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Re: "Please go away" moments

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  • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
    ... ANYTHING ... would ... Kass would find all the flaws in that stuff too, don t let her fool you. It s the Irish that s the worse. Because their is so
    Message 1 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
      --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., "Amy L. Hornburg Heilveil" <aheilvei@u...>
      wrote:
      >
      > >Sometimes I wish I'd chosen to be English or French or something,
      ANYTHING
      > >other than Japanese and Irish...
      > >
      > >Kass
      >
      > and then the little demon in you pops out and asks, "now what fun
      would
      > that be?"
      >
      > Despina ;^D

      Kass would find all the flaws in that stuff too, don't let her fool
      you. It's the Irish that's the worse. Because their is so little,
      extant, painted or even written, it's too easy to just want to fill
      in with fantasy. At least with the Japanese you can point to extant
      garments and say "Here, stupid look at these!"
      - Brynn
    • historian@reconstructinghistory.com
      ... Oh yeah. Like that actually *works*... Did you see how many women at the Teahouse in February were wearing chopsticks in their hair and wide modern obi?
      Message 2 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
        > Kass would find all the flaws in that stuff too, don't let her fool
        > you. It's the Irish that's the worse. Because their is so little,
        > extant, painted or even written, it's too easy to just want to fill
        > in with fantasy. At least with the Japanese you can point to extant
        > garments and say "Here, stupid look at these!"

        Oh yeah. Like that actually *works*...

        Did you see how many women at the Teahouse in February were wearing
        chopsticks in their hair and wide modern obi? Did you?

        <sigh>

        Kass
      • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
        It s the Irish that s the worse. Because their is so little, ... fill ... extant ... That s because A: they can t read or B: they didn t even bother to look. I
        Message 3 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
          It's the Irish that's the worse. Because their is so little,
          > > extant, painted or even written, it's too easy to just want to
          fill
          > > in with fantasy. At least with the Japanese you can point to
          extant
          > > garments and say "Here, stupid look at these!"
          >
          > Oh yeah. Like that actually *works*...
          >
          > Did you see how many women at the Teahouse in February were wearing
          > chopsticks in their hair and wide modern obi? Did you?
          >
          > <sigh>
          >
          > Kass

          That's because A: they can't read or B: they didn't even bother to
          look. I think it's more like they didn't bother to look, they picked
          an 18th or someother much later source and that's what they do.
          Research is not a word in thier vocabulary.
          - Brynn
        • historian@reconstructinghistory.com
          ... picked ... Would that they picked a source at all! I was under the impression that they just wore what looked right to them. Kass
          Message 4 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
            > That's because A: they can't read or B: they didn't even bother to
            > look. I think it's more like they didn't bother to look, they
            picked
            > an 18th or someother much later source and that's what they do.
            > Research is not a word in thier vocabulary.

            Would that they picked a source at all! I was under the impression
            that they just wore what "looked right" to them.

            Kass
          • rowengr@hotmail.com
            ... wearing ... Well, at my very first attempt at Japanese garb (about 23 years back) I too had a wide modern obi. (I presently discovered that a) it wasn t
            Message 5 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
              --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., s_krasley@r... wrote:

              > > Did you see how many women at the Teahouse in February were
              wearing
              > > chopsticks in their hair and wide modern obi? Did you?
              > > Kass
              >
              > That's because A: they can't read or B: they didn't even bother to
              > look. I think it's more like they didn't bother to look, they picked
              > an 18th or someother much later source and that's what they do.
              > Research is not a word in thier vocabulary.
              > - Brynn

              Well, at my very first attempt at Japanese garb (about 23 years back)
              I too had a wide modern obi. (I presently discovered that a) it
              wasn't appropriate and b) narrower ones were more comfortable ;) and
              altered my style.

              But I never, ever, wore chopsticks in my hair (even when it was pinned
              up.) I'm afraid I once responded to someone's question about where to
              purchase "chopsticks to wear in the hair" with a comment that it was
              no more appropriate than wearing forks in the hair....

