in Canada and at American schools abroad, whom we could not
      >afford
      >to contact last year. The grant has also enabled us to place numerous
      >advertisements in teachers' magazines and other education periodicals.
      >Each year the essay contests introduce thousands of high school students to
      >Ayn Rand's novels. "The Fountainhead" contest (now in its 17th year) and
      >the
      >"Anthem" contest (in its 10th year) together have attracted more than
      >85,000
      >submissions.
      >
      >"The impact of the contests is much wider," said Marilee Dahl, who manages
      >the project. "We know that every year there are students who read the
      >novels, because teachers assigned the books in class, but who do not enter
      >the contests. Word of mouth also is a factor. We know that many students
      >hear about the books from others who do enter the contests. So the number
      >of
      >students who learn about the books as a result of the contests is probably
      >higher than the number of entries."
      >
      >To encourage the teaching of Miss Rand's books, ARI offers educators free
      >classroom materials such as lesson plans and guides to the novels. The
      >deadline for entering the "Anthem" contest is March 18, 2002; "The
      >Fountainhead," April 15, 2002. To download a copy of this year's flyer, or
      >to learn more about the contests, visit: www.aynrand.org/contests/.
      >
      >*NOTE: A separate announcement will be going out shortly regarding the
      >"Atlas Shrugged" essay contest for college students.
      >
      >----
      >Andrew Lewis Radio Show: Update
      >----
      >The Andrew Lewis Radio Show is on air at a new time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
      >(Pacific) on Sundays. Since becoming a project of ARI, the show has added a
      >new radio station to its list of affiliates.
      >
      >KCAA 1050 AM, in Yorba Linda, CA, is scheduled to start carrying the show
      >in
      >December. The station covers a sizeable portion of Southern
      >California--from
      >southeast Los Angeles, to Palm Springs in the west, to parts of San Diego
      >county. It has an estimated (potential) audience of 3.2 million listeners.
      >
      >Recent guests on the show have included: Dr. Leonard Peikoff, Dr. Yaron
      >Brook and Peter Schwartz. To listen to archived programs on the Internet,
      >visit: www.alshow.com. To receive e-mail updates on upcoming show topics,
      >send your request to: comment@....
      >
      >----
      >Q&A with Carl Barney
      >----
      >A founding contributor and an active supporter of ARI, Mr. Carl Barney
      >joined the Institute's board of directors in 1999. Among other business
      >activities, Mr. Barney owns and manages several private colleges in
      >Colorado
      >and Utah. Impact spoke to him about his business career and the influence
      >that Ayn Rand's ideas have had on his life. The concluding part of this
      >interview will appear next month.
      >
      >IMPACT: When and where did you first encounter Ayn Rand's ideas?
      >
      >Carl Barney: I was born and went to school in England, but left when I was
      >18 to travel the world. If I could have articulated what I was looking for
      >at that time, it was a comprehensive view, a philosophy of life. Over a
      >span
      >of about eight months, I traveled through Europe and Asia, and ended up in
      >Australia, which was my goal. It was fascinating, and I had lots of great
      >adventures, but I didn't find a philosophy. It was many years later before
      >I
      >actually found the philosophy I was looking for. In the early 80s, about
      >twenty years later, when I was living in the U.S. I met a woman in a
      >business context who said some startling things, such as "This is your
      >private property. We have a contract, and I'll honor that contract. I don't
      >want anything from you which isn't earned or deserved." Wow, this is
      >different! I thought. [laughs] Surprised to hear her say such things, I
      >told
      >her that I was intrigued. She said, "You need to read 'Atlas Shrugged.'"
      >
      >IMPACT: What was the immediate impact? How did it shape the course of your
      >life?
      >
      >CB: Well, in the early 80's I was looking for a career-what to do with the
      >second half of my life-and I had read "Atlas Shrugged," and had taken some
      >of Dr. Leonard Peikoff's courses. I set myself the task of finding
      >something
      >which I really loved to do and which I was willing to spend the rest of my
      >life doing. I read Miss Rand's article "The Objectivist Ethics," in "The
      >Virtue of Selfishness," and I found what I was looking for in terms of a
      >method, i.e., a means of identifying values in many areas of life, and of
      >how to arrange them in a hierarchy.
