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Re: IOM Report on Thimerosal and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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  • AndyCutler@aol.com
    ... I think this is actually pretty good. Amazingly good. They aren t stonewalling! Andy
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 1, 2001
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      --- In Autism-Mercury@y..., Sally Bernard <sbernard@n...> wrote:
      > ...
      > The Committee concluded that
      > "although the hypothesis that exposure to
      > thimerosal-containing vaccines could be associated with
      > neurodevelopmental disorders is not established and rests on
      > indirect and incomplete information, primarily from
      > analogies with methylmercury and levels of maximum mercury
      > exposure from vaccines given in children, the hypothesis is
      > biologically plausible." They also conclude that "the
      > evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal
      > relationship between thimerosal exposures from childhood
      > vaccines and the neurodevelopmental disords of autism, ADHD,
      > and speech or language delay."
      >
      > Having attended the meeting, these conclusions are what I
      > expected.

      I think this is actually pretty good. Amazingly good. They aren't
      stonewalling!

      Andy
    • Moria Merriweather
      ... I also read it as very good . To say that it is not proven either way and that it is biologically plausible is wonderfully descriptive, and I think very
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 2, 2001
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        >--- In Autism-Mercury@y..., Sally Bernard <sbernard@n...> wrote:
        >> ...
        >> The Committee concluded that
        >> "although the hypothesis that exposure to
        >> thimerosal-containing vaccines could be associated with
        >> neurodevelopmental disorders is not established and rests on
        >> indirect and incomplete information, primarily from
        >> analogies with methylmercury and levels of maximum mercury
        >> exposure from vaccines given in children, the hypothesis is
        >> biologically plausible." They also conclude that "the
        >> evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal
        >> relationship between thimerosal exposures from childhood
        >> vaccines and the neurodevelopmental disords of autism, ADHD,
        >> and speech or language delay."
        >>
        >> Having attended the meeting, these conclusions are what I
        >> expected.
        >
        >I think this is actually pretty good. Amazingly good. They aren't
        >stonewalling!
        >
        >Andy

        I also read it as "very good". To say that it is not proven either
        way and that it is biologically plausible is wonderfully descriptive,
        and I think very accurate. I'm happy to have another voice (besides
        mine) saying that "not proven" is NOT the same as "proven wrong". It
        is an incredibly important distinction, and they actually take this
        position. :)
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