              Rowen
            • s_krasley@recordtrak.com
              ... to ... You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can t make them read it.(or follow it). - Brynn
              Message 6 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                --- In Authentic_SCA@y..., historian@r... wrote:
                > > That's because A: they can't read or B: they didn't even bother
                to
                > > look. I think it's more like they didn't bother to look, they
                > picked
                > > an 18th or someother much later source and that's what they do.
                > > Research is not a word in thier vocabulary.
                >
                > Would that they picked a source at all! I was under the impression
                > that they just wore what "looked right" to them.
                >
                > Kass


                You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can't make them read it.(or
                follow it).
                - Brynn
              • L Joseph
                ... (tiny little voice) Makiwara didn t. Chopsticks are for eating one s rice or for poking ones eyes out when faced with too scary visuals. ===== I do but
                Message 7 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                  --- historian@... wrote:
                  > Oh yeah. Like that actually *works*...
                  >
                  > Did you see how many women at the Teahouse in
                  > February were wearing
                  > chopsticks in their hair and wide modern obi? Did
                  > you?

                  (tiny little voice) Makiwara didn't. Chopsticks are
                  for eating one's rice or for poking ones eyes out when
                  faced with too scary visuals.

                  =====
                  "I do but sing because I must, And pipe but as the linnets sing."
                  Alfred, Lord Tennyson, "In Memoriam."

                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Get personalized email addresses from Yahoo! Mail
                  http://personal.mail.yahoo.com/
                • historian@reconstructinghistory.com
                  ... back) ... and ... Well, me too Rowen. I wore a wide modern obi and a modern uchikake bridal kimono at my first Pennsic. But it was my second event ever
                  Message 8 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                    > Well, at my very first attempt at Japanese garb (about 23 years
                    back)
                    > I too had a wide modern obi. (I presently discovered that a) it
                    > wasn't appropriate and b) narrower ones were more comfortable ;)
                    and
                    > altered my style.

                    Well, me too Rowen. I wore a wide modern obi and a modern uchikake
                    bridal kimono at my first Pennsic. But it was my second event ever
                    and I never wore it again.

                    But I might add that Pennsic did not have an event announcement that
                    read "Click here for information on Japanese garb for this event" but
                    the infamous Teahouse most definitely did.

                    > But I never, ever, wore chopsticks in my hair (even when it was
                    pinned
                    > up.) I'm afraid I once responded to someone's question about where
                    to
                    > purchase "chopsticks to wear in the hair" with a comment that it
                    was
                    > no more appropriate than wearing forks in the hair....

                    Good answer!

                    Kass
                  • Jeff Gedney
                    ... I, for one, am consistently amused by these ninjas running around in traditional Bun Raku puppeteer costumes. (I believe that they were later used in
                    Message 9 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                      > > Kass would find all the flaws in that stuff too, don't let her fool
                      > > you. It's the Irish that's the worse. Because their is so little,
                      > > extant, painted or even written, it's too easy to just want to fill
                      > > in with fantasy. At least with the Japanese you can point to extant
                      > > garments and say "Here, stupid look at these!"

                      I, for one, am consistently amused by these "ninjas" running around in
                      traditional "Bun Raku" puppeteer costumes.
                      (I believe that they were later used in Noh theater as a metaphor for an
                      invisible force, since one trained oneself not to "see" the puppeteer. Thus
                      the notion was later applied to the concept of hidden, and then ultimately
                      became a cheap and somewhat OOP theatrical device for a Ninja in stealth.
                      But I think that in period, it is no more likely that a ninja actually
                      _wore_ that outfit than they would have worn elf ears... After all, the
                      puppeteer outfit hardly "blends in"... )

                      Elias
                    • historian@reconstructinghistory.com
                      ... in ... for an ... puppeteer. Thus ... ultimately ... stealth. ... actually ... all, the ... Uh huh! We call them Black Pajama Clan . ;) Kass
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                        > I, for one, am consistently amused by these "ninjas" running around
                        in
                        > traditional "Bun Raku" puppeteer costumes.
                        > (I believe that they were later used in Noh theater as a metaphor
                        for an
                        > invisible force, since one trained oneself not to "see" the
                        puppeteer. Thus
                        > the notion was later applied to the concept of hidden, and then
                        ultimately
                        > became a cheap and somewhat OOP theatrical device for a Ninja in
                        stealth.
                        > But I think that in period, it is no more likely that a ninja
                        actually
                        > _wore_ that outfit than they would have worn elf ears... After
                        all, the
                        > puppeteer outfit hardly "blends in"... )

                        Uh huh!