      >
      >By following the process, explicit and implicit, in "The Objectivist
      >Ethics," I identified a career purpose, which was to own and manage private
      >colleges. Having gone through that rational process thoroughly, looked at
      >my
      >values, written them down, integrated them, I found that I gained an
      >understanding, a certainty. Not only concerning what I was doing, but why I
      >was doing it. It gave me a great deal of clarity and motivation. In a
      >sense,
      >the purpose almost had a life of its own: I was strongly motivated.
      >
      >
      >After I did that, I immediately went out and did a search for a private
      >college to acquire. I found one, acquired it, spent several years improving
      >it and enlarging it, growing it, and now I have seven campuses.
      >
      >IMPACT: Tell me about the colleges.
      >
      >CB: I have five campuses in Utah: in Salt Lake City, Ogden, Provo,
      >Bountiful, and Logan; and two campuses in Colorado-in Denver and Fort
      >Collins. The Utah campuses are known as Stevens-Henager College; the ones
      >in
      >Colorado are known as CollegeAmerica. We teach in three main areas:
      >business, medical subjects, and computer science. In Utah, we offer
      >bachelor
      >degrees in business management, accounting, and computer science. We also
      >offer a wide range of associate degrees. Our curriculum is designed to give
      >the highest value to students, whom we consider customers. There are about
      >2,000 students today. Within five years, we plan to have 7,000, and 20-25
      >campuses. Our goal is to be number one in a particular state - in terms of
      >size and quality - and then to expand to neighboring states.
      >
      >IMPACT: How do you plan to do that?
      >
      >CB: The strategic plan is to concentrate the location of colleges, so there
      >can be lots of interaction between the campuses. To integrate them - if you
      >like - rather than disperse them all across the country, which many private
      >colleges do. There are perhaps a dozen public private-college chains, and
      >they just dot themselves all over the country without any thought to an
      >integrated organization.
      >
      >There are tremendous advantages to integrating. There are economies of
      >scale, for instance. Because the campuses are near each other, my staff
      >doesn't have to get on an airplane and fly in for staff meetings-they
      >simply
      >drive. We don't have to duplicate a lot of functions. We train the staff at
      >a central location. Similarly, we have all of the same financial-aid
      >programs as any of the major universities (unfortunately, but it's the way
      >you do business today in colleges). We have a strong, central financial aid
      >department, but we don't then need to duplicate that into the other
      >locations. The campuses are organized in a hub and satellite formation. If
      >there's a problem at a satellite campus, you can just send someone from the
      >main campus to take care of the problem, which, of course, is much more
      >economical.
      >
      >IMPACT: You said that you consider students "customers" - that's rare in
      >academia. How does your approach differ from other colleges?
      >
      >CB: Higher education is extremely arrogant in the way they treat their
      >students. They expect the student to travel perhaps thousands of miles to
      >come to their location and they teach many questionable courses. My model
      >is
      >to take the campus to the student. Our orientation is to do everything we
      >can to give the students - the customers - the highest value possible. When
      >we design a curriculum, we ask, "What courses will give students the
      >greatest knowledge and skills related to a career?" We do teach general
      >education, but even in the general education, we try to orient those
      >general
      >education courses so as to give students the highest value related to a
      >career.
      >
      >That's not to say we sacrifice intellectual rigor. We maintain structure
      >and
      >discipline - and the customer's not always right; and sometimes you have to
      >tell them they're wrong. On the other hand, we bear in mind that they're
      >paying a high tuition, and our job is to provide the highest possible value
      >in exchange for that tuition.
      >For instance we have student advisors/concierges. The purpose of the
      >concierges is to do everything they possibly can to help students through
      >the rough spots that they encounter while they're going through their
      >course
      >of study. Since we're a profit-making organization, we don't get paid
      >unless
      >the student stays in school. If they drop out, we lose the tuition. So it's
      >to our benefit to help students remain in school, complete their courses
      >and
      >succeed. At a typical college, instructors sometimes don't even take roll.
      >We take roll every day. If a student isn't there, someone will call them
      >and
      >say, "We missed you today. What's the problem?" We'll give them make-up
      >material, and encourage them to come back.
      >
      >IMPACT: What attracted you to this line of work?
      >
      >CB: There were two important personal values. First, I enjoy management. I
      >like working with bright, ambitious people, and getting something important
      >done. The other high value is education. It's a high personal value, and
      >objectively, it's an enormous value. These two values came together in a
      >private college. I aggressively pursue profit, but by pursuing important
      >values to me - the profit itself is a consequence. I love to make money, I
      >love to pursue profit. However, what's more important to me is the value of
      >doing something I really care about - i.e., management and education - and
      >then I make as much money at that as possible. The approach is first to
      >find
      >something you really love to do, something that fascinates you, excites
      >you,
      >and then make as much money at it as possible.