                        We call them "Black Pajama Clan". ;)

                        Kass
                      • Jeff Gedney
                        ... Yeah, they sure would not walk around wearing such an outfit! Even if it WERE an ninja Costume why would a ninja walk around advertising that they are
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                          > We call them "Black Pajama Clan". ;)
                          >
                          > Kass

                          Yeah, they sure would not walk around wearing such an outfit!
                          Even if it WERE an "ninja Costume" why would a ninja walk around
                          advertising that they are essentially an asassin and terrorist? Might as
                          well walk around London wearing the Broad Arrow!

                          Elias
                        • historian@reconstructinghistory.com
                          ... Might as ... I think you just paraphrased Effingham s CA (#65)... Kass
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                            > Yeah, they sure would not walk around wearing such an outfit!
                            > Even if it WERE an "ninja Costume" why would a ninja walk around
                            > advertising that they are essentially an asassin and terrorist?
                            Might as
                            > well walk around London wearing the Broad Arrow!

                            I think you just paraphrased Effingham's CA (#65)...

                            Kass
                          • Anthony J. Bryant
                            ... You should check out my short essay The Ninja Thing in the Japanese Miscellany. http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo/Miscellany/Ninja.html Effingham
                            Message 13 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                              Jeff Gedney wrote:

                              > > > Kass would find all the flaws in that stuff too, don't let her fool
                              > > > you. It's the Irish that's the worse. Because their is so little,
                              > > > extant, painted or even written, it's too easy to just want to fill
                              > > > in with fantasy. At least with the Japanese you can point to extant
                              > > > garments and say "Here, stupid look at these!"
                              >
                              > I, for one, am consistently amused by these "ninjas" running around in
                              > traditional "Bun Raku" puppeteer costumes.
                              > (I believe that they were later used in Noh theater as a metaphor for an
                              > invisible force, since one trained oneself not to "see" the puppeteer. Thus
                              > the notion was later applied to the concept of hidden, and then ultimately
                              > became a cheap and somewhat OOP theatrical device for a Ninja in stealth.
                              > But I think that in period, it is no more likely that a ninja actually
                              > _wore_ that outfit than they would have worn elf ears... After all, the
                              > puppeteer outfit hardly "blends in"... )

                              You should check out my short essay "The Ninja Thing" in the Japanese
                              Miscellany.

                              http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo/Miscellany/Ninja.html

                              Effingham
                            • Jeff Gedney
                              On Monday, July 02, 2001 3:56 PM, Anthony J. Bryant ... Brilliant. I love it. I gotta start getting CA. We used to have a member of my household who insisted
                              Message 14 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                On Monday, July 02, 2001 3:56 PM, Anthony J. Bryant
                                [SMTP:ajbryant@...] wrote:
                                > Jeff Gedney wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                > You should check out my short essay "The Ninja Thing" in the Japanese
                                > Miscellany.
                                >
                                > http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo/Miscellany/Ninja.html
                                >

                                Brilliant.
                                I love it. I gotta start getting CA.

                                We used to have a member of my household who insisted on wearing the ninja
                                pajamas to events. we took to calling him "tree" cause obviously we could
                                not "see" him, since he was "invisible", so he "must be hiding behind that
                                funny black tree"...
                                Wasn't too long before he gave that up.
                                (especially as he realized that nobody was particularly impressed. He was a
                                skinny geek who had _no_ martial arts training, just way too many "asassin"
                                class characters in d&d)


                                Elias
                              • Anthony J. Bryant
                                ... Thank you. If you like Japanese things at all, I d recommend hitting my homepage ( http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo) and the proto garb page:
                                Message 15 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                  Jeff Gedney wrote:

                                  > On Monday, July 02, 2001 3:56 PM, Anthony J. Bryant
                                  > [SMTP:ajbryant@...] wrote:
                                  > > Jeff Gedney wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > You should check out my short essay "The Ninja Thing" in the Japanese
                                  > > Miscellany.
                                  > >
                                  > > http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo/Miscellany/Ninja.html
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > Brilliant.
                                  > I love it. I gotta start getting CA.
                                  >

                                  Thank you. <G>

                                  If you like Japanese things at all, I'd recommend hitting my homepage (
                                  http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo) and the proto garb page:
                                  http://www.geocities.com/sengokudaimyo/garb/GarbHome.html

                                  >
                                  > We used to have a member of my household who insisted on wearing the ninja
                                  > pajamas to events. we took to calling him "tree" cause obviously we could
                                  > not "see" him, since he was "invisible", so he "must be hiding behind that
                                  > funny black tree"...
                                  > Wasn't too long before he gave that up.
                                  > (especially as he realized that nobody was particularly impressed. He was a
                                  > skinny geek who had _no_ martial arts training, just way too many "asassin"
                                  > class characters in d&d)
                                  >

                                  Oh, did I know a pile of these folks...

                                  And it became worse when I became editor of Dragon Magazine. For some reason,
                                  people love writing the editor with all their cool D&D gaming stories...

                                  Effingham
                                • Kate Jones
                                  Greetings! This weekend I had one of the best flea-market days I ve ever had...well, except for the heat. But, anyway, I picked up a pair of sheepskins for not
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                    Greetings!

                                    This weekend I had one of the best flea-market days I've ever
                                    had...well, except for the heat. But, anyway, I picked up a pair of
                                    sheepskins for not a whole lot of money, and now I'm trying to find
                                    out how to wash them. They're not filthy, but there's a few dirty
                                    spots...

                                    Also, while they're not really matted or felted, they're a
                                    bit...clumped. Can I just try to brush them out, or is there anything
                                    else I can do?

                                    (also found a wooden box to keep garb in at events, and a drawknife
                                    and auger for woodworking without power tools... :)

                                    Thank you all!

                                    Kat'ryna
                                    --
                                    Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
                                    kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
                                  • Grooby, Peter
                                    ... I ve heard that regular home use shampoo is good for cleaning wool. Wool and hair are similar to each other, and what is good for cleaning one, should be
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                      > Greetings!
                                      >
                                      > This weekend I had one of the best flea-market days I've ever
                                      > had...well, except for the heat. But, anyway, I picked up a pair of
                                      > sheepskins for not a whole lot of money, and now I'm trying to find
                                      > out how to wash them. They're not filthy, but there's a few dirty
                                      > spots...
                                      >
                                      I've heard that regular home use shampoo is good for cleaning wool.
                                      Wool and hair are similar to each other, and what is good for cleaning one,
                                      should be good for cleaning the other.

                                      Vitale


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                                    • Kirrily Robert
                                      ... At this point, I have to relate a story which has nothing to do with anything much, except that I find it funny. One of the people who was instrumental in
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                        Effingham wrote:

                                        >It's like those moments we've talked about, when people misquote you to
                                        >you.<G>

                                        At this point, I have to relate a story which has nothing to do with
                                        anything much, except that I find it funny.

                                        One of the people who was instrumental in getting the SCA happening in
                                        Australia was a woman who goes by the name of Rowan. She's very much
                                        loved and admired, and when her local group were looking for a name they
                                        decided to call it "Rowany" after her. That was about 15 years ago,
                                        or more.

                                        The barony of Rowany holds a camping event over Easter each year, called
                                        "Rowany Festival". People come from all around Lochac and even from
                                        beyond the seas to attend it. If you join the SCA through a college, at
                                        the start of the academic year (late February to early March) you'll
                                        hear *all* about Rowany Festival immediately.

                                        Anyway, the story itself: A newish college member was at a large SCA
                                        event, and ended up chatting to Mistress Rowan. The newcomer had heard
                                        about how everyone has an SCA name, and asked what Rowan's was. When
                                        Rowan answered, the newcomer is reported to have answered: "That's a
                                        bit pretentious isn't it? I mean, naming yourself after the festival!"

                                        - - - - -

                                        Fast forward a few years, to a night at Rowany Festival when we were
                                        sitting around a campfire after an evening of "peasanty muck" (you had
                                        to be there) drinking truly horrible wine ("red surprise or white
                                        surprise?" was what I was offered when I arrived). Rowan showed up and
                                        was offered some peasanty muck and red surprise, and we asked her about
                                        this story. See, it had been doing the rounds for years and we wanted
                                        to know whether it had actually happened, and also what her reaction had
                                        been.

                                        She was surprised to hear that the story had been going round for years
                                        without her knowing, but confirmed that the incident had in fact
                                        occurred, and that her response had been to stifle her laughter and make
                                        an excuse to escape ASAP.