      >
      >Occasionally I hear people lament that that they don't make a lot of money
      >in their profession. But to me, that's the wrong view. They should do what
      >they love to do, and then secondarily, make as much profit as they possibly
      >can. You must love the doing. You must love what you do every day.
      >
      >[The conclusion of this interview will appear next month.]
      >
      >----
      >ARI Christmas Card
      >----
      >The 2001 ARI Christmas card salutes the American values that made New York
      >City - and the World Trade Center towers - possible. It features a painting
      >titled "The Stand" by Mr. Dale Flick, who has generously granted us
      >permission to use his work.
      >
      >In his letter to ARI Mr. Flick described his painting, which was completed
      >eight years ago: "When I painted 'The Stand' I wanted to convey the
      >perfectly natural life-giving assertiveness of the city emerging from a
      >surrounding fog. Those elements I had consciously included: The promise of
      >green branches: The patches of colored roofs penetrating the gray. The
      >title
      >itself originally referred to a stand of trees.... These are now
      >transposed.
      >Today, after that darkest of days, accidental elements of the painting have
      >moved to the foreground: The towers, still not the focus, but with their
      >hidden summits foreshadowing that day. The tree, the spontaneous life
      >force,
      >reaching beyond the frame, now perhaps into the future. The snow,
      >concealing, yet ready to reveal some sin, or wound. And the title, 'The
      >Stand,' now evoking the image of a rampart . . . . I understand that the
      >coming war will be decided on the battlefield of ideas and that your
      >organization is leading that battle. I would like to offer you, and any who
      >choose to join in the fight, a flag to carry into battle."
      >ARI is honored to accept his offer.
      >
      >A resident of Jersey City, NJ - in what was once in the shadow of the World
      >Trade Center - Mr. Flick is an architect by training, a professional
      >architectural model-maker, and an artist.
      >
      >The card features this quotation from Ayn Rand: "The charming aspect of
      >Christmas is the fact that it expresses good will in a cheerful, happy,
      >benevolent, non-sacrificial way." To see the card or place an order, go
      >to:
      >http://www.aynrand.org/support/xmas2001.shtml
      >
      >----
      >Shop Online, Benefit ARI
      >----
      >The following merchants will provide ARI with a royalty for each purchase
      >placed with them that originates on our site (www.aynrand.org): Amazon; Ayn
      >Rand Book Store; Blackstone Audio; and Oliver Computing (publisher of The
      >Objectivism Research CD-ROM). The royalties generated from such purchases
      >will benefit ARI's projects. In addition, customers who use iGive.com may
      >register ARI as the charity that they wish to support with their purchases.
      >IGive.com links to the online catalogues of more than 270 merchants. For
      >more information, visit: www.aynrand.org/support/
      >
      >----
      >Upcoming Live Events
      >----
      >University of Toronto
      >"Terrorism and Its Appeasement: Why a Great Nation Is Assaulted" by Richard
      >Salsman
      >Friday, November 16, 7:00pm; Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street, Room
      >2135
      >For more information, go to: www.uoftobjectivistclub.com
      >Or contact: utoc@...
      >
      >Washington University
      >"America at War: Why a Great Nation is Hated and Attacked" by Adam Mossoff
      >Tuesday, November 27; time and location TBA
      >For more information, contact Michael Ewens: mjewens@...
      >
      >Washington University
      >Debate: "Is This War Just?" featuring Adam Mossoff
      >Wednesday, November 28; time and location TBA
      >For more information, contact Michael Ewens: mjewens@...
      >
      >Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
      >"Introduction to Objectivism" by Andrew Bernstein
      >Wednesday, November 28, 7:00pm; Sage Laboratory, Room 3303
      >For more information, got to:
      >http://www.rpi.edu/dept/union/objectivist/public_html/
      >Or contact: objectivists@...
      >
      >


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    • Hanka, Greg
      There s a good article in this month s Reason magazine to the effect that the present crop of anti-war protesters are all utterly unable to suggest any
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 9, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        There's a good article in this month's 'Reason' magazine to
        the effect that the present crop of anti-war protesters are all
        utterly unable to suggest any alternative to this war. It's not
        like Vietnam, where we pull out and they leave us alone; nay,
        bin Laden has proven he is able and willing to reach into our
        homeland. Thus, ask an anti-war protester what we *should* do
        about September eleventh, if not war, and then do as Depeche Mode
        suggests: enjoy the silence.