                                        I don't know what else she could have done, under the circumstances, and
                                        on a couple of occasions I've realised that it's the only way to cope
                                        without causing offence. Just pretend that you need to urgently talk to
                                        someone you've just spotted on the other side of the hall, and run away
                                        before your ears bleed or any other nasty symptoms occur :)

                                        Yours,

                                        Katherine

                                        --
                                        Lady Katherine Robillard (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                                        katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                                        Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                                        "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                                      • Kirrily Robert
                                        ... ... but you can t make them think would scan better. Who was it that, when asked to use the word horticulture in a sentence, said: You can lead a
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                          Brynn wrote:
                                          >
                                          >You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can't make them read it.(or
                                          >follow it).

                                          "... but you can't make them think" would scan better.

                                          Who was it that, when asked to use the word "horticulture" in a
                                          sentence, said: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her
                                          think"?

                                          Yours,

                                          Katherine

                                          --
                                          Lady Katherine Robillard (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                                          katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                                          Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                                          "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                                        • Jeanne Harney
                                          ... From: Kirrily Robert ... I first encountered it as the punchline to a horrid pun in the Callahans books by Spider Robinson. Jeanne
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Jul 2, 2001
                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: "Kirrily Robert" <skud@...>
                                            Brynn wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > >You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can't make them read it.(or
                                            > >follow it).
                                            >
                                            > "... but you can't make them think" would scan better.
                                            >
                                            > Who was it that, when asked to use the word "horticulture" in a
                                            > sentence, said: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her
                                            > think"?

                                            I first encountered it as the punchline to a horrid pun in the Callahans
                                            books by Spider Robinson.

                                            Jeanne
                                            who bought a war wagon today. I walked into the dealership, wrote a check,
                                            and walked out with an extended cab van. Tres cool!
                                          • Kirrily Robert
                                            ... Ahh, Google tells me it was Dorothy Parker. Not too surprising, I suppose. ObTopic: ARGH! 5 weeks to Pennsic, and two of them are taken up by conferences!
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Jul 3, 2001
                                              Jehanne said:
                                              >> Who was it that, when asked to use the word "horticulture" in a
                                              >> sentence, said: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her
                                              >> think"?
                                              >
                                              >I first encountered it as the punchline to a horrid pun in the Callahans
                                              >books by Spider Robinson.

                                              Ahh, Google tells me it was Dorothy Parker. Not too surprising, I
                                              suppose.

                                              ObTopic: ARGH! 5 weeks to Pennsic, and two of them are taken up by
                                              conferences! ARGH ARGH ARGH!

                                              Yours,

                                              Katherine

                                              --
                                              Lady Katherine Robillard (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                                              katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                                              Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                                              "The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                                            • Mark Calderwood
                                              ... Actually, I was there when this happened, at the Manzikert
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Jul 3, 2001
                                                >Anyway, the story itself: A newish college member was at a large SCA
                                                >event, and ended up chatting to Mistress Rowan. The newcomer had heard
                                                >about how everyone has an SCA name, and asked what Rowan's was. When
                                                >Rowan answered, the newcomer is reported to have answered: "That's a
                                                >bit pretentious isn't it? I mean, naming yourself after the festival!"