        Greg

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Charlie Beel
        To: aynrandaggies@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: 11/9/01 1:22 PM
        Subject: [aynrandaggies] Fwd: ARI News for November

        good things happening :)

        Gig'em,
        Charlie



        >From: "The Ayn Rand Institute" <list.administrator@...>
        >Reply-To: <stewartm@...>
        >To: <rebelionel@...>
        >Subject: ARI News for November
        >Date: Fri, 9 Nov 2001 11:03:00 -0800
        >
        >Dear rebelionel@...,
        >
        >The semester is starting to wind down and it has been a busy one. ARI
        has
        >sponsored or co-sponsored a record number of live events, including
        >nineteen
        >talks on the September 11th terrorist attacks. Many of these talks,
        often
        >in conjunction with full-page ads featuring Dr. Leonard Peikoff's
        article
        >"End States Who Sponsor Terrorism," have had a substantial impact on
        >campus.
        >As the anti-war student groups begin to organize and become more vocal,
        it
        >is more important than ever to speak out in favor of America's right to
        >defend itself. Even if there's not a campus club at your school or in
        your
        >area, you can make a difference by voicing your opinion and by writing
        to
        >your school or local newspaper.
        >
        >Hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.
        >
        >Sincerely,
        >
        >Stewart Margolis
        >Campus Club Advisor
        >.......................................
        >
        >CONTENTS
        >----
        >-ARI AD CAUSING STIR ON CAMPUS
        >-CAMPUS TALK AT BERKELEY
        >-NOTE FROM DR. PEIKOFF
        >-INCREASE IN VISITORS TO ARI'S WEB SITE
        >-IN THE MEDIA
        >-INTRODUCING STUDENTS TO AYN RAND'S NOVELS
        >-ANDREW LEWIS RADIO SHOW - UPDATE
        >-Q&A WITH CARL BARNEY
        >-SHOP ONLINE, BENEFIT ARI
        >-UPCOMING LIVE EVENTS
        >
        >----
        >ARI Ad Causing Stir on Campus
        >----
        >On October 25, the San Francisco Chronicle reported:
        >"The campus paper at the University of California at Berkeley was
        stolen
        >from news racks yesterday in protest of an ad calling for the United
        States
        >to combat terrorism by overthrowing the government of Iran. [The
        thieves]
        >left an unsigned flyer accusing the Daily Californian of publishing
        'racist
        >hate speech' in an ad by Leonard Peikoff, founder of the Ayn Rand
        >Institute."
        >
        >For its part, the Daily Californian featured the story on its front
        page.
        >After excerpting from Dr. Peikoff's article, and quoting Dr. Yaron
        Brook,
        >the story noted that in reaction to the thefts, "other fliers appeared
        in
        >the newspaper boxes. . . . They reprinted the First Amendment, with the
        >phrase 'freedom of speech, or of the press' highlighted. . . . Other
        fliers
        >printed a quote attributed to Thomas Jefferson, saying 'Our liberty
        depends
        >on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being
        >lost.'"
        >
        >In an ARI press release, Dr. Brook said, "The thefts betray a contempt
        for
        >private property - the principle that makes free speech possible. They
        are
        >supporting the aims of the terrorists who have sought to annihilate the
        >principles on which America was founded."
        >
        >The story reached the national media. The Wall Street Journal online
        >edition
        >reported the story, under the title "Stealing Free Speech," with a link
        to
        >the full text of Dr. Peikoff's article.
        >
        >----
        >Campus Talk at Berkeley
        >----
        >Though anti-America protestors tried to subvert the right to free
        speech at
        >Berkeley, they were unsuccessful. Dr. Peikoff's article in the campus
        >newspaper coincided with an ARI campus talk by Dr. Gary Hull, which
        went
        >ahead as planned. Titled "Twin Towers Destroyed by the Ivory Tower,"
        the
        >talk showed that terrorism's ideology of hatred for reason, for
        happiness
        >on
        >earth, and for wealth is the very philosophy being taught in our
        >universities. Before it began, campus police warned those protestors
        who
        >came that no outbursts would be tolerated. After the talk, which was
        >without
        >incident, members of the Berkeley Objectivist campus club distributed
        >flyers
        >featuring Dr. Peikoff's article.
        >
        >----
        >Note from Dr. Peikoff
        >----
        >I was the only signer of ARI's articles on terrorism in the Washington
        Post
        >and The New York Times, but I had a lot of help, which I want to
        >acknowledge. John Allison was my primary inspiration and unfailing
        >morale-booster; he suggested the ads in the first place, and then, with
        >another donor, financed them. Steve Jolivette did hours of historical
        >research, Richard Ralston contributed specialized knowledge of the
        Mideast,
        >Yaron Brook made important structural improvements in the articles and
        >himself (at midnight) wrote the first draft of the section on Bush's
        flawed
        >policies. At the end, both Yaron and my wife, Amy - in marathon
        >line-editing sessions with me - went through my final drafts
        methodically,
        >one paragraph at a time, identifying possible sources of unclarity,
        >eliminating needless words, offering better alternatives. Some of
        their
        >editing I would have done myself, but only after I could look at the
        piece
        >with fresh eyes, days later - and we couldn't wait days. To all these
        >individuals, and especially to John, Yaron, and Amy, thank you for
        helping
        >me from the start and carrying through to the end.
        >
        >LEONARD PEIKOFF
        >
        >----
        >Increase in Visitors to ARI's Web Site
        >----
        >During September, the Institute's Web site - and the America at War
        section
        >in particular - attracted a record number of visitors: nearly
        >100,000-double
        >the number from August. The articles by Dr. Leonard Peikoff which
        appeared
        >as ads in The New York Times and The Washington Post were downloaded
        more
        >than 35,000 times (so far). All told, the site received 4.2 million
        page
        >requests.
        >
        >The Web site is being updated continually with op-eds and essays on the

        >war.
        >Most recently, we added an electronic version of the special issue of
        >Impact
        >(which was mailed to all donors), the article "Religion vs. America" by
        Dr.
        >Leonard Peikoff and the transcript of "America vs. Death-Worship: The
        Moral
        >Meaning of the Coming War," a talk by Dr. Harry Binswanger. Visit:
        >www.aynrand.org.
        >
        >----
        >In the Media
        >----
        >Following his first appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor," Dr. Leonard
        >Peikoff
        >was invited back to be a guest on the show. On Oct. 12 he was
        interviewed
        >by
        >the John Kasich, who was filling in for Bill O'Reilly. ARI continues
        to
        >receive letters and e-mails in reaction to Dr. Peikoff's appearance on
        the
        >show, as well as his two newspaper editorials.
        >
        >*Attention From Unexpected Quarters*
        >Dr. Peikoff's television appearances have attracted the attention not
        only
        >of the American public, but also of commentators in unexpected
        quarters. A
        >recent column in The New Republic - a conservative magazine long
        scornful
        >of
        >Ayn Rand and of Objectivism - reported approvingly on Dr. Peikoff's
        >appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor." Perhaps just as unexpected was
        the
        >publication of an ARI op-ed, titled "Terrorists vs. America," in the
        Jordan
        >Times of Amman, Jordan. The article, written by Dr. Michael Berliner,
        >identifies the virtues for which Islamic terrorists hate America. The
        >Jordan
        >Times reprinted the article with only one omission. The following
        sentence
        >was cut: "The terrorists must destroy anything that interferes with the
        >dictates of Allah or the desires of Mother Earth." To read this op-ed,
        as
        >well as more than a hundred others, visit ARI's Web site:
        >www.aynrand.org/medialink.
        >
        >*Wartime Intellectual Activism*
        >We continue to hear about dozens of ARI supporters whose letters to the
        >editor have been published. At the last count, Glenn Woiceshyn has had
        20
        >letters in major newspapers around the world. (Mr. Woiceshyn has
        written
        >op-eds for ARI.) We've received word that on October 13, both Chip
        Joyce
        >and
        >Michael Gold had letters in The New York Times.
        >
        >----
        >Introducing Students to Ayn Rand's Novels
        >----
        >Last month ARI's "Fountainhead" and "Anthem" essay contests began
        accepting
        >submissions. To publicize the contests, we have mailed flyers, which
        list
        >the essay questions and contest rules, to about 265,000 educators. Our
        >mailing targeted high school teachers, librarians, and guidance
        counselors
        >throughout the United States. Thanks to a $20,000 grant earmarked to
        help
        >promote the contests, we were able to expand the mailing to include
        7,000
        >educators in Canada and at American schools abroad, whom we could not
        >afford
        >to contact last year. The grant has also enabled us to place numerous
        >advertisements in teachers' magazines and other education periodicals.