                                                Actually, I was there when this happened, at the Manzikert


                                                >- - - - -
                                                >
                                                >Fast forward a few years, to a night at Rowany Festival when we were
                                                >sitting around a campfire after an evening of "peasanty muck" (you had
                                                >to be there) drinking truly horrible wine ("red surprise or white
                                                >surprise?" was what I was offered when I arrived). Rowan showed up and
                                                >was offered some peasanty muck and red surprise, and we asked her about
                                                >this story. See, it had been doing the rounds for years and we wanted
                                                >to know whether it had actually happened, and also what her reaction had
                                                >been.
                                                >
                                                >She was surprised to hear that the story had been going round for years
                                                >without her knowing, but confirmed that the incident had in fact
                                                >occurred, and that her response had been to stifle her laughter and make
                                                >an excuse to escape ASAP.
                                                >
                                                >I don't know what else she could have done, under the circumstances, and
                                                >on a couple of occasions I've realised that it's the only way to cope
                                                >without causing offence. Just pretend that you need to urgently talk to
                                                >someone you've just spotted on the other side of the hall, and run away
                                                >before your ears bleed or any other nasty symptoms occur :)
                                                >
                                                >Yours,
                                                >
                                                >Katherine
                                                >
                                                >--
                                                >Lady Katherine Robillard (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                                                >katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                                                >Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                                                >"The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >
                                                >Message: 21
                                                > Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2001 01:29:43 -0400
                                                > From: Kirrily Robert <skud@...>
                                                >Subject: Re: Re: "Please go away" moments
                                                >
                                                >Brynn wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > >You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can't make them read it.(or
                                                > >follow it).
                                                >
                                                >"... but you can't make them think" would scan better.
                                                >
                                                >Who was it that, when asked to use the word "horticulture" in a
                                                >sentence, said: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her
                                                >think"?
                                                >
                                                >Yours,
                                                >
                                                >Katherine
                                                >
                                                >--
                                                >Lady Katherine Robillard (mka Kirrily "Skud" Robert)
                                                >katherine@... http://infotrope.net/sca/
                                                >Caldrithig, Skraeling Althing, Ealdormere
                                                >"The rose is red, the leaves are grene, God save Elizabeth our Queene"
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >
                                                >Message: 22
                                                > Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2001 01:50:49 -0500
                                                > From: "Jeanne Harney" <jeanne@...>
                                                >Subject: Re: Re: "Please go away" moments
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >----- Original Message -----
                                                >From: "Kirrily Robert" <skud@...>
                                                >Brynn wrote:
                                                > > >
                                                > > >You can lead a SCAdian to researh but you can't make them read it.(or
                                                > > >follow it).
                                                > >
                                                > > "... but you can't make them think" would scan better.
                                                > >
                                                > > Who was it that, when asked to use the word "horticulture" in a
                                                > > sentence, said: "You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her
                                                > > think"?
                                                >
                                                >I first encountered it as the punchline to a horrid pun in the Callahans
                                                >books by Spider Robinson.
                                                >
                                                >Jeanne
                                                >who bought a war wagon today. I walked into the dealership, wrote a check,
                                                >and walked out with an extended cab van. Tres cool!
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >
                                                >Message: 23
                                                > Date: Mon, 02 Jul 2001 23:19:37 -0700
                                                > From: Ariane Helou <ahelou@...>
                                                >Subject: Re: Re: Linguistics project (was Good Morning...)
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > >We should put together our own list of terms: Frankensteining,
                                                > >pseudo-celtoid filkmonkeys...
                                                >
                                                >I've been debating whether to put these in (and Celtigoth, too). They are,
                                                >after all, slang terms, and like most slang their usage denotes membership
                                                >in a specific social group (ie, this list) ;-) Maybe I'll use them...and
                                                >credit the originators, of course :-) (Who did the filkmonkey
                                                >one? Jehanne??)
                                                >
                                                >Vittoria the pseudo-linguist
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >________________________________________________________________________
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                                                >
                                              • leigh@dandy.net
                                                Hi, All. Shampoo might clean well, but stay away from hot water and agitation (scrubbing, etc.) That is how felt is made, and, once felted, cannot be reversed.
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Jul 3, 2001
                                                  Hi, All. Shampoo might clean well, but stay away from hot water and
                                                  agitation (scrubbing, etc.) That is how felt is made, and, once
                                                  felted, cannot be reversed. I have a number of skins, including one
                                                  from a ram who had it coming to him (sleeping on your enemies' hide is
                                                  the best revenge). If it is a longhair, it will be more difficult, but
                                                  a stiff hairbrush or Afro-pick (back in style) can get out a lot of
                                                  tangles. If you must wet it, use cold water (a garden hose with the
                                                  skin over a fence rail will work), but the traditional method of
                                                  removing grease and filth (after running the sheep through a
                                                  stream)was either bran or fuller's earth. If it is a commercially
                                                  tanned hide, there is probably no lanolin left in the wool anyway.
                                                  What do you plan to do with them? That may have some bearing on their
                                                  need for cleaning. Mike T.
                                                • Kate Jones
                                                  ... Sit on them, sleep on them, drape them over things. I m not planning on cutting them up and making them into anything if that s what you re getting at. So
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Jul 4, 2001
                                                    > What do you plan to do with them? That may have some bearing on their
                                                    > need for cleaning. Mike T.

                                                    Sit on them, sleep on them, drape them over things. I'm not planning
                                                    on cutting them up and making them into anything if that's what you're
                                                    getting at. So if they're still sort of slightly yellowish that's fine
                                                    - I just want to get the big spot of dirt off of the nicer one if I
                                                    can.

                                                    Kat'ryna
                                                    --
                                                    Kate Jones | I turned my world upside-down
                                                    kate@... | and that's how everything landed...
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