        >Each year the essay contests introduce thousands of high school
        students to
        >Ayn Rand's novels. "The Fountainhead" contest (now in its 17th year)
        and
        >the
        >"Anthem" contest (in its 10th year) together have attracted more than
        >85,000
        >submissions.
        >
        >"The impact of the contests is much wider," said Marilee Dahl, who
        manages
        >the project. "We know that every year there are students who read the
        >novels, because teachers assigned the books in class, but who do not
        enter
        >the contests. Word of mouth also is a factor. We know that many
        students
        >hear about the books from others who do enter the contests. So the
        number
        >of
        >students who learn about the books as a result of the contests is
        probably
        >higher than the number of entries."
        >
        >To encourage the teaching of Miss Rand's books, ARI offers educators
        free
        >classroom materials such as lesson plans and guides to the novels. The
        >deadline for entering the "Anthem" contest is March 18, 2002; "The
        >Fountainhead," April 15, 2002. To download a copy of this year's flyer,
        or
        >to learn more about the contests, visit: www.aynrand.org/contests/.
        >
        >*NOTE: A separate announcement will be going out shortly regarding the
        >"Atlas Shrugged" essay contest for college students.
        >
        >----
        >Andrew Lewis Radio Show: Update
        >----
        >The Andrew Lewis Radio Show is on air at a new time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00
        p.m.
        >(Pacific) on Sundays. Since becoming a project of ARI, the show has
        added a
        >new radio station to its list of affiliates.
        >
        >KCAA 1050 AM, in Yorba Linda, CA, is scheduled to start carrying the
        show
        >in
        >December. The station covers a sizeable portion of Southern
        >California--from
        >southeast Los Angeles, to Palm Springs in the west, to parts of San
        Diego
        >county. It has an estimated (potential) audience of 3.2 million
        listeners.
        >
        >Recent guests on the show have included: Dr. Leonard Peikoff, Dr. Yaron
        >Brook and Peter Schwartz. To listen to archived programs on the
        Internet,
        >visit: www.alshow.com. To receive e-mail updates on upcoming show
        topics,
        >send your request to: comment@....
        >
        >----
        >Q&A with Carl Barney
        >----
        >A founding contributor and an active supporter of ARI, Mr. Carl Barney
        >joined the Institute's board of directors in 1999. Among other business
        >activities, Mr. Barney owns and manages several private colleges in
        >Colorado
        >and Utah. Impact spoke to him about his business career and the
        influence
        >that Ayn Rand's ideas have had on his life. The concluding part of this
        >interview will appear next month.
        >
        >IMPACT: When and where did you first encounter Ayn Rand's ideas?
        >
        >Carl Barney: I was born and went to school in England, but left when I
        was
        >18 to travel the world. If I could have articulated what I was looking
        for
        >at that time, it was a comprehensive view, a philosophy of life. Over a

        >span
        >of about eight months, I traveled through Europe and Asia, and ended up
        in
        >Australia, which was my goal. It was fascinating, and I had lots of
        great
        >adventures, but I didn't find a philosophy. It was many years later
        before
        >I
        >actually found the philosophy I was looking for. In the early 80s,
        about
        >twenty years later, when I was living in the U.S. I met a woman in a
        >business context who said some startling things, such as "This is your
        >private property. We have a contract, and I'll honor that contract. I
        don't
        >want anything from you which isn't earned or deserved." Wow, this is
        >different! I thought. [laughs] Surprised to hear her say such things, I

        >told
        >her that I was intrigued. She said, "You need to read 'Atlas
        Shrugged.'"
        >
        >IMPACT: What was the immediate impact? How did it shape the course of
        your
        >life?
        >
        >CB: Well, in the early 80's I was looking for a career-what to do with
        the
        >second half of my life-and I had read "Atlas Shrugged," and had taken
        some
        >of Dr. Leonard Peikoff's courses. I set myself the task of finding
        >something
        >which I really loved to do and which I was willing to spend the rest of
        my
        >life doing. I read Miss Rand's article "The Objectivist Ethics," in
        "The
        >Virtue of Selfishness," and I found what I was looking for in terms of
        a
        >method, i.e., a means of identifying values in many areas of life, and
        of
        >how to arrange them in a hierarchy.
        >
        >By following the process, explicit and implicit, in "The Objectivist
        >Ethics," I identified a career purpose, which was to own and manage
        private
        >colleges. Having gone through that rational process thoroughly, looked
        at
        >my
        >values, written them down, integrated them, I found that I gained an
        >understanding, a certainty. Not only concerning what I was doing, but
        why I
        >was doing it. It gave me a great deal of clarity and motivation. In a
        >sense,
        >the purpose almost had a life of its own: I was strongly motivated.
        >
        >
        >After I did that, I immediately went out and did a search for a private
        >college to acquire. I found one, acquired it, spent several years
        improving
        >it and enlarging it, growing it, and now I have seven campuses.
        >
        >IMPACT: Tell me about the colleges.
        >
        >CB: I have five campuses in Utah: in Salt Lake City, Ogden, Provo,
        >Bountiful, and Logan; and two campuses in Colorado-in Denver and Fort
        >Collins. The Utah campuses are known as Stevens-Henager College; the
        ones
        >in
        >Colorado are known as CollegeAmerica. We teach in three main areas:
        >business, medical subjects, and computer science. In Utah, we offer
        >bachelor
        >degrees in business management, accounting, and computer science. We
        also
        >offer a wide range of associate degrees. Our curriculum is designed to
        give
        >the highest value to students, whom we consider customers. There are
        about
        >2,000 students today. Within five years, we plan to have 7,000, and
        20-25
        >campuses. Our goal is to be number one in a particular state - in terms
        of
        >size and quality - and then to expand to neighboring states.
        >
        >IMPACT: How do you plan to do that?
        >
        >CB: The strategic plan is to concentrate the location of colleges, so
        there
        >can be lots of interaction between the campuses. To integrate them - if
        you
        >like - rather than disperse them all across the country, which many
        private
        >colleges do. There are perhaps a dozen public private-college chains,
        and
        >they just dot themselves all over the country without any thought to an
        >integrated organization.
        >
        >There are tremendous advantages to integrating. There are economies of
        >scale, for instance. Because the campuses are near each other, my staff
        >doesn't have to get on an airplane and fly in for staff meetings-they
        >simply
        >drive. We don't have to duplicate a lot of functions. We train the
        staff at
        >a central location. Similarly, we have all of the same financial-aid
        >programs as any of the major universities (unfortunately, but it's the
        way
        >you do business today in colleges). We have a strong, central financial
        aid
        >department, but we don't then need to duplicate that into the other
        >locations. The campuses are organized in a hub and satellite formation.
        If
        >there's a problem at a satellite campus, you can just send someone from
        the
        >main campus to take care of the problem, which, of course, is much more
        >economical.
        >
        >IMPACT: You said that you consider students "customers" - that's rare
        in
        >academia. How does your approach differ from other colleges?
        >
        >CB: Higher education is extremely arrogant in the way they treat their
        >students. They expect the student to travel perhaps thousands of miles
        to
        >come to their location and they teach many questionable courses. My
        model
        >is
        >to take the campus to the student. Our orientation is to do everything
        we
        >can to give the students - the customers - the highest value possible.
        When
        >we design a curriculum, we ask, "What courses will give students the
        >greatest knowledge and skills related to a career?" We do teach general
        >education, but even in the general education, we try to orient those
        >general
        >education courses so as to give students the highest value related to a
        >career.
        >
        >That's not to say we sacrifice intellectual rigor. We maintain
        structure
        >and
        >discipline - and the customer's not always right; and sometimes you
        have to
        >tell them they're wrong. On the other hand, we bear in mind that
        they're
        >paying a high tuition, and our job is to provide the highest possible
        value
        >in exchange for that tuition.
        >For instance we have student advisors/concierges. The purpose of the
        >concierges is to do everything they possibly can to help students
        through
        >the rough spots that they encounter while they're going through their
        >course
        >of study. Since we're a profit-making organization, we don't get paid
        >unless
        >the student stays in school. If they drop out, we lose the tuition. So
        it's
        >to our benefit to help students remain in school, complete their
        courses
        >and
        >succeed. At a typical college, instructors sometimes don't even take
        roll.
        >We take roll every day. If a student isn't there, someone will call
        them
        >and
        >say, "We missed you today. What's the problem?" We'll give them make-up
        >material, and encourage them to come back.
        >
        >IMPACT: What attracted you to this line of work?
        >
        >CB: There were two important personal values. First, I enjoy
        management. I
        >like working with bright, ambitious people, and getting something
        important
        >done. The other high value is education. It's a high personal value,
        and
        >objectively, it's an enormous value. These two values came together in
        a
        >private college. I aggressively pursue profit, but by pursuing
        important
        >values to me - the profit itself is a consequence. I love to make
        money, I
        >love to pursue profit. However, what's more important to me is the
        value of
        >doing something I really care about - i.e., management and education -
        and
        >then I make as much money at that as possible. The approach is first to

        >find
        >something you really love to do, something that fascinates you, excites

        >you,
        >and then make as much money at it as possible.
        >
        >Occasionally I hear people lament that that they don't make a lot of
        money
        >in their profession. But to me, that's the wrong view. They should do
        what
        >they love to do, and then secondarily, make as much profit as they
        possibly
        >can. You must love the doing. You must love what you do every day.
        >
        >[The conclusion of this interview will appear next month.]
        >
        >----
        >ARI Christmas Card
        >----
        >The 2001 ARI Christmas card salutes the American values that made New
        York
        >City - and the World Trade Center towers - possible. It features a
        painting
        >titled "The Stand" by Mr. Dale Flick, who has generously granted us
        >permission to use his work.
        >
        >In his letter to ARI Mr. Flick described his painting, which was
        completed
        >eight years ago: "When I painted 'The Stand' I wanted to convey the
        >perfectly natural life-giving assertiveness of the city emerging from a
        >surrounding fog. Those elements I had consciously included: The promise
        of
        >green branches: The patches of colored roofs penetrating the gray. The
        >title
        >itself originally referred to a stand of trees.... These are now
        >transposed.
        >Today, after that darkest of days, accidental elements of the painting
        have
        >moved to the foreground: The towers, still not the focus, but with
        their
        >hidden summits foreshadowing that day. The tree, the spontaneous life
        >force,
        >reaching beyond the frame, now perhaps into the future. The snow,
        >concealing, yet ready to reveal some sin, or wound. And the title, 'The
        >Stand,' now evoking the image of a rampart . . . . I understand that
        the
        >coming war will be decided on the battlefield of ideas and that your
        >organization is leading that battle. I would like to offer you, and any
        who
        >choose to join in the fight, a flag to carry into battle."
        >ARI is honored to accept his offer.
        >
        >A resident of Jersey City, NJ - in what was once in the shadow of the
        World
        >Trade Center - Mr. Flick is an architect by training, a professional
        >architectural model-maker, and an artist.
        >
        >The card features this quotation from Ayn Rand: "The charming aspect of
        >Christmas is the fact that it expresses good will in a cheerful, happy,
        >benevolent, non-sacrificial way." To see the card or place an order,
        go
        >to:
        >http://www.aynrand.org/support/xmas2001.shtml
        >
        >----
        >Shop Online, Benefit ARI
        >----
        >The following merchants will provide ARI with a royalty for each
        purchase
        >placed with them that originates on our site (www.aynrand.org): Amazon;
        Ayn
        >Rand Book Store; Blackstone Audio; and Oliver Computing (publisher of
        The
        >Objectivism Research CD-ROM). The royalties generated from such
        purchases
        >will benefit ARI's projects. In addition, customers who use iGive.com
        may
        >register ARI as the charity that they wish to support with their
        purchases.
        >IGive.com links to the online catalogues of more than 270 merchants.
        For
        >more information, visit: www.aynrand.org/support/
        >
        >----
        >Upcoming Live Events
        >----
        >University of Toronto
        >"Terrorism and Its Appeasement: Why a Great Nation Is Assaulted" by
        Richard
        >Salsman
        >Friday, November 16, 7:00pm; Sidney Smith Hall, 100 St. George Street,
        Room
        >2135
        >For more information, go to: www.uoftobjectivistclub.com
        >Or contact: utoc@...
        >
        >Washington University
        >"America at War: Why a Great Nation is Hated and Attacked" by Adam
        Mossoff
        >Tuesday, November 27; time and location TBA
        >For more information, contact Michael Ewens: mjewens@...
        >
        >Washington University
        >Debate: "Is This War Just?" featuring Adam Mossoff
        >Wednesday, November 28; time and location TBA
        >For more information, contact Michael Ewens: mjewens@...
        >
        >Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
        >"Introduction to Objectivism" by Andrew Bernstein
        >Wednesday, November 28, 7:00pm; Sage Laboratory, Room 3303
        >For more information, got to:
        >http://www.rpi.edu/dept/union/objectivist/public_html/
        >Or contact: objectivists@...
        >
        >